Sackler family breaks silence: heir to Purdue Pharma fortune plays victim despite 400,000 deaths

A Sackler heir broke his silence during a show-deaf interview with Vanity Fair, in which he openly sympathized with what he and his relatives endured while making almost no mention of the hundreds of thousands killed by opioids.

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David Sackler speaks out in the current issue of Vanity Fair about the & # 39; vitriolic hyperbole & # 39; and & # 39; endless castigation & # 39; who has seen his family in the midst of the ongoing opioid crisis.

He then provides an example in his search for public sympathy, saying: & I have three young children. My four-year-old came home from kindergarten and asked, "Why do my friends tell me that the work of our family kills people?"

David and his family earned $ 4 billion between 2008 and 2016 from selling prescription drugs through the family-owned company, Purdue Pharma, according to court documents.

More specifically, the profits they gained from the sale of opioids such as OxyContin, the small but powerful pill responsible for the eternal windfall of money from the Sackler family and an unprecedented epidemic.

An epidemic for which David refuses to accept any blame by denying: & # 39; The idea that the Sacklers were in charge of the operation. That's just not true. & # 39;

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Joss Sackler

Richard Sackler

Richard Sackler

Family values: David Sackler, whose father Richard is named as the man responsible for the emergence of OxyContin in multiple lawsuits, has spoken with Vanity Fair (David & # 39; s wife Joss left, his father Richard right)

David's wife Joss celebrated her husband because she agreed with Vanity Fair

David's wife Joss celebrated her husband because she agreed with Vanity Fair

David's wife Joss celebrated her husband because she agreed with Vanity Fair

Trader: The Sackler family paid themselves $ 4,273,489,182 (above) in gains from opioid sales in 2008 and 2016, while more than 235,000 Americans died from opioid overdoses

Trader: The Sackler family paid themselves $ 4,273,489,182 (above) in gains from opioid sales in 2008 and 2016, while more than 235,000 Americans died from opioid overdoses

Trader: The Sackler family paid themselves $ 4,273,489,182 (above) in gains from opioid sales in 2008 and 2016, while more than 235,000 Americans died from opioid overdoses

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Attorneys-generals from more than 40 states who have filed a lawsuit against Purdue Pharma and the family do not share David's faith, with one member being specifically referred to as the alleged architect behind the emergence of OxyContin in multiple colors – Davids father Richard Sackler.

He served as president and president of Purdue Pharma at the same time that sales of OxyContin started to rise.

One lawsuit explained how Richard bragged about the profit the company would pick from the beginning at OxyContin and told the guests at one party: "The launch of OxyContin tablets will be followed by a blizzard of rules that will bury the competition The prescription blizzard will be so deep, dense and white. & # 39;

According to Forbes, the family is worth $ 13 billion, but as David complains, no one will take his money anymore, because the family has been so toxic since their controversial marketing and aggressive pressure on doctors to prescribe OxyContin, these different lawsuits, and The New Piece. Yorker of 2017.

The deaths caused by the epidemic are a side issue for David during the interview, where he makes almost no mention of those who lost their lives in the crisis.

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Bethany Mclean, who sat down with David for the piece, notes that it is only in the interview that he recognizes those who have been killed because of the drugs that Purdue produces and markets.

David also succeeds in giving that opportunity to explain the innocence of his family and to reject what he sees as a cruel and ruthless crowd who has wrongly targeted his family, especially his father and the brothers of that man .

& # 39; We have so much empathy. I'm sorry we didn't start that. We feel absolutely awful & # 39 ;, says Sackler.

His empathy, however, does not extend far enough to end his remarks, but out of respect for the dead, with David adding: & # 39; Facts will show that we did not cause the crisis, but we want to help. & # 39 ;

David, who manages the family's mutual fund, explains later in the interview: & # 39; To claim that OxyContin started, this is not in line with history. & # 39;

Brothers Jonathan, left and Richard, right. Richard led Purdue from 1999 to 2003 and oversaw a large portion of OxyContin's increasing sales because it was advertised incorrectly
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Brothers Jonathan, left and Richard, right. Richard led Purdue from 1999 to 2003 and oversaw a large portion of OxyContin's increasing sales because it was advertised incorrectly

