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SAS hero who saved hundreds when he killed two terrorists in Kenya gets Gallantry Cross

A SAS soldier who killed two Muslim militants during a terror attack in Kenya receives one of the highest honors from the UK.

He receives a Conspicuous Gallantry Cross, a brave medal after a Victoria Cross, for his response to al-Shabaab terrorist rifle and grenade attacks at the DusitD2 hotel in Nairobi on January 15.

The terrorists killed 21 people, including the British charity Luke Potter, before the bloodshed was brought to a halt.

A SAS soldier (photo) who killed two Muslim militants during an al-Shabaab terrorist attack on a hotel in Kenya has received a Conspicuous Gallantry Cross. He has seen a wounded man here help away from the attack when blood flowed from the victim's back

A SAS soldier (photo) who killed two Muslim militants during an al-Shabaab terrorist attack on a hotel in Kenya has received a Conspicuous Gallantry Cross. He has seen a wounded man here help away from the attack when blood flowed from the victim's back

The soldier saw civilians accompany him to the safety of the building, where terrorists went on a gun and a bomb attack

The soldier saw civilians accompany him to the safety of the building, where terrorists went on a gun and a bomb attack

The soldier saw civilians accompany him to the safety of the building, where terrorists went on a gun and a bomb attack

The unnamed elite soldier will receive the medal later this month, The sun reported. He entered the complex without backup to help evacuate 700 people.

One image showed the Brit carrying a wounded person in safety while blood was flowing from the victim's back.

The veteran of the special forces, who allegedly served in the SAS for 18 years, shot and killed two of the four shooters on his brave solo raid.

Reportedly, he only became involved in the terror operation when US Navy Seals asked for his help.

The soldier was only supposed to provide mentoring and training to Kenyan troops in the country. But when the terrorists attacked, American special forces present were not given the green light to enter.

A soldier from the Kenyan army watches as the SAS man enters the DusitD2 hotel during the January 15 attack, killing 21 people

A soldier from the Kenyan army watches as the SAS man enters the DusitD2 hotel during the January 15 attack, killing 21 people

A soldier from the Kenyan army watches as the SAS man enters the DusitD2 hotel during the January 15 attack, killing 21 people

The soldier was only supposed to provide mentoring and training to Kenyan troops in the country. He is pictured here talking to members of the security forces

The soldier was only supposed to provide mentoring and training to Kenyan troops in the country. He is pictured here talking to members of the security forces

The soldier was only supposed to provide mentoring and training to Kenyan troops in the country. He is pictured here talking to members of the security forces

The Kenyan anti-terror police had the attack on the militants under control, but when the SAS man received his orders, he himself entered the hotel complex.

Armed with a Colt Canada C8 assault rifle and a Glock pistol, he worked to end the terrorist threat.

A source said: "This is an incredible honor and really deserved. What this man did will happen in the history of the SAS.

& # 39; Yet it hardly happened after a fight on the floor. & # 39;

A striking Gallantry Cross, one of the highest awards in the UK

A striking Gallantry Cross, one of the highest awards in the UK

A striking Gallantry Cross, one of the highest awards in the UK

He had worked with the Kenyan forces – who were being followed by SEALs – when the incident & # 39; started & # 39; but there was a & # 39; critical pause & # 39; among US forces while waiting for permission to enter, the source said.

"People died and they knew they had a man in their midst who could turn the tide. He had to go inside. & # 39;

The last known prize of the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross, given for courage against the enemy, was in March 2014 for Lance Corporal Simon Moloney.

The al-Shabaab terror group claimed that the attack was a reaction to the controversial decision by US President Donald Trump to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

At the time, Joshua Kwambai, who ran out of a restaurant when the terrorists opened fire, said the SAS troop was one of the first people to come there.

Kwambi added that the soldier was wearing a mask, but it was clear that he was white – and he could see him talking to the police and the army listening to him.

They had looked at paper – possible plans for the building, he said.

Witness Lucy Njeri said the soldier executed one of the wounded and then went inside a second time.

There had been a lot of confusion, but he would stand out because he was a foreigner.

The prize is one of the prizes expected to be published at the end of this month in the Operational Honors list.

A Ministry of Defense spokesperson said, "We do not comment on Special Forces."

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