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Scavengers gather to take dismantled pieces from the infamous 12-meter sculpture of Byron Bay

Scavengers gather to take dismantled pieces of the notorious 12-meter-long disco dong sculpture

  • The ‘Disco dong’ was removed a year after installation on NSW in the middle of the north coast
  • The artwork was a 12 meter high silver conical structure that looked like a penis
  • Since the removal there is a mad rush to get a piece of ‘Byron history’

There has been a huge rush to get one piece of infamous art that became controversial because it looked like a giant silver penis.

The ‘disco-dong’ was dismantled 12 months after it was erected in the main street of Byron Bay after causing indignation in the community for its resemblance to a phallus.

But since it has been pulled down, it has become more popular than the entire time it has been seen, with people standing in line for hours to get a piece of history.

The 'Disco dong' is high in all its glory and will be dismantled by the Byron Shire Council at the end of 2019

The ‘Disco dong’ is high in all its glory and will be dismantled by the Byron Shire Council at the end of 2019

The Byron Bay shire Council paid $ 55,000 for the work of Melbourne artist Corey Thomas, reports ABC news.

The 12 meter high sculpture consisted of thousands of aluminum birds, designed to represent the Byron Bay lighthouse.

But when it was installed, it was nicknamed “disco-dong” and “coastal shaft” and was widely criticized on social media.

Although the image was widely criticized, it also had a strong group of supporters.

During the campaign to have the sculpture removed, fans of the ‘Byron Disco Dong Applied Society’ hung a sign on the artwork with the text ‘hands off our dong’.

The 12 meter high sculpture consisted of thousands of aluminum birds, designed to represent the Byron Bay

The 12 meter high sculpture consisted of thousands of aluminum birds, designed to represent the Byron Bay

The 12 meter high sculpture consisted of thousands of aluminum birds, designed to represent the Byron Bay

Pieces of the 'Disco-dong' sculpture decorate a Christmas tree

Pieces of the 'Disco-dong' sculpture decorate a Christmas tree

Pieces of the ‘Disco-dong’ sculpture decorate a Christmas tree

The statue was demolished in September and thousands of silver birds were offered for sale by the municipality before Christmas.

Each of the 3,500 birds was sold separately.

The sale was so successful that the $ 64,000 raised actually cost more than the municipality paid for the statue itself.

Fans stood in line for hours to get a piece of the iconic image when it was auctioned.

One of those was Annie Briggs, who told ABC news she wanted her own part of the story.

“I was interested because it was just a little quirky and there was so much hoo-ha about the image that I thought it would be good to get a bit of history from Byron,” she said.

The statue was dismantled and each of the 3,500 birds was sold separately

The statue was dismantled and each of the 3,500 birds was sold separately

The statue was dismantled and each of the 3,500 birds was sold separately

Another supporter – Richard Holloway – bought his own part of the statue and has reused it as a work of art in his backyard.

“It’s just nice to have some memorabilia and a memory of what once was,” he said.

He said that the placement of the artwork was probably part of the reason it was so controversial.

“I thought it was a very attractive piece of art, but just in the wrong location,” he said

The statue was given a new life after thousands of aluminum birds were pulled apart and sold separately

The statue was given a new life after thousands of aluminum birds were pulled apart and sold separately

The statue was given a new life after thousands of aluminum birds were pulled apart and sold separately

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