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Abdulaziz Alwasil (photo left), Riyada's ambassador to the United Nations, said the country's sympathy for Islamic haters had led to the massacre of 51 people by Brenton Tarrant in March

Saudi Arabia has launched an extraordinary attack on Australia and is calling on the government racially because it sympathizes & # 39; with the Christchurch mosque killer.

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Abdulaziz Alwasil, ambassador of Riyadh to the United Nations, said the country's sympathy for Muslim haters had led to the massacre of 51 people by Brenton Tarrant in March.

He launched his broad side after the Australian ambassador to the UN led a coalition of 24 countries that condemned Saudi Arabia for its multiple human rights violations.

Abdulaziz Alwasil (photo left), Riyada's ambassador to the United Nations, said the country's sympathy for Islamic haters had led to the massacre of 51 people by Brenton Tarrant in March

Abdulaziz Alwasil (photo left), Riyada's ambassador to the United Nations, said the country's sympathy for Islamic haters had led to the massacre of 51 people by Brenton Tarrant in March

These include the torture and detention of women's rights activists, forced disappearances and the murder of Jamal Khashoggi.

Alwasil hit back and said that minorities, migrants and Muslims are confronted with terrible human rights violations … racists and extremist policies.

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Helaas Unfortunately, these have become popular and even accepted by some Western parliaments, they are even sponsored by certain governments.

& # 39; We see radicalism against Muslims in some countries, we see xenophobia, racism. And some governments sympathize with them, such as Australia. Here we refer to the massacre committed by Brenton Tarrant – an Australian – that was based on hate speech & # 39 ;.

White supremacist Tarrant, 28, was born in Australia and moved to New Zealand just 18 months before the massacre, where he published a 74-page manifesto before his alleged disaster.

There is no evidence that he was radicalized in Australia, but during his travels to Asia and Europe, especially France, where he was desperate about the country's large Muslim population. He also visited historical battlefields in the Balkans.

White supremacist Tarrant, 28, was born in Australia and moved to New Zealand just 18 months before the massacre, where he published a 74-page manifesto before the rampage

White supremacist Tarrant, 28, was born in Australia and moved to New Zealand just 18 months before the massacre, where he published a 74-page manifesto before the rampage

White supremacist Tarrant, 28, was born in Australia and moved to New Zealand just 18 months before the massacre, where he published a 74-page manifesto before the rampage

He launched his broad side after the Australian ambassador to the UN Sally Mansfield (photo left) led a coalition of 24 countries that condemned Saudi Arabia for its multiple human rights violations

He launched his broad side after the Australian ambassador to the UN Sally Mansfield (photo left) led a coalition of 24 countries that condemned Saudi Arabia for its multiple human rights violations

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He launched his broad side after the Australian ambassador to the UN Sally Mansfield (photo left) led a coalition of 24 countries that condemned Saudi Arabia for its multiple human rights violations

When his family visited him before the attacks in New Zealand, they were worried when he showed the weapons he had bought, but no alarm was sounded.

In the aftermath of the murders, Australia rejected as & # 39; unsavory & # 39; allegations that anti-terrorism agencies are the threat of right-wing & # 39; extremists & # 39; as Tarrant had neglected because they were too focused on the threat of Muslim terrorists.

& # 39; These extremist groups – neo-Nazis, or white supremacists, extreme right-wing groups, whatever term you want to apply to them, they are square on their radar & # 39 ;, said Interior Minister Peter Dutton. the Australian Security Intelligence Organization. .

& # 39; They look at this threat really well, they treat the threat and think they have just discovered it or that they are late for the party is completely nonsense & # 39 ;.

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The Australian ambassador to the UN, Sally Mansfield, had delivered her speech to the 47-person UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, of which Saudi Arabia is a member.

Saudi Arabia launched an extraordinary attack on Australia and called its government (Prime Minister Scott Morrison pictured) & # 39; racist & # 39; because he & # 39; sympathetic & # 39; was for the accused Christchurch mosque killer

Saudi Arabia launched an extraordinary attack on Australia and called its government (Prime Minister Scott Morrison pictured) & # 39; racist & # 39; because he & # 39; sympathetic & # 39; was for the accused Christchurch mosque killer

Saudi Arabia launched an extraordinary attack on Australia and called its government (Prime Minister Scott Morrison pictured) & # 39; racist & # 39; because he & # 39; sympathetic & # 39; was for the accused Christchurch mosque killer

In a statement supported by the UK, Canada, Germany and New Zealand, she said: & We remain deeply concerned about the human rights situation in Saudi Arabia. Civil society actors in Saudi Arabia continue to face persecution and intimidation.

& # 39; Human rights defenders, women's rights activists, journalists and dissidents remain in custody or are threatened.

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& # 39; We are concerned about reports of torture, arbitrary detention, enforced disappearances, unfair trials and intimidation of individuals involved in promoting and defending human rights, their families and colleagues & # 39; s & # 39 ;.

Alwasil said that Mansfield & # 39; s speech & # 39; misleading & # 39; used to be.

But Edwina MacDonald, legal director of the Human Rights Law Center, said: & We welcome the Australian government for taking a basic position and talking about extreme human rights violations committed by another member of the council with impunity. & # 39;

Members of the public grieve for an improvised monument at the Al Noor Mosque on Deans Rd in Christchurch

Members of the public grieve for an improvised monument at the Al Noor Mosque on Deans Rd in Christchurch

Members of the public grieve for an improvised monument at the Al Noor Mosque on Deans Rd in Christchurch

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