Russia warns that the build-up of American weapons near its borders entails the risk of a recurrence of the Cuban missile crisis

Washington's deployment of land-based missile systems near Russian borders could lead to an impasse similar to the Cuban missile crisis, one official warned.

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Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov threatened an escalation to the limit & # 39; if the weapon systems remain in place.

The Kremlin has taken a critical stance on US plans to deploy missile systems in Eastern Europe and on Washington's withdrawal from the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces (INF) arms control regulations.

Ryabkov said: & # 39; If it is really about deploying such systems on land, the situation will not only be complicated, but also escalate to the extreme. & # 39;

American activity in Eastern Europe has increased in recent months, with the threat of military bases emerging in the region.

The deployment of Washington & # 39; s land-based missile systems near Russian borders could lead to a stalemate similar to the Cuban missile crisis, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov warned. Pictured: Russian leader Vladimir Putin

The deployment of Washington & # 39; s land-based missile systems near Russian borders could lead to a stalemate similar to the Cuban missile crisis, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov warned. Pictured: Russian leader Vladimir Putin

The remarks of a Russian official came when Admiral Gorshkov's frigate of the navy arrived in the port of Havana today
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The remarks of a Russian official came when Admiral Gorshkov's frigate of the navy arrived in the port of Havana today

The remarks of a Russian official came when Admiral Gorshkov's frigate of the navy arrived in the port of Havana today

A Russian S-300 air defense system launches a rocket during military exercises at the Ashuluk shooting range near Astrakhan, Russia

A Russian S-300 air defense system launches a rocket during military exercises at the Ashuluk shooting range near Astrakhan, Russia

A Russian S-300 air defense system launches a rocket during military exercises at the Ashuluk shooting range near Astrakhan, Russia

Last week, the Pentagon approved $ 250 million in military aid to Ukraine, which is still at war with Russian-backed separatists in the east of the country over the annexation of Crimea in 2014.

The Ministry of Defense said the support would consist of sniper rifles, a missile grenade launcher, radiators for anti-guns, electronic warfare detection systems, night vision and military medical supplies.

Earlier this month, President Trump said he would redirect another 1,000 US troops out of 52,000 in Germany to Poland, but did not do enough to commit to a new US base in the country.

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The US accused Russia of developing and deploying a cruise missile that violates provisions of the INF Pact prohibiting the production, testing and deployment of land-based cruise and ballistic missiles with a range of 500 to 5,500 kilometers (310) up to 3,410 miles).

In February, the US announced its intention to withdraw from the INF, clearing the way for termination within six months unless Moscow returns to compliance. Russia has denied any violation and has accused the US of breaking the pact.

A Russian S-300 air defense system launches a rocket during military exercises on the Ashuluk

A Russian S-300 air defense system launches a rocket during military exercises on the Ashuluk

A Russian S-300 air defense system launches a rocket during military exercises on the Ashuluk

President Donald Trump led 1,000 US troops from Germany to Poland as part of a military build-up in Eastern Europe

President Donald Trump led 1,000 US troops from Germany to Poland as part of a military build-up in Eastern Europe

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President Donald Trump led 1,000 US troops from Germany to Poland as part of a military build-up in Eastern Europe

A Russian naval detachment, led by the frigate Admiral Gorshkov, arrived in Havana today in times of high tension between the Communist island, the US and the Kremlin

A Russian naval detachment, led by the frigate Admiral Gorshkov, arrived in Havana today in times of high tension between the Communist island, the US and the Kremlin

A Russian naval detachment, led by the frigate Admiral Gorshkov, arrived in Havana today in times of high tension between the Communist island, the US and the Kremlin

President Vladimir Putin subsequently suspended Russia's obligations under the INF treaty and the detention would remain in force until the US ends its violations of the treaty or until it expires.

Putin has said that he does not want an arms race with the United States, but that he has no choice but to act if Washington uses new rockets in Europe, which he says can hit Moscow in ten to twelve minutes.

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Despite the fact that he said he did not want to step up the confrontation & # 39 ;, Putin also said that Russia was militarily ready for a Cuban-style missile crisis and that Donald Trump & # 39; fool & # 39; was to threaten a confrontation.

He said earlier: & (39) They (the tensions) are no reason to stir up the confrontation with the levels of the Cuban missile crisis in the 1960s. At least that is not what we want.

& # 39; It is their (US) right to think how they want. But can they count? I'm sure they can. Let them count the speed and range of the weapon systems that we develop. & # 39;

In a separate arm treaty, the new treaty for the strategic limitation of the poor (New START), signed in 2010, agreed with the US and Russia to reduce the number of nuclear warheads.

According to the terms of the Pact, each can only contain a maximum of 800 deployed or non-deployed intercontinental ballistic missiles and deploy 1,550 warheads and 700 missiles and bombers.

