Ruined mother loses her leg after the diagnosis of rare cancer

A mother had to have her leg amputated after the diagnosis of a rare cancer, just a few months after the birth of twins.

Dionne Brown, 26, from South Molton, Devon, discovered that she had osteosarcoma four months after the arrival of Emmett and Cohen, a bone cancer.

The mother of the four had been back and forth to let the doctors complaining about leg pains last year.

She immediately started chemotherapy in September 2017 and underwent nine debilitating journeys over the course of almost a year.

But halfway through January 2018, the pain became too unbearable and she had her leg removed to give her relief.

Dionne Brown, 26, from South Molton, Devon, had to have her leg amputated after the diagnosis of a rare cancer, just months after the birth of twins

Dionne Brown, 26, from South Molton, Devon, had to have her leg amputated after the diagnosis of a rare cancer, just months after the birth of twins

Mrs. Brown started with leg pain in November 2016, but her diagnosis was made almost a year later. Pictured with her twins Emmett and Cohen since she had her leg amputated

Mrs. Brown started with leg pain in November 2016, but her diagnosis was made almost a year later. Pictured with her twins Emmett and Cohen since she had her leg amputated

Mrs. Brown started with leg pain in November 2016, but her diagnosis was made almost a year later. Pictured with her twins Emmett and Cohen since she had her leg amputated

Brown said: & # 39; My leg was swollen, I was vomiting, I limped and had so many painkillers.

& # 39; I screamed because I was in constant pain, it was so bad. & # 39;

Despite repeated visits to the doctors, Brown's condition was not diagnosed for nearly a year – and only four months after the birth of her twins.

WHAT IS OSTEOSARCOMA?

Osteosarcoma is the most common type of bone cancer, usually diagnosed in teenagers and young adults.

It occurs when the cells that form new bone form a cancerous tumor.

The cause of the cancer is unknown, but it is thought to be related to rapid bone growth, such as adolescence.

Most tumors usually develop around the knee, either in the lower part of the femur or in the upper part of the tibia.

If the cancer has not spread, the long-term survival rate is between 70 and 75 percent.

If osteosarcoma has already spread during diagnosis, for example to the lungs or other bones, the long-term survival rate is around 30 percent.

symptoms:

  • Bone pain (in motion, at rest or when lifting objects)
  • Bone fractures
  • Swelling
  • Redness
  • limp
  • Restriction of joint movement

There are some treatment options for osteosarcoma including chemotherapy that helps shrink and kill cancer cells.

In most cases, surgeons can save the cancerous limbs. The tumor and the surrounding bone are removed and the missing bone is replaced by an artificial specimen.

sources: Macmillan and Healthline

The pain started for the first time in November 2016 and in May Brown followed an X-ray.

She claims that she was told that she was suffering from osteoarthritis early.

She said: & # 39; They have completely missed the tumor that was there. And then it took another three months before I screamed and cried with the pain of looking again and found it was missed. & # 39;

By that time, she said the tumor was twice as large.

She said: & # 39; Making the diagnosis was devastating, I knew my life would never be the same again.

& # 39; But at the same time it was almost a relief, because for ten months they told me that nothing was wrong, but I knew that it was. & # 39;

Osteosarcoma is a rare form of bone cancer that usually affects children and young adults under 20 years of age.

It develops in growing bones, usually the arms or legs, especially around the knee joint.

In the UK, around 160 people are diagnosed with osteosarcoma every year, according to Bone Cancer Research Trust, which is less than three people out of every million people in the population.

Approximately 800 to 900 new cases of osteosarcoma are diagnosed in the US each year, about half of which are in children and teenagers.

Mrs. Brown had 11 months of intensive chemotherapy, just after her 25th birthday.

She said: & # 39; It was hard to be away from my four children, especially the twins who were so young.

& # 39; I spent almost a year in the hospital and was afraid that my children would not know who I was or recognize me if I lost my hair.

Mrs. Brown said it was hard to get away from her four children, especially her twin (photo) who was just four months old when she started chemotherapy and lost her hair

Mrs. Brown said it was hard to get away from her four children, especially her twin (photo) who was just four months old when she started chemotherapy and lost her hair

Mrs. Brown said it was hard to get away from her four children, especially her twin (photo) who was just four months old when she started chemotherapy and lost her hair

Mrs. Brown, pictured with her children Tiegan, Hallie, Emmett, and Cohen, said the year of chemotherapy treatment was terrible & # 39; terrible & # 39; but she made it on the other side

Mrs. Brown, pictured with her children Tiegan, Hallie, Emmett, and Cohen, said the year of chemotherapy treatment was terrible & # 39; terrible & # 39; but she made it on the other side

Mrs. Brown, pictured with her children Tiegan, Hallie, Emmett, and Cohen, said the year of chemotherapy treatment was terrible & # 39; terrible & # 39; but she made it on the other side

& # 39; It was pretty awful, but I'm on the other side now. & # 39;

For some patients, amputation may be the best option, for example if there is no way to store the limb because a large tumor extends into the nerves or blood vessels.

Mrs. Brown said she had been unable to lead a normal life ten months prior to surgery and that the amputation was a huge relief.

After she had finished chemotherapy eight months later, she was able to walk again.

Mrs. Brown said she would like to see more education about the different types of cancer.

She said: & # 39; GPs should be better informed about cancers. Too often I hear of cases where cancer is rejected because they think people are too young. & # 39;

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