Advertisements
This satellite image, made on October 27, shows the impact of the Kincade Fire, which has destroyed more than 76.00 hectares of land from space. The shortwave infrared images (SWIR) show burning areas that glow red and orange and burnt areas in brown. The blue areas indicate healthy, non-burnt vegetation

Photos from space show the advance of the gigantic Kincade Fire in Northern California, which has been torn through more than 76,825 hectares of land this week.

Advertisements

Images of the MaxView WorldView-3 satellite in space broke this week and show how the forest fire near Sonoma, California has been expanded, leaving rolling slopes and an asphalted vegetation behind.

Some photos were taken with unique shortwave infrared (SWIR) images that help officials control fires that penetrate smoke, detect active fire lines, and identify burnt vegetation.

This satellite image, made on October 27, shows the impact of the Kincade Fire, which has destroyed more than 76.00 hectares of land from space. The shortwave infrared images (SWIR) show burning areas that glow red and orange and burnt areas in brown. The blue areas indicate healthy, non-burnt vegetation

This satellite image, made on October 27, shows the impact of the Kincade Fire, which has destroyed more than 76.00 hectares of land from space. The shortwave infrared images (SWIR) show burning areas that glow red and orange and burnt areas in brown. The blue areas indicate healthy, non-burnt vegetation

Images of the MaxView WorldView-3 satellite in space broke this week and show how the forest fire near Sonoma, California has been expanded, leaving rolling slopes and an asphalted vegetation behind. Image above taken on October 27

Images of the MaxView WorldView-3 satellite in space broke this week and show how the forest fire near Sonoma, California has been expanded, leaving rolling slopes and an asphalted vegetation behind. Image above taken on October 27

Images of the MaxView WorldView-3 satellite in space broke this week and show how the forest fire near Sonoma, California has been expanded, leaving rolling slopes and an asphalted vegetation behind. Image above taken on October 27

This satellite photo, taken on October 30, shows the smoking mountains in Northern California near Santa Rosa, where the Kincade fire continues to burn. This image shows that the fire came dangerously close to the city of Healdsburg and destroyed property on the eastern outskirts of the city
Advertisements

This satellite photo, taken on October 30, shows the smoking mountains in Northern California near Santa Rosa, where the Kincade fire continues to burn. This image shows that the fire came dangerously close to the city of Healdsburg and destroyed property on the eastern outskirts of the city

This satellite photo, taken on October 30, shows the smoking mountains in Northern California near Santa Rosa, where the Kincade fire continues to burn. This image shows that the fire came dangerously close to the city of Healdsburg and destroyed property on the eastern outskirts of the city

With SWIR images, healthy and non-burnt vegetation appears in shades of blue, while burnt areas have an orange or rust-like color. Meanwhile, areas with active fires glow red and orange.

The Kincade Fire is the biggest hell in Northern California in Sonoma County, in the heart of the wine country, while Southern California rages from a stream of forest fires.

The fire, which fueled October 23, destroyed 76,825 hectares of land, destroyed 282 structures, and was closed for only 60%, Cal Fire announced on Thursday morning.

Pink retarder pictured around a house in the forested hills near Santa Rosa on October 30

Pink retarder pictured around a house in the forested hills near Santa Rosa on October 30

Pink retarder pictured around a house in the forested hills near Santa Rosa on October 30

This photo of October 30 shows smoke that penetrates these mountain properties near Santa Rosa
Advertisements

This photo of October 30 shows smoke that penetrates these mountain properties near Santa Rosa

This photo of October 30 shows smoke that penetrates these mountain properties near Santa Rosa

This October 30 image shows smoke in the Kincade fire crawling on Healdsburg

This October 30 image shows smoke in the Kincade fire crawling on Healdsburg

This October 30 image shows smoke in the Kincade fire crawling on Healdsburg

& # 39; These firefighters have worked so hard. The fact that they have saved every house in the city is amazing, & said Windsor mayor Dominic Foppoli. & # 39; I can't think of anything else in the history of the city that & # 39; n reason was worthy to celebrate. & # 39;

Advertisements

Nearly 5,245 firefighters were on the scene around the perimeter of the fire, heavy on the western and eastern flanks, Jonathan Cox, Cal Fire Division, said Wednesday in a press conference.

& # 39; We are now reaping the benefits of that investment & # 39 ;, said Cox. He added that the successful Wednesday successes were a testament to all the sweat and hours of physical labor that is in every 1% of the inclusion.

But there is more work to do.

While Southern California is raging from a wave of nearby forest fires, a huge hell called Kincade Fire is raging in Northern California in Sonoma County, in the heart of the wine country. The eruption, which fueled October 23, has destroyed 76,825 hectares of land and is only 60% from Thursday morning

While Southern California is raging from a wave of nearby forest fires, a huge hell called Kincade Fire is raging in Northern California in Sonoma County, in the heart of the wine country. The eruption, which fueled October 23, has destroyed 76,825 hectares of land and is only 60% from Thursday morning

While Southern California is raging from a wave of nearby forest fires, a huge hell called Kincade Fire is raging in Northern California in Sonoma County, in the heart of the wine country. The eruption, which fueled October 23, has destroyed 76,825 hectares of land and is only 60% from Thursday morning

Firefighters watch a structure burn during the Kincade fire off Highway 128, east of Healdsburg, California on Tuesday
Advertisements

Firefighters watch a structure burn during the Kincade fire off Highway 128, east of Healdsburg, California on Tuesday

Firefighters watch a structure burn during the Kincade fire off Highway 128, east of Healdsburg, California on Tuesday

Nearly 5,245 firefighters were on the scene around the perimeter of the fire, heavy on the western and eastern flanks, Jonathan Cox, Cal Fire Division, said Wednesday in a press conference. Firefighters pictured on Tuesday

Nearly 5,245 firefighters were on the scene around the perimeter of the fire, heavy on the western and eastern flanks, Jonathan Cox, Cal Fire Division, said Wednesday in a press conference. Firefighters pictured on Tuesday

Nearly 5,245 firefighters were on the scene around the perimeter of the fire, heavy on the western and eastern flanks, Jonathan Cox, Cal Fire Division, said Wednesday in a press conference. Firefighters pictured on Tuesday

& # 39; Until we reach that 80, 90% limit, there is that potential. We cannot disappoint our watch & # 39 ;, he said.

Advertisements

Although no deaths or missing persons were reported, two firefighters were injured in the recovery effort and more than 90.00 buildings remained threatened.

Evacuation orders were lifted on Wednesday for more than 140,000 residents in Sonoma County, including in the cities of Healdsburg and Windsor, in Geyserville south of Canyon Road and in parts of Santa Rosa, Larkfield, Rincon Valley and Fulton, according to SFGate.

But there are still around 6,000 people under mandatory evacuation, a fall of more than 180,000 on the weekend.

It is speculated that it is caused by a broken starter cable on a Pacific Gas and Electric Co. electricity transmission tower.

The Kincade Fire is just one of more than 10 forest fires that burn up and down the state of California, and is the largest and most threatening of them all.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news (t) California