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Russian “espionage satellite falls apart in space”

NASA expert believes Russian espionage satellite breaks up in space when “propellant gas explodes” after the US Air Force discovers ten fragments of the wreck

  • Dr. Jonathan McDowell believes the Kosmos-2491 has left his job
  • A US Air Force project discovered 10 fragments of the 2491 military satellite
  • US is increasingly concerned about Russia’s growing presence in space

A NASA expert believes that ten pieces of wreckage discovered in orbit prove that an extremely secret Russian espionage satellite has fallen apart in space.

Dr. Jonathan McDowell claimed that the Cosmos-2491, a satellite built in Moscow, fell apart in orbit around mid-December.

The space probe was believed to be part of the Nivelir project, a Russian program for producing maneuverable satellites that were used to inspect other space objects.

“In December 2013, Russia … launched three military communications satellites and a fourth, initially unannounced, charge, later recognized with the cover name Kosmos-2491,” astronomer Dr. Jonathan McDowell wrote on Twitter.

“It seemed to end his mission in 2014. The satellite made an orbit change around 1321 UTC on December 23, 2019 and 10 rubble objects have now been cataloged. ‘

The impression of an artist shows the Kosmos-2491 flying above the earth. An expert has claimed that the Kosmos-2491, a satellite built in Moscow, was lost in mid-December

The impression of an artist shows the Kosmos-2491 flying above the earth. An expert has claimed that the Kosmos-2491, a satellite built in Moscow, was lost in mid-December

Dr. tweet McDowell came after the US Air Force Project Space reported that he had observed 10 fragments of what they believed to be the remains of the Kosmos-2491 military satellite.

The Kremlin did not comment on the loss of the probe.

Despite the discovery, Dr. McDowell not sure why it suddenly fell apart.

One of his theories is that the probe was intentionally removed.

He also said that leftover propellant gas could have blown up the fuel tank or the object collided with a piece of space rock.

In 2014, amateur astronomers followed the unnatural maneuvers of what was then called object 2014-28E.

Many feared the start of a new extraterrestrial arms race, but Russian space travel leader Oleg Ostapenko insisted that the 2491 was not a “killer satellite,” as was rumored.

People walk in front of a monument in honor of the launch of the first artificial satellite - Sputnik 1, near the Rizhskaya metro station in Moscow on January 14, 2020

People walk in front of a monument in honor of the launch of the first artificial satellite - Sputnik 1, near the Rizhskaya metro station in Moscow on January 14, 2020

People walk in front of a monument in honor of the launch of the first artificial satellite – Sputnik 1, near the Rizhskaya metro station in Moscow on January 14, 2020

‘Whatever it is, [Object 2014-28E] looks experimental, “said Patricia Lewis, research director at think tank Chatham House and an expert in space security, the FT in 2014.

“It could have a number of functions, some civil and some military. A possibility is for a sort of grab. Another are kinetic pellets that shoot at another satellite. Or maybe there is a satellite-to-satellite cyber attack or jamming. ”

The US is increasingly concerned about the growing opportunities of Russia and China in space.

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