SARAH VINE: Oh honey, Meghan has a lot to learn

As we know, Meghan (proposed last month by Prince Harry in London) plans to plan a midwife-led home job away from the & # 39; men in suits & # 39 ;, SARAH VINE writes

As we know, Meghan (proposed last month by Prince Harry in London) plans to plan a midwife-led home job away from the & # 39; men in suits & # 39 ;, SARAH VINE writes

There was something about the beautiful pictures of the Duchess of Sussex as a newborn baby in the arms of her mother Doria in the Mail this week that reminded me a bit of the arrival of my own daughter, almost 16 years ago .

The same little expression on the baby and the same look in the eyes of her new mother, a mixture of shock, exhaustion and awe.

But above all, in the background, the calm and recognizable presence of grandma.

No one knows better how your first birth will probably turn out than your own mother, who has been there, has done that and can offer honest, practical advice.

And just as her mother was such a reassuring presence, I am sure that Doria, now it's Meghan's turn, is a source of wisdom for her daughter.

As we know, Meghan – who he is going to use every day – is planning homework with midwives, away from the & # 39; men in suits & # 39 ;.

She is reportedly also in favor of a water birth and uses yoga, meditation and homeopathy to prepare for the arrival.

Apparently, she wants it to be as natural as possible: no drugs, no caesarean sections, etc. & # 39 ;.

I would expect nothing less from this most modern young royal family that has always been an avid advocate of a healthy, holistic lifestyle.

If someone has the chance to achieve the kind of magical, mystical birth that every woman dreams of, it is she. But I hope Doria advises Meghan to keep her feet on the ground about this apparent desire for perfection.

I have nothing against home births, water births – or whatever kind of birth.

Apparently Meghan (shown in February with Prince Harry in Rabat, Morocco) wants it to be as natural as possible: no drugs, no caesarean sections, and so on, & # 39 ;, SARAH VINE writes

Apparently Meghan (shown in February with Prince Harry in Rabat, Morocco) wants it to be as natural as possible: no drugs, no caesarean sections, and so on, & # 39 ;, SARAH VINE writes

Apparently Meghan (shown in February with Prince Harry in Rabat, Morocco) wants it to be as natural as possible: no drugs, no caesarean sections, and so on, & # 39 ;, SARAH VINE writes

It's just that having babies & # 39; s is not an exact science. Work can, it is true, be a nice experience. But it can also be primitive and elementary. And you never really know how it will turn out.

To be prepared, a woman must really be open to all possible events. Yet an entire industry seems to have risen to feed mothers in the pipeline with the idea that we have complete control of the process (we are not: that is the privilege of mother nature, and she is a capricious old cow) and that there is a right and wrong way to have a baby.

In recent years, this has come to mean that having a child without medical intervention or pain relief is somehow morally superior. Naturally good; medically assisted poorly.

It is an attitude summarized by a friend of mine who, after having undergone an elective caesarean section with her second child after serious complications with her first, was asked by her health visitor if she ever felt cheated & # 39; ; that they do not have & # 39; good labor & # 39; had & # 39 ;. The answer, of course, was no. Or at least she wasn't up until then.

There is nothing wrong with having an ideal vision of how you want your baby to be born. Just as long as you keep in mind that things can be very different.

Otherwise you could end up as another friend who had completely rested her heart on a birth at home.

She and her husband had it all done: the swimming pool, the Tens machine, the Christmas lights, the beach balls, the Peruvian pan pipe music – everything.

I spoke to her just when she entered the fight. Then I waited for the cheering phone call. And waited. And waited. Nothing.

Two days later a shaken new father called me. It was a car accident, hours of unbearable pain ending in a crazy lightning to the hospital and a caesarean section.

My poor friend was traumatized – all the worse because she expected it to be such a beautiful & # 39; n wonderful, & # 39; empowering & # 39; experience would be.

I'm sure Meghan will be fine. Not least because if things don't go according to plan, those dreaded & # 39; men in suits & # 39; stand by their nasty science to ensure that there is no damage to her or the baby.

But I would urge her not to become too fixated on the idea of ​​the & # 39; perfect birth & # 39 ;.

But I would urge her not to get too fixated on the idea of ​​the & # 39; perfect birth & # 39 ;, SARAH VINE writes. Meghan is displayed in the Natural History Museum in February in London

But I would urge her not to get too fixated on the idea of ​​the & # 39; perfect birth & # 39 ;, SARAH VINE writes. Meghan is displayed in the Natural History Museum in February in London

But I would urge her not to get too fixated on the idea of ​​the & # 39; perfect birth & # 39 ;, SARAH VINE writes. Meghan is displayed in the Natural History Museum in February in London

June Brown – Dot Cotton in EastEnders – is quite right when she says it makes no sense to give up the drink and fags at her age (92).

It reminds me of the time – years ago – when my father stopped drinking. After about six weeks he picked up again.

His reasoning? If the relentless sobriety would be the rest of his life, he saw no reason to extend it.