Brothers Jonathan, left and Richard, right. Richard led Purdue from 1999 to 2003 and oversaw much of OxyContin's rising sales while it was advertised

Brothers Jonathan, left and Richard, right. Richard led Purdue from 1999 to 2003 and oversaw much of OxyContin's rising sales while it was advertised

Brothers Jonathan, left and Richard, right. Richard led Purdue from 1999 to 2003 and oversaw a large part of the rising sales figures of OxyContin while advertising

The deceased Mortimer Sackler with his widow, Dame Theresa Sackler, who belongs to the family being sued

The deceased Mortimer Sackler with his widow, Dame Theresa Sackler, who belongs to the family being sued

The deceased Mortimer Sackler with his widow, Dame Theresa Sackler, who belongs to the family being sued

Mortimer David Alfons Sackler, 47, with his wife, Jaqueline. Their Hamptons house can be seen in Vogue
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Mortimer David Alfons Sackler, 47, with his wife, Jaqueline. Their Hamptons house can be seen in Vogue

Jacqueline Sackler and Ivanka Trump in 2007

Jacqueline Sackler and Ivanka Trump in 2007

Mortimer David Alfons Sackler, 47, with his wife, Jaqueline. Their Hamptons house can be seen in Vogue. Jacqueline is shown, with Ivanka Trump in 2007

The Sacklers are said to have pushed high doses of the painkiller Oxycontin, hoping to collect anti-overdose drug NARCAN in accordance with one of the many lawsuits filed against them in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts,

That lawsuit claims that Purdue Pharma and members of the Sackler family knew that patients with higher doses of Oxycontin had an increased risk of serious side effects, including addiction, for long periods of time, but they continued to promote the high doses because they yielded the most profit. .

A copy of the submission obtained by DailyMail.com showed that between 2008 and 2016, the Sackler family added $ 4.2 billion to their already huge fortune in gains just gained from selling prescription opioids.

Richard Sackler, a son of a founder of Purdue Pharma and his former president, wrote an e-mail to corporate officials in 2008 to measure our performance against Rx & # 39; s by giving strength, higher sizes. to higher strengths & # 39 ;, according to the submission.

Jonathan and Mortimer Sackler were also copied in the email according to the new revelations.

Richard Sackler has always denied that he was involved in the company's marketing activities.

After making billions that sold opoid, Purdue Pharma even considered selling NARCAN drug for overdose.

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That submission showed a potential plan to & # 39; long-term script users & # 39; to study & # 39; target-end patients & # 39; better understandable for NARCAN.

The plan never progressed but appeared in a 2014 presentation to corporate officials, including a family member of Sackler, which also stated that & # 39; pain treatment and addiction are naturally linked & # 39; and that & # 39; there is a possibility to expand our offer to put an end to pain relief. & # 39;

The sackers were painted as a rich family who became richer, while overdoses shot up and the opioid epidemic flooded the country.

Ilene is the oldest daughter of Mortimer. She was depicted in 1999 with the opening of the Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology

Ilene is the oldest daughter of Mortimer. She was depicted in 1999 with the opening of the Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology

Ilene is the oldest daughter of Mortimer. She was depicted in 1999 with the opening of the Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology

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A Purdue spokesperson criticized the lawsuit and denied the allegations, told the New York Times: & None of the documents cited by the Attorney General support her fictional story that the company was only interested in promoting higher doses & # 39 said Robert Josephson spokesperson. .

The complaint states that eight members of the Sackler family (Richard, Beverly, David, Ilene, Jonathan, Kathe, Mortimer and Theresa) & # 39; their families have paid billions of dollars from the sale of opioids & # 39 ;.

The exact number is listed as $ 4,273,489,182, although it is noted that & # 39; the list of payments if probably incomplete and not complete & # 39; is.

It was not only the family that benefited, but also members of the council took home $ 600,000 for their work with the company according to the complaint.

Members of the family controlling Connecticut-based Purdue Pharma are also defendants in a lawsuit filed by Suffolk County in New York. There is also a massive consolidated federal case that is taking place in Ohio.

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More than 1,000 government agencies have sued Purdue, along with other drug makers and distributors, who claim they are partially guilty of an overdose crisis that resulted in a record 72,000 deaths in 2017.

The majority of those deaths were from legal or unauthorized opioids.

