Row of vaccines in Italy on the law that prohibits children from school if they have not received jabs

Italy's new government is trying to repeal a law that prohibits children without jabs from attending school

A dispute over vaccines has erupted in Italy as the country's new populist government struggles to nullify a law that prohibits children without jabs from attending school.

A law adopted by the Democratic Party government last year made it mandatory for pre-school children to be vaccinated against 10 diseases, such as measles, tetanus and polio.

Parents who have not vaccinated their children when they reach school age (six years in Italy) will be punished with a fine of up to 500 euros.

Italy's new government is trying to repeal a law that prohibits children without jabs from attending school

Italy's new government is trying to repeal a law that prohibits children without jabs from attending school

The law was introduced during an outbreak of measles in which the number of cases in Italy reached 5,004 in 2017, compared to 870 the previous year.

The new administration, formed by the Five Star Anti-establishment Movement and the Nationalist League, is leading the accusation of pushing back the law.

Last week, Italian lawmakers approved the mandatory vaccination amendment for preschoolers for the 2019-20 school year.

The World Health Organization (WHO) says that 93% to 95% of the population should be vaccinated to fight diseases such as measles.

The vaccination rate against measles in Italy has fallen far behind that goal, hovering around 85% for the first dose and 83% for the second dose from 2015.

The new Health Minister, Giulia Grillo, has drafted a new bill that presents what she calls a "flexible obligation", encouraging the use of mandatory vaccination only for short periods and when the WHO coverage rate is low .

Grillo, a doctor, says there will be guarantees that children who have not been vaccinated can enroll in classes that have secured the coverage recommended by the World Health Organization.

However, it also caused outrage when, in an interview with the main newspaper Corriere Della Sera on Wednesday, he said it was unrealistic to "make people believe that nobody will die" from measles.

  Last week, Italian lawmakers approved the amendment, which means that children who start school next year will not need to have the punches.

  Last week, Italian lawmakers approved the amendment, which means that children who start school next year will not need to have the punches.

Last week, Italian lawmakers approved the amendment, which means that children who start school next year will not need to have the punches.

Parents currently have to present preschool institutions with brochures listing vaccines, updated by the doctors who administer them.

For the 2019-20 school year, plans were implemented for educators to receive information on each child's vaccine directly from the local health authorities, a measure designed to circumvent the possibility of antivax parents falsifying documentation.

This measure was adopted in order to fight against a drop in the number of people who were vaccinated and who had received coverage below the limit of 95 percent recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO).

That proportion of coverage is the minimum required to create community immunity that prevents diseases and protects people with compromised immune systems that can not be vaccinated.

Coverage rates increased in Italy after the enactment of the previous government law, but many regions remain well below the WHO threshold for a range of diseases.

Data from the National Institute of Health of Italy published in July showed that four people, including a 10-month-old baby, had died of measles between January and May, the same number that died in 2017. In total, more than 1,700 people had contracted the disease, while last year there were 5,400 cases.

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