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Russian billionaire offers to buy two statues that BLM demonstrators want to remove from American cities

A Russian billionaire has offered to purchase two historic American statues that BLM demonstrators are seeking to remove from public view because of their links to racism and colonialism.

48-year-old businessman Andrey Filatov, who runs the Art Russe Foundation – with an emphasis on preserving Soviet-era art – has made an offer to purchase two statues that U.S. officials have supported for removal.

The statue of former President Theodore Roosevelt outside the American Museum of Natural History in New York City and an image of the first governor of Alaska’s Russian colonies, Alexander Baranov, found in Sitka, Alaska, are both marked for uprooting.

And now it seems that the banned images may not remain in the US, with the potential Russian buyer, Mr. Filatov, saying he would export them to St. Petersburg, Russia, where they would be celebrated for the ‘positive sign that both men had left reports on Russia CNN.

The New York Museum of Natural History announced last month that the statue of President Theodore Roosevelt, which has stood at the entrance since 1940, will be removed

The New York Museum of Natural History announced last month that the statue of President Theodore Roosevelt, which has stood at the entrance since 1940, will be removed

A spokesman for the Art Russe Foundation told the broadcaster: “We have deep respect and appreciation for individuals who contributed to Russia’s development and were associated with the history of our country.

Both the 26th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt, and the Governor of Russian Settlements in North America, Alexander Baranov, were statesmen who left their positive mark on the history of Russia. We therefore see the need to preserve their memory for future generations. ‘

The images are just two of the hundreds that spark controversy in the U.S. as Black Lives Matter protesters call on the nation to face its troubled history, with many confederate monuments in the south.

The New York Museum of Natural History announced last month that the statue of President Theodore Roosevelt, which has stood at the entrance since 1940, will be removed after approval from Mayor of New York, Bill de Blasio and Governor Andrew Cuomo.

Alexander Baranov established and acted as governor of the first Russian colonies in Alaska and was the general manager of the Russian American Company. His statue in Sitka, Alaska

Alexander Baranov established and acted as governor of the first Russian colonies in Alaska and was the general manager of the Russian American Company. His statue in Sitka, Alaska

Alexander Baranov established and acted as governor of the first Russian colonies in Alaska and was the general manager of the Russian American Company. His statue in Sitka, Alaska

The image shows Roosevelt flanked by an Indian man and an African man riding horses, suggesting they are “ submissive and racially inferior, ” Blasio said in a statement.

The Republican and 26th President of the United States, whose face on Mount Rushmore is depicted alongside George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln, is credited with laying the groundwork for the modern Democratic party.

His progressive policy smoothed the playing field between the rich and the poor, a mantle that continued in the modern liberalism of his nephew, the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Ellen V. Futter, the president of the museum, said the removal was more about the “hierarchical composition” of the image than a reflection on Roosevelt.

In Russian history, Roosevelt is remembered as a peacemaker – he negotiated with the Portsmouth Treaty to end the 18-month war between Japan and Russia in 1904. Two years later, he received the Nobel Peace Prize for his actions.

Businessman Andrey Filatov, 48, who runs the Art Russe Foundation - with an emphasis on preserving Soviet-era art - has made an offer to purchase two American statues

Businessman Andrey Filatov, 48, who runs the Art Russe Foundation - with an emphasis on preserving Soviet-era art - has made an offer to purchase two American statues

Businessman Andrey Filatov, 48, who runs the Art Russe Foundation – with an emphasis on preserving Soviet-era art – has made an offer to purchase two American statues

Alexander Baranov (1747 – 1819), is a lesser-known figure in American history who established and acted as Governor of the first Russian colonies in Alaska and was General Manager of the Russian-American Company.

A bronze statue of the leader stands in front of Harrigan Centennial Hall on an island named after him, Baranov Island, in Sitka, Alaska, where it was erected in 1989 to celebrate the role of trade in Sitka’s past.

Below the statue is a plaque: “So that we may live in this region in friendship and peace forever.”

A petition for the image to be broken, signed by 2,500, said that Baranov’s role in promoting trade in the city was synonymous with the suppression of Alaskans and colonization.

It says: “Alexander Baranof (Baranov) was a Russian settler who came to Sitka, Alaska without an invitation to enrich himself, his company and his country.

“In 1804, he led the armed attack on the local Tlingit people who have lived in this area for over 10,000 years.”

In a letter to Sitka City Hall and the American Museum of Natural History, the Art Russe Foundation said that it had offered to buy both for an undisclosed amount, stating, “monetary value is being negotiated.”

Ukraine-born Filatov, a master chess player and president of the Russian chess federation, made his fortune in the transportation and port industry and has an estimated worth of $ 1.1 billion, reports CNN.

Filatov founded the Art Russe Foundation in 2012 to collect and preserve art from the Soviet era, between 1917 and 1991. The art is on loan to museums and galleries.

He is co-owner of Globaltrans, a private rail operator, and founded Tuloma, an investment company, in 2013.

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