The company's documents at the heart of Massachusetts' claims can also be evidence in Ohio court cases that are being reviewed by a federal judge.

The allegations have already begun to tarnish a name best known for its generosity in museums around the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, which has a Sackler wing, and London's Tate Modern.

The name Sackler is also on a Smithsonian gallery, a wing of galleries at the Royal Academy of Arts in London and a museum at Beijing University in Beijing.

Numbers: Adapted deaths from drug overdoses as described in a graph that show the magnitude of the opioid crisis

Numbers: Adapted deaths from drug overdoses as described in a graph that show the magnitude of the opioid crisis

Numbers: Adapted deaths from drug overdoses as described in a graph that show the magnitude of the opioid crisis

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In March, a group of protesters led by photographer Nan Goldin descended on the Sackler wing on the Met to embarrass the family

In March, a group of protesters led by photographer Nan Goldin descended on the Sackler wing on the Met to embarrass the family

In March, a group of protesters led by photographer Nan Goldin descended on the Sackler wing on the Met to embarrass the family

The most famous and generous donor of the family, Arthur M. Sackler, died nearly a decade before OxyContin was released.

In the lawsuit filed last year, the Massachusetts Attorney General's office went after the members of the Sackler family and Purdue, structured as a partnership and not publicly traded.

The company's flagship product, OxyContin, was the first of a generation of drugs to use a narcotic painkiller in a time-release form. That meant that each pill contained a greater amount of drugs than other versions and that abusers could get a more intense high if they beat the time release.

The state claims that Richard Sackler, a son of a company founder and at that time a senior vice president for Purdue, as well as other family members, pushed to sell OxyContin even if they knew it could cause problems.

Kathe Sackler, 70, lives in New York City and owns property in Connecticut with her wife

Kathe Sackler, 70, lives in New York City and owns property in Connecticut with her wife

Kathe Sackler, 70, lives in New York City and owns property in Connecticut with her wife

When the drug was first sold in 1996, the charge said, Sackler told the sales team that the launch of OxyContin Tablets will be followed by a blizzard of regulations that will bury the competition.

In 2007, the company and three current and former executives declared guilty of criminal prosecution for misleading regulators, doctors, and patients about the drug's addiction risk.

The company agreed to fines of $ 634 million.

The following year, according to the Massachusetts court case, the company launched a new version of the drug that was intended to crush abusers.

It did this without first conducting tests and despite a warning from the company's CEO that the new version won't prevent patients from simply taking too many pills.

Purdue had previously responded to the Massachusetts application.

& # 39; In a hurry to vilify a single manufacturer whose drugs represent less than 2 percent of opioid pain prescriptions instead of doing the hard work to resolve a complex public health crisis, the complaint aggravates essential facts and cynically combines opioid drugs with illegal heroin and fentanyl, & the company said.

STATEMENT BY PURDUE BOARD PRESIDENT

Together with all my colleagues at Purdue Pharma, I am deeply concerned about the public health crisis of opioid addiction. Our hearts go out to the families and communities affected by the crisis. But from my experience in different industries, no complex social problem – let alone a challenge like this public health crisis – can be effectively resolved through litigation.

The various Sackler family members I have met since they joined the Purdue Pharma Council last July are good people and their dedication to giving back is truly admirable. The mischaracterizations of them in the process are worse than unfair and do not resemble the people I have come to know and admire.

Purdue is also a good company with a management team dedicated to making medicines that help patients and doctors. The company and its board of directors will work diligently towards a fair resolution of current lawsuits and we will continue to support solutions that can help tackle the opioid addiction crisis.

Purdue has been investing for decades in constructive solutions to the complex problem of addiction and we want to expand these efforts and do even more. Purdue worked for more than a decade and spent hundreds of millions of dollars to develop a new, deterrent formula from OxyContin, and it was the first opioid approved by the FDA with deterrent properties. Beginning as early as 2001, Purdue has also collaborated with law enforcement to combat the abuse and abuse of prescription drugs and funded programs to inform high school students about the dangers of using prescribed opioid abuse. And Purdue has worked hard to deliver on its commitments under its Corporate Integrity Agreement (CIA), under close federal supervision, and successfully fulfilled all its obligations in 2013.

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