What's the point? EastEnders legend June Brown, 92, said she doesn't see the point of quitting smoking or drinking red wine

What's the point? EastEnders legend June Brown, 92, said she doesn't see the point of quitting smoking or drinking red wine

What's the point? EastEnders legend June Brown, 92, said she doesn't see the point of quitting smoking or drinking red wine

A touch of Killing Eve, 007?

Can anyone please stop jubilating about Fleabag?

I'm just as excited as the next person, but there is a thin line between worshiped and overexposed, and we don't want the nation to reach the peak of Phoebe Waller Bridge before – like rumors – its magic on the new James Bond movie .

If she can even take a little bit of Villanelle – the enchanting anti-heroine of Killing Eve (played by Jodie Comer) – to the stifling old school format of 007, then we can take the ride of our lives.

Jodie Comer is depicted in the Killing Eve of the BBC

Jodie Comer is depicted in the Killing Eve of the BBC

Jodie Comer is depicted in the Killing Eve of the BBC

Call me a knuckle …

I am afraid that the news that Shamima Begum may be receiving legal aid to keep her right to follow a British citizen is just driving me crazy.

So many of my rational, better educated friends have tried to convince me that I am a fool, that she deserves to make her case heard, that it is the hallmark of a truly civilized society that we must respect her human rights.

Yes, yes. . . I have no doubt that they are morally and philosophically correct. But it still touches me.

I am afraid that the news that Shamima Begum (photo) may receive legal aid to keep following her right to continue to follow a British citizen is just driving me crazy

I am afraid that the news that Shamima Begum (photo) may receive legal aid to keep following her right to continue to follow a British citizen is just driving me crazy

I am afraid that the news that Shamima Begum (photo) may receive legal aid to keep following her right to continue to follow a British citizen is just driving me crazy

I found it disgusting that the Islamic rabat preacher Abu Hamza succeeded in playing the justice system so successfully, avoiding justice and at the same time mocking everything we hold dear; and I find it equally reprehensible that Shamima Begum – who so blatantly embraced an ideology that proposed the rape, murder, torture and genocide of thousands of innocents – should also benefit.

I do not care for the moral high ground; I care about right and wrong. And wasting a single cent of taxpayer money on that woman just makes a mess.

I have to admit that I found the first episode of the last series incredibly boring and heavy

I have to admit that I found the first episode of the last series incredibly boring and heavy

I have to admit that I found the first episode of the last series incredibly boring and heavy

As a fan of Game Of Thrones, I have to admit that I found the first episode of the last series incredibly boring and heavy.

The joy of this show was always his bizarre absurdity; but now it seems – and all the main characters – to take everything too seriously.

Especially Jon Snow and Daenerys (right), who float around like a bunch of goths in love, give a new meaning to the saying: & # 39; It's grim in the north. & # 39; Relieves boys, wringing less hands and more grinding teeth.

Preferably large, sharp, pointed dragons. . .

The following is the introduction of half sizes to help women find jeans that fit perfectly.

I must confess that I have never found jeans that fit. Even when I was young and relatively sylph-like, jeans were always a nightmare.

After years of filling in various uncomfortable and unyielding pieces of non-flattering denim, I gave up. I haven't been wearing jeans for years – I don't even own a pair. Is it less fulfilling for my life? No.

What a lot of nonsense.

To all those environmentally conscious Eco warriors who have brought London to a halt: you know that the worst thing for toxic emissions is a stationary engine, don't you?

And that thanks to you thousands of Londoners – including many downtown children whose families can't afford to take them on vacation this week – will repeatedly breathe in the amount of traffic smoke they normally do.

Save the Big Ben from the catastrophe

The terrible fire in Notre Dame is a salutary reminder of the deep emotions that evoke iconic monuments.

A good example is the Palace of Westminster. No matter how majestic it is, this great neo-gothic landmark, just like the democracy it represents, desperately needs renovation.

It is littered with rot and asbestos, contaminated with vermin, the plumbing is pre-war – and the whole thing is a huge fire hazard.

In the past decade, more than 40 fires have broken out within the walls. It is not a question of & # 39; if & # 39; rather when.

Politicians warned yesterday that parliament (photo) runs the risk of being hit by fire just like Notre Dame, because it has risen forty times in four years.

Politicians warned yesterday that parliament (photo) runs the risk of being hit by fire just like Notre Dame, because it has risen forty times in four years.

Politicians warned yesterday that parliament (photo) runs the risk of being hit by fire just like Notre Dame, because it has risen forty times in four years.

And yet, when a restoration program is suggested, the response is one of disgust: how can we possibly afford large sums of money (latest estimates put the cost of the works at around £ 3.5 billion) on MPs when public confidence in the political low point?

But that is not the point. MPs come and go: this is about the nation.

The Houses of Parliament are so much more than the people who work there, just as Notre Dame is so much more than a Catholic church.

It does not matter how broken our democracy is: if we do not want the Big Ben clock tower to fall like the Notre Dame spire, we must take action.