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Sand octopus uses its tentacles to nestle in the ocean floor and hide from predators

Dig in! Incredible moment, sand octopus uses its tentacles to nestle in the ocean floor and hide from predators

  • The sand octopus twists with its tentacles to create a hole seven centimeters lower
  • The octopus uses a funnel to shoot water jets into the sand to make a hole
  • It is sinking into the ocean floor and disappearing into Port Phillip Bay, Australia

A sand octopus is filmed with its tentacles to create a hole in the ocean floor and disappear as a disguise technique to hide from its predators.

Marine biologist Jules Casey encountered the octopus while diving in Port Phillip Bay, Australia.

Footage shows the animal moving over the seabed before it curls its tentacles and bury itself.

A sand octopus was filmed moving over the seabed in Port Phillip Bay, Australia

A sand octopus was filmed moving over the seabed in Port Phillip Bay, Australia

The sand octopus eventually disappears when it undergoes sand.

This octopus, originating from the waters around the Great Australian Bight and Tasmania, uses unique techniques to hide from predators.

The sand octopus gradually disappears as its tentacles construct a seven-inch hollow

The sand octopus gradually disappears as its tentacles construct a seven-inch hollow

It slowly goes into hiding as a disguise technique to hide from predators

It slowly goes into hiding as a disguise technique to hide from predators

The animal (photo) is filmed as it wriggles its tentacles while burying itself in the ocean floor

It starts with its siphon or funnel to shoot water jets into the sand and then digs with its arms in the hole.

The sand octopus then builds a seven centimeter hole and extends two arms to the surface as a ‘chimney’ to breathe through.

The animal is thought to have no color-changing organs found in other octopus species and this technique uses this disguise technique instead

The animal is thought to have no color-changing organs found in other octopus species and this technique uses this disguise technique instead

The sand octopus bury itself. It is native to the waters around the Great Australian Bight and Tasmania

The sand octopus bury itself. It is native to the waters around the Great Australian Bight and Tasmania

It will release a kind of mucus to hold the walls of the cave in place

It will shed some sort of mucus to hold the walls in place and pull in its ventilating tentacles to appear completely buried.

The southern sand octopus is thought to lack color-changing organs, known as chromatophores, that other octopus species use to camouflage themselves against predators.

Instead, it uses this digging technique during the day and pops up again at night.

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