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Sam Newman defends the role in the Nicky Winmar saga after the iconic photo WASN’T claimed about racism

Defending his role in Nicky Winmar saga, Sam Newman says he was ‘just an innocent bystander’ when the iconic photo of the native player WAS NOT alleged about fighting racism

  • Sam Newman said he was an ‘innocent bystander’ in the Nicky Winmar saga
  • Winmar claimed that Newman’s You Can’t Be Serious podcast tarnished his legacy
  • Newman, Mike Sheahan and Don Scott attended a mediation session on Friday
  • They signed an apology and admitted that their comments had ‘damaged’ Winmar’s representative

Sam Newman says he was an ‘innocent bystander’ when claimed on his podcast. Nicky Winmar’s iconic jersey lifting photo was not about racism.

Newman, Hawthorn, great Don Scott and journalist Mike Sheahan asked the meaning behind Winmar pointing to his skin in a 1993 game for St Kilda against Collingwood during an episode of the podcast You Canot Be Serious in June.

Winmar pursued legal action against Newman, Scott and Sheahan over the conversation, accusing the group of having racially vilified him, tainted his estate and attempted to rewrite native history.

The group met on Friday for a six-hour mediation session, with Newman speaking The Herald Sun. the meeting was successful.

Sam Newman has claimed to be an 'innocent bystander' in the Nicky Winmar saga

Sam Newman has claimed to be an ‘innocent bystander’ in the Nicky Winmar saga

Nicky Winmar claimed that Newman's You Can't Be Serious podcast tarnished his legacy

Nicky Winmar claimed that Newman's You Can't Be Serious podcast tarnished his legacy

Nicky Winmar claimed that Newman’s You Can’t Be Serious podcast tarnished his legacy

“He (Winmar) said he felt racially guilty about the fact that we discussed it and that he didn’t take what he said as the facts,” Newman said.

The former Geelong veteran said the group accepted Winmar’s perspective in their mediation, but claimed he hadn’t started the conversation in the first place.

“I’m just saying I didn’t bring up that discussion. You (Scott) and him there (Sheahan) who is not here, who has jumped off the ship, you brought all that up and I was just an innocent bystander for once, ”he said.

Newman was vocal to naysayers who criticized his opinion and called Sheahan again for stopping the podcast in the aftermath of the saga.

“These people who are the moral referees of what’s wrong and right in the community and think they can tell me (or) anyone who has an opinion because you have an opinion about someone of a different race, don’t you make a racist, ‘he said.

Each of the men signed a formal apology on Friday, admitting that the podcast had “ damaged ” Nicky’s reputation and confirmed that the photo actually captured Winmar against discrimination.

Winmar and photographer Wayne Ludbey, who captured the iconic moment after a 1993 match between Collingwood and St Kilda, were outraged by the three men's comments

Winmar and photographer Wayne Ludbey, who captured the iconic moment after a 1993 match between Collingwood and St Kilda, were outraged by the three men's comments

Winmar and photographer Wayne Ludbey, who captured the iconic moment after a 1993 match between Collingwood and St Kilda, were outraged by the three men’s comments

An apology letter, seen by Daily Mail Australia, said: ‘During our June 23, 2020 podcast, we spoke of Nicky lifting his jersey and pointing at his skin at the end of the 1993 Collingwood and St Kilda race in which he had been racial abused.

“We recognize that what Nicky did was an act of native pride and resistance. It was also a strong statement of solidarity for indigenous Australians subject to racism and defamation.

“Any other suggestion was incorrect. We have thought deeply about the problems.

“We accept that what was said during the podcast has damaged Nicky’s reputation. We understand that many people would consider what we said to be racially discriminatory against Nicky and native Australians.

“For all these reasons, we sincerely apologize to Nicky Winmar and the native Australians in general.”

Newman, Sheahan and Scott attended a six-hour mediation session with Winmar in Melbourne on Friday and signed an official apology, admitting that the comments during the podcast had 'damaged Nicky's reputation'

Newman, Sheahan and Scott attended a six-hour mediation session with Winmar in Melbourne on Friday and signed an official apology, admitting that the comments during the podcast had 'damaged Nicky's reputation'

Newman, Sheahan and Scott attended a six-hour mediation session with Winmar in Melbourne on Friday and signed an official apology, admitting that the comments during the podcast had ‘damaged Nicky’s reputation’

Sam Newman (left), Mike Sheahan (center) and Don Scott (right) cast doubt on Winmar's stance against racism in which he was captured lifting his jersey and pointing to his dark skin - stating that it was really about the club that had 'guts'

Sam Newman (left), Mike Sheahan (center) and Don Scott (right) cast doubt on Winmar's stance against racism in which he was captured lifting his jersey and pointing to his dark skin - stating that it was really about the club that had 'guts'

Sam Newman (left), Mike Sheahan (center) and Don Scott (right) cast doubt on Winmar’s stance against racism in which he was captured lifting his jersey and pointing to his dark skin – stating that it was really about the club that had ‘guts’

Rumor has it that their apology includes a $ 100,000 donation to an indigenous charity.

The group said they will remove the podcast episode in which the comments were made and pledged to make another formal apology on their next episode.

Winmar said he was happy that the problem was solved, but felt that more work needed to be done.

“I just want to say that I am black and I am proud and want to thank the rest of Australia for their support,” Winmar told The Age.

“I was very disappointed [with the comments]. The past few weeks have been very emotional. I believe in what I said. ‘

Winmar said he was happy that the problem was solved and the three men apologized, but believed more work needed to be done

Winmar said he was happy that the problem was solved and the three men apologized, but believed more work needed to be done

Winmar said he was happy that the problem was solved and the three men apologized, but believed more work needed to be done

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