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Sophie Evans, seven, was left with a part of her skull exposed after being torn by a German shepherd. She is seen after sewing the cut on her face together and wearing a head bandage over a wound that left her skull exposed

A seven-year-old girl almost lost her eye and was left with part of her skull exposed after being torn apart by a German shepherd.

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Sophie Evans had lifted a part of her face and scalp during the cruel attack outside her home in Wombwell, South Yorkshire, in January.

She spent more than five hours on the operation with the cut, one of which was only millimeters away from her right eye, attached to each other.

Sophie Evans, seven, was left with a part of her skull exposed after being torn by a German shepherd. She is seen after sewing the cut on her face together and wearing a head bandage over a wound that left her skull exposed

Sophie Evans, seven, was left with a part of her skull exposed after being torn by a German shepherd. She is seen after sewing the cut on her face together and wearing a head bandage over a wound that left her skull exposed

She became bloody and bruised after the brutal attack outside her home in Wombwell, South Yorkshire, in January

She became bloody and bruised after the brutal attack outside her home in Wombwell, South Yorkshire, in January

She became bloody and bruised after the brutal attack outside her home in Wombwell, South Yorkshire, in January

The brave youngster, who assured her distraught parents that she was & # 39; OK & # 39; has now been fully recovered
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The brave youngster, who assured her distraught parents that she was & # 39; OK & # 39; has now been fully recovered

The brave youngster, who assured her distraught parents that she was & # 39; OK & # 39; has now been fully recovered

Her mother Lyndsey, 34, described her horror at seeing her daughter soaked in blood with bite wounds over her face and scalp in A&E.

Mrs. Evans praised the & # 39; magic hands & # 39; of surgeons at the Sheffield Children & # 39; s Hospital who treated her at the time.

She said: & # 39; I got a call at work saying that Sophie had been attacked and that I had a broken heart when I saw her.

& # 39; To this day, I can't believe how brave she was when I arrived. She held out her hand and said: & # 39; Mama, I'm fine & # 39 ;. & # 39;

Mrs. Evans said that Sophie was taken to a local hospital, but then transferred to the emergency department at Sheffield Children's Hospital.

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She said Sophie Jack's nine-year-old brother was there during the attack and was afraid she would not survive. It is unclear who owned the dog.

& # 39; I'm used to seeing people on their worst days, but nothing can prepare you to be a parent on the other side, & # 39; said Mrs. Evans, who is a hospital receptionist.

Sophie was treated by the emergency response team before spending four and a half hours of operations the next morning.

Sophie & # 39; s nine-year-old brother Jack saw that the attack was there during the attack and was worried that she would not survive

Sophie & # 39; s nine-year-old brother Jack saw that the attack was there during the attack and was worried that she would not survive

Sophie & # 39; s nine-year-old brother Jack saw that the attack was there during the attack and was worried that she would not survive

Sophie (with the family on vacation in the summer) was treated at that time by the emergency team before spending four and a half hours of operations the next morning
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Sophie (with the family on vacation in the summer) was treated at that time by the emergency team before spending four and a half hours of operations the next morning

Sophie (with the family on vacation in the summer) was treated at that time by the emergency team before spending four and a half hours of operations the next morning

She was fired two days later and Sophie was back at Kingsoak Primary School, in Wombwell, within three weeks.

Mrs. Evans said: “All the employees who helped us were absolutely wonderful, words will never be enough to explain how eternally grateful we will be.

& # 39; On the worst day of our lives, they made sure we were all cared for and reassured.

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& # 39; Thanks to the magical hands of the emergency team, her scars are barely noticeable today. They fixed up my Sophie and she is perfect for us again. & # 39;

The family has now dedicated itself to fundraising for the £ 4.5 million call from The Children & # 39; s Hospital Charity to build a new emergency department at Sheffield Children & # 39; s Hospital.

The grateful family has now dedicated itself to fundraising for The Children & # 39; s Hospital Charity. Jack has already started the effort, running his first 10K ever next to his father (pictured after the event)

The grateful family has now dedicated itself to fundraising for The Children & # 39; s Hospital Charity. Jack has already started the effort, running his first 10K ever next to his father (pictured after the event)

The grateful family has now dedicated itself to fundraising for The Children & # 39; s Hospital Charity. Jack has already started the effort, running his first 10K ever next to his father (pictured after the event)

Jack has already started the effort and ran his very first 10K ever alongside his father – security officer Rob, 37. The couple raised £ 800 for the appeal.

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David Vernon-Edwards, director of The Children & # 39; s Hospital Charity, said the emergency department was built to see up to 32,000 patients each year, but nearly 57,000 last year.

In addition to the extensive waiting room and clinical room, the redevelopment will also build a special room for children with mental or learning difficulties and a separate section for adolescents.

Mr. Vernon-Edwards said: & We are so grateful to Sophie's family for sharing their story and her brother, Jack, for his fantastic fundraising. & # 39;

Man loses his legs, arms, nose and lips after his pit bull licked him

Greg Manteufel, 49, from West Bend, Wisconsin, lost his arms, legs and part of his nose and upper lip after licking his pitbull Ellie caused by a rare reaction to the pet's saliva.

The case is extremely rare and doctors at his hospital, Froedtert and the Medical College of Wisconsin, could not declare that he became so ill.

In the past 10 years, at least six people have had severe reactions to a rare form of bacteria called capnocytophaga, which is common and harmless in dogs, but can be fatal to people who catch it.

Greg Manteufel, 49, (photo, in the hospital), from West Bend, Wisconsin, who lost part of his upper lip, nose, hands and part of his legs after a rare blood infection through his dog's saliva

Greg Manteufel, 49, (photo, in the hospital), from West Bend, Wisconsin, who lost part of his upper lip, nose, hands and part of his legs after a rare blood infection through his dog's saliva

Greg Manteufel, 49, (photo, in the hospital), from West Bend, Wisconsin, who lost part of his upper lip, nose, hands and part of his legs after a rare blood infection through his dog's saliva

Manteufel was taken to the hospital in June after flu-like symptoms and bruises on his arms and legs. Pictured: Manteufel with his dog, Ellie, with his wife, Dawn

Manteufel was taken to the hospital in June after flu-like symptoms and bruises on his arms and legs. Pictured: Manteufel with his dog, Ellie, with his wife, Dawn

Manteufel was taken to the hospital in June after flu-like symptoms and bruises on his arms and legs. Pictured: Manteufel with his dog, Ellie, with his wife, Dawn

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But researchers Harvard Medical School has found a gene variant among the victims that makes people more susceptible to the development of serious medical problems caused by the bacteria.

Manteufel thought he got the flu in June 2018 after experiencing symptoms of fever, vomiting, and diarrhea. But when he got confused, his family brought him to the hospital.

Doctors carried out blood tests and discovered that he had been infected with a bacterial pathogen called capnocytophaga canimorsus.

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the bacteria is found in the saliva of healthy dogs and cats.

A 2014 study from Japan showed that the bacterium was present in 69 percent of the dogs and 54 percent of the cats.

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The bacteria can be transmitted to humans through the animals' bites and licks.

Although most people show no symptoms when they become infected, a study from France in 2003 has shown that it causes serious diseases in people with an immune system.

It is unclear whether Manteufel already had pre-existing conditions, but he developed sepsis or blood poisoning and his nose, both hands and legs under his knees, went black.

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