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Akademik Lomonosov is being towed to the Russian northern port city of Murmansk in May of this year

Russia plans to tow nuclear power plant to the Arctic, despite the fact that environmentalists call it a & # 39; floating Chernobyl & # 39; to label

  • The Akademik Lomonosov has been floating by critics & # 39; floating Chernobyl & # 39; called
  • It took two years to build under Vladimir Putin's Arctic expansion plans
  • Russia hopes to tap the oil reserves of the North Pole when the springs in Siberia dry up
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Russia plans to drag a floating nuclear power plant 3000 miles through the polar circle.

The Akademik Lomonosov, by critics the & # 39; floating Chernobyl & # 39; , is under construction for almost two decades and is on its way to the small Arctic port town of Pevek.

The huge 144-meter platform currently located in Murmansk in western Russia will eventually supply electricity to settlements and companies that purchase hydrocarbons and precious stones in the Chukotka region.

Akademik Lomonosov is being towed to the Russian northern port city of Murmansk in May of this year

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Akademik Lomonosov is being towed to the Russian northern port city of Murmansk in May of this year

The huge power station was built under the ambitious expansion plans of President Vladimir Putin, which has shocked American observers.

Putin has expressed his intention to develop the region economically and to exploit the hidden Arctic resources of oil and gas, while Siberian reserves are declining.

Currently, only two million people live in the hostile region, but they generate 20% of the country's GDP.

Once in place, the Akademik Lomonosov will become the northernmost nuclear power plant in the world.

However, the installation has received criticism from environmentalists, who claim that it is a danger to the people who live there.

The Lomonosov platform was developed by Greenpeace & # 39; Chernobyl on Ice & # 39; or & # 39; floating Chernobyl & # 39; called.

The huge power station is intended to bring a more reliable energy source to a remote Arctic in Russia
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The huge power station is intended to bring a more reliable energy source to a remote Arctic in Russia

The huge power station is intended to bring a more reliable energy source to a remote Arctic in Russia

The station's owner, Rosatom, the state-owned company in charge of Russia's nuclear projects, has criticized.

& # 39; It is not at all justified to compare these two projects with each other. "These are unfounded claims, just as the reactors themselves work, it's different," said Vladimir Iriminku, chief engineer of Lomonosov.

& # 39; Of course, what happened in Chernobyl cannot happen again … And because it is stationed in Arctic waters, it will constantly cool and there is no lack of cold water. & # 39;

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The Chernobyl explosion immediately caused about 31 deaths, but millions of people were exposed to dangerous radiation levels.

The final death toll due to long-term radiation exposure is controversial. Although the UN predicted up to 9,000 related cancer deaths in 2005.

Greenpeace later estimated up to 200,000 fatalities, taking into account further health issues related to the disaster.

Employees in a machine room during installation and start-up work at the huge station

Employees in a machine room during installation and start-up work at the huge station

Employees in a machine room during installation and start-up work at the huge station

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