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School that called the police about a six-year-old who went down with a finger gun

School that called the police about a six-year-old girl with Down syndrome, who made a finger gun to the teacher, refuses to go back and says it did the RIGHT thing

  • Six-year-old Margot made a gun gesture to a teacher last November
  • Her mother Maggie Gaines was shocked when the police were summoned to investigate
  • School district maintains its decision to involve the police in the incident

A school that called the police on a six-year-old girl with Down’s syndrome after pretending to be shooting her teacher with her fingers, refused to step back and claims it did the right thing.

The girl’s mother, Maggie Gaines, had accused Valley Forge Elementary School in Pennsylvania of having misunderstood the incident last November.

Her daughter Margot got frustrated in class and pointed her finger at the teacher and said, “I shoot you.”

The school contacted Gaines and told her that the district policy was that they reported the incident to the local police.

Maggie Gaines is pictured above with her daughter Margot, who was reported to the police after making a gun gesture with her fingers

Maggie Gaines is pictured above with her daughter Margot, who was reported to the police after making a gun gesture with her fingers

Gaines explained the incident in an interview with CBS3 and maintained that her daughter had no idea what she said was threatening

Gaines explained the incident in an interview with CBS3 and maintained that her daughter had no idea what she said was threatening

Gaines explained the incident in an interview with CBS3 and maintained that her daughter had no idea what she said was threatening

Gaines said Valley Forge Elementary School administrators (photo) responded excessively by contacting the police about her daughter while no one ever got in the way

Gaines said Valley Forge Elementary School administrators (photo) responded excessively by contacting the police about her daughter while no one ever got in the way

Gaines said Valley Forge Elementary School administrators (photo) responded excessively by contacting the police about her daughter while no one ever got in the way

The school district has since told it CNN that the police did not make a criminal record or youth registration for Margot and defended her decision to investigate the case.

‘By requesting a police meeting, agencies can provide the information they need to provide appropriate support, and use it.

“It’s not the same as submitting a police report and asking for an investigation.”

The school did not ask for further investigation after it appeared that little Margot was not going to harm anyone.

Despite the response from the school district, Gaines has now said it was “going too far.”

Despite the response from the school district, Gaines has now said it was “going too far.”

Gaines said earlier that contacting the police was a serious overreaction because it was clear that Margot didn’t know what “I’m shooting at you” and was just trying to convey her frustration.

“She really didn’t understand what she said, and Down’s syndrome is one aspect, but I’m sure all six-year-olds don’t really know what that means,” the mother said.

The mother raised the issue in a letter to the school board last month and said that school officials misinterpret policies and state law.

Sen. Andrew Dinniman from Pennsylvania, who was contacted by the Gaines family, also expressed concern about how the district dealt with the matter.

“As a senator, educator and parent, I am concerned when I hear that such important decisions seem to be blindly guided by written policies or legal interpretation without those in positions of authority weighing their judgment, experience, and common sense,” Dinniman said in a statement .

“Furthermore, I am alarmed that a school appears to be acting as an extension of the police force in the dissemination of data and data about children as young as infants.”

Last year, the Pennsylvania legislature approved a bill that obliges school in the state to set up threat assessment teams, which in turn develop their own student safety measures.

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