Sainsbury & # 39; s pull boxes with the first mobile phone scanner store

Using an application linked to the Nectar card, Ruth scans Sainsbury products with her phone

Britain is famous for being a nation of queuers, but now buyers have had the opportunity to choose products, skip the line at the cash register and simply fold.

In a first for a UK supermarket, Sainsbury has developed a smartphone app that allows customers to scan items from shelves, pack them in their bags and then leave.

Instead of going to the cashier, they hold their phone at a point of payment near the store exit and receive a digital receipt that says, "Now you can leave the store."

After a small test in a store at London's Euston station, the system has been fully deployed at a branch near the Clapham North subway station in south London.

Using an application linked to the Nectar card, Ruth scans Sainsbury products with her phone

Using an application linked to the Nectar card, Ruth scans Sainsbury products with her phone

Items go directly to the shopping bag, without visiting a box

Items go directly to the shopping bag, without visiting a box

Ruth leaves Sainsbury & # 39; s with her purchases

Ruth leaves Sainsbury & # 39; s with her purchases

The items go directly to the shopping bag, without the need for customers to visit a box

Users must download an application and link it to a Nectar loyalty card. The system uses Apple Pay to receive payments. Items with age restrictions, such as alcohol, still require authorization from a staff member.

Sainsbury denies that the plan was conceived as a means to reduce personnel. & # 39; Nobody will lose their jobs, absolutely not. The power of this is to combine people and technology, "said Clodagh Moriarty, digital director of Sainsbury.

While the supermarket does not expect an increase in theft, and retains conventional boxes, it will increase the number of cameras and security personnel to deter store thieves. However, Ms. Moriarty said that the biggest problem had been the guilt of customers in skipping the box.

"They have a kind of nervousness that they are doing something wrong," he said.

Customers can keep their phone at Sainsbury's SmartShop payment point and retire

Customers can keep their phone at Sainsbury's SmartShop payment point and retire

Customers can keep their phone at Sainsbury's SmartShop payment point and retire

Client James Watts, 40, welcomed tail-free technology, but expressed concern for the welfare of the softer items. "If that means you do not have to queue, that's absolutely brilliant," he said.

"The only thing I would do differently is to use a basket, without putting things directly in the bag, because you're just throwing things, the heavy items are on top of the avocados." Amber Taft, 28, said: "It does not feel natural, if you're just seeing someone in a hallway putting an item in your bag, you do not necessarily know if they've scanned it or not."

The application is based on the existing Smartshop technology, which is used in 68 Sainsbury supermarkets, where customers scan their products but still pay cash.

Amazon has a convenience store without a box in the US city of Seattle, but this store is the first of its kind in Britain.

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