Satellite images confirm that global warming is heating the planet

Satellite images confirm that global warming is warming the planet by creating & # 39; skin & # 39; maps from NASA & # 39; s data

  • Heat map of the & # 39; skin & # 39; Earth's surface via satellite confirms rising temperatures
  • These recordings from 2003-2017 confirm country-based measurement data
  • Together they show that the hottest year on earth in recorded history was 2016

Satellite measurements of the Earth's surface temperature have confirmed that global warming is warming the planet.

The infrared system measures heat radiating from the earth and was used to store temperatures from 2003 to 2017.

The surface temperature map, derived solely from the satellite data, showed a warming pattern that was consistent with other measurements on land.

A combination of both datasets and all existing research now offers almost irrefutable evidence of the greenhouse effect, researchers claim.

Scroll down for video

Earth's rising temperature is visualized via satellite & # 39; skin & # 39; surface maps that confirm that global warming is warming the planet. The system that measures the heat energy emitted from the earth via infrared, was used to record temperatures from 2003 to 2017 (file photo)

Earth's rising temperature is visualized via satellite & # 39; skin & # 39; surface maps that confirm that global warming is warming the planet. The system that measures the heat energy emitted from the earth via infrared, was used to record temperatures from 2003 to 2017 (file photo)

The results were compared with station-based land temperature surface analyzes, primarily those from the US Space Agency, the Goddard Space Flight Center from the US space agency NASA.

The authors of the document showing the results wrote in the report: & # 39; The surface temperatures based on the satellite can serve as an important validation of surface-based estimates and help to improve surface-based data sets on a way that can be expanded many decades back to do further scientific research. & # 39;

Dr. Joel Susskind, from the space center of the American space organization Nasa, and the author of the newspaper, said: & # 39; Both data sets show that the Earth's surface is warming globally during this period and that 2016, 2017 and 2015 are the hottest years in instrumental record, in that order. & # 39;

The skin map, derived solely from the satellite data, showed a warm-up pattern that matches other measurements (shown) taken at land stations, including those from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

The skin map, derived solely from the satellite data, showed a warm-up pattern that matches other measurements (shown) taken at land stations, including those from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

The skin map, derived solely from the satellite data, showed a warm-up pattern that matches other measurements (shown) taken at land stations, including those from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

The satellite system, called Airs (Atmospheric Infra-Red Sounder), records the temperature on the surface of the ocean, land and snow-covered areas.

The findings were compared with station-based data from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies Surface Temperature Analysis (Gistemp).

Co-author Dr. Gavin Schmidt, also from the Goddard Institute, said: & # 39; Interestingly, our findings revealed that the surface-based data sets may underestimate the temperature changes in the Arctic.

& # 39; This means that warming at the poles may be faster than previously thought. & # 39;

The full report of the study is published in the journal Environmental Research Letters.

Advertisement