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Both Moscow and Washington said they had met the restrictions by the February 2018 deadline.

The Cuban missile crisis broke out in 1962 when Moscow responded to an American missile deployment in Turkey by sending ballistic missiles to Cuba, leading to an impasse that brought the world to the brink of a nuclear war.

Fidel Castro allowed the Soviet Union to deploy nuclear missiles in Cuba after America's failed attempt to overthrow him, meaning that Russia could attack almost any American city before retaliation could be undertaken.

An American soldier on his way to Patriot missile batteries deployed in Israel

An American soldier on his way to Patriot missile batteries deployed in Israel

An American soldier on his way to Patriot missile batteries deployed in Israel

Navy vessels of the Russian Federation arrive in the port of Havana today because a Kremlin employee claimed that an accumulation of American troops in Eastern Europe threatens a recurrence of the Cuban missile crisis.

Navy vessels of the Russian Federation arrive in the port of Havana today because a Kremlin employee claimed that an accumulation of American troops in Eastern Europe threatens a recurrence of the Cuban missile crisis.

Navy vessels of the Russian Federation arrive in the port of Havana today because a Kremlin employee claimed that an accumulation of American troops in Eastern Europe threatens a recurrence of the Cuban missile crisis.

How the Cuban missile crisis brought the world to the brink of nuclear armageddon in 1962

The Cuban missile crisis has brought the world as close as ever to the nuclear war in October 1962.

After America's failed attempt to overthrow Fidel Castro, the Cuban strong man allowed the Soviet Union to deploy nuclear missiles in Cuba – putting the warheads at an easily conspicuous distance from most of the US.

If Russia chose, it could launch the rockets in the US before Washington had a chance to retaliate.

Nikita Khrushchev and John F Kennedy during a historic meeting a year before the Cuban missile crisis broke out
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Nikita Khrushchev and John F Kennedy during a historic meeting a year before the Cuban missile crisis broke out

Nikita Khrushchev and John F Kennedy during a historic meeting a year before the Cuban missile crisis broke out

America had already deployed ballistic missiles in Italy and Turkey, leaving them a simple distance from Moscow.

President John F Kennedy informed the Americans during a television broadcast on October 22, 1962 that the Soviets had placed rockets on Cuba and that the US would be stirring up a blockade around the island to force Castro and Khrushchev to remove rockets.

He announced that America would be willing, if necessary, to use military force to discourage what was seen as a threat to national security – and the world waited with a breath of air.

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On October 24, 1962, another important moment came when Soviet ships on their way to Cuba approach the line of American ships enforcing the blockade. An attempt to break the blockade would most likely have resulted in a military confrontation, but the Soviet ships deteriorated.

An American invasion force prepared for an invasion of Cuba, but was eventually deposed. Kennedy (photo) showed reluctance not to attack the Soviets or Cubans

An American invasion force prepared for an invasion of Cuba, but was eventually deposed. Kennedy (photo) showed reluctance not to attack the Soviets or Cubans

An American invasion force prepared for an invasion of Cuba, but was eventually deposed. Kennedy (photo) showed reluctance not to attack the Soviets or Cubans

A flash point that could have led to a total war was when an American reconnaissance aircraft was shot down on October 27, 1962.

An American invasion force prepared for an invasion of Cuba, but was eventually deposed. The 35-year-old pilot of the downed plane, Major Rudolf Anderson, is considered the only American combat battle of the Cuban missile crisis.

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During the tense suspension, Khrushchev and Kennedy were in contact to try to prevent any military escalation between the two superpowers. On October 26, 1962, Khrushchev sent a message to Kennedy offering to remove the Cuban missiles in exchange for a promise by US leaders not to invade Cuba.

The following day Khrushchev sent a letter in which he stated that the USSR would dismantle its missiles in Cuba if the Americans were to remove their missile installations in Turkey.

Secret negotiations between Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev and JFK and between his brother Robert Kennedy, the Attorney General and the Soviet ambassador Anatoly Dobrynin led to a deal. US Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara said after the incident it was the & # 39; last Saturday he would ever see & # 39; while tensions continued to escalate.

The Soviets agreed to withdraw their rockets in exchange for America that promised not to invade Cuba. The US also secretly promised to remove obsolete rockets from Turkey. Both sides claimed victory as a way to put a positive PR spin on the crisis.

Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro enjoys a steak dinner while holding an improvised press conference at the Theresa Hotel in Harlem during his visit to New York on September 23, 1960

Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro enjoys a steak dinner while holding an improvised press conference at the Theresa Hotel in Harlem during his visit to New York on September 23, 1960

Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro enjoys a steak dinner while holding an improvised press conference at the Theresa Hotel in Harlem during his visit to New York on September 23, 1960

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news (t) Russia

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