Salvage company’s boss reveals master plan to clear massive tanker blocking the Suez Canal

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A Dutch businessman has unveiled a master plan to rescue a freighter trapped in the Suez Canal, blocking shipping and causing chaos.

The Ever Given, a Panamanian-flagged ship that carries cargo between Asia and Europe, ran aground on Tuesday in the narrow channel that runs between Africa and the Sinai Peninsula.

It has now been five days since it got stuck and all attempts to dislodge the ship have proved unsuccessful.

Peter Berdowski, CEO of Boskalis, the salvage company hired to haul the Ever Given, said the company hoped to pull the container ship off within days with a combination of heavy tugs, dredging and high water.

Peter Berdowski (right) CEO of Boskalis, the salvage company hired to make the Ever Given.  He said the company wants to harness the power of the tugs, dredging and tides, which he said are expected to be up to 20 inches higher on Saturday.

Peter Berdowski (right) CEO of Boskalis, the salvage company hired to make the Ever Given. He said the company wants to harness the power of the tugs, dredging and tides, which he said are expected to be up to 20 inches higher on Saturday.

Analysts say an estimated £ 290 million in trade is held back every hour the ship jams across the canal

Analysts say an estimated £ 290 million in trade is held back every hour the ship jams across the canal

Analysts say an estimated £ 290 million in trade is held back every hour the ship jams across the canal

More than 200 ships were caught in the logjam after the Ever Given ran aground amid high winds on Tuesday

More than 200 ships were caught in the logjam after the Ever Given ran aground amid high winds on Tuesday

More than 200 ships were caught in the logjam after the Ever Given ran aground amid high winds on Tuesday

He told Nieuwsuur on Friday evening that the front of the ship is stuck in sandy clay, but the back “has not been completely pushed into the clay, which is a good thing because you can use the rear to pull it loose”. ‘

Berdowski said two large tugs were heading for the canal and are expected to arrive over the weekend.

He said the company aims to harness the power of the tugs, dredging and tides, which he said are expected to be up to 20 inches higher on Saturday.

“The combination of the boats and tugs that we will have there, more soil dredged and the high tide, we hope that will be enough to get the ship somewhere free early next week,” he said.

If that doesn’t work, the company will remove hundreds of containers from the front of the ship to make it lighter, effectively lifting the ship to make it easier to pull off, Berdowski said.

There was already a crane on the way that can lift the containers from the ship, he said.

An official with the Suez Canal Authority said the authority planned to make at least two attempts on Saturday to free the ship when the tide goes down.

The officer spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to brief journalists.

Egyptian authorities have banned media access to the site.

The salvage mission shifted focus to the ship’s stranded bow after some progress was made in freeing the stern, channel service provider Leth Agencies said Saturday.

Analysts say an estimated £ 290 million in trade is held back every hour the ship jams across the canal

Analysts say an estimated £ 290 million in trade is held back every hour the ship jams across the canal

Analysts say an estimated £ 290 million in trade is held back every hour the ship jams across the canal

Two tugs are participating in the raft operation being conducted to liberate the Ever Given, a container ship owned by the Evergreen Marine Corporation, currently trapped in the Suez Canal. The state-run Suez Canal

Egyptian Prime Minister Mustafa Madbouly called the ship’s predicament “a very extraordinary incident” in his initial public comments about the blockage at a press conference in Cairo. He said the head of the channel authority, Lieutenant General Osama Rabei, would hold a press conference in the city of Suez on Saturday to share more details about the operation.

Prolonged closure of the critical waterway would cause delays in the global transport chain.

According to official figures, about 19,000 ships passed through the canal last year.

About 10 percent of world trade flows through the canal, which is especially crucial for the transportation of oil.

The closure could affect oil and gas shipments to Europe from the Middle East.

It remained unclear how long the block would last. Even after the reopening of the channel connecting factories in Asia to consumers in Europe, waiting containers are likely to arrive at busy ports, facing additional delays before unloading.

Apparently anticipating long delays, the stranded ship’s owners have diverted a sister ship, the Ever Greet, on a course around Africa, according to satellite data.

Others are also being diverted. According to satellite data from MarineTraffic.com, the liquefied natural gas tanker Pan Americas changed course in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, now heading south to go around the southernmost tip of Africa.