Roundup IS cancerous, the jury declares

Groundskeeper Dewayne Johnson claims that the herbicide caused its terminal cancer. In the picture: Johnson walking to the courtroom on July 9

Roundup causes cancer, a jury has declared in an unprecedented trial on the health hazards of Monsanto's herbicide.

After three days of deliberations, the jurors sided with Dewayne Johnson, 46, who is only a few weeks old, and awarded him $ 250 million in punitive damages, plus an indemnity that raises the total to $ 285 million.

The lawyers demanded $ 412 million for the married father of two children, whom doctors say has only a few weeks to live.

The gardener, who worked for years in Benicia, California, was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer that begins in white blood cells, in August 2014.

He mixed and sprayed hundreds of gallons of Roundup to keep the grass and weeds under control and believes that the pesticide, manufactured by Monsanto, is responsible for his terminal illness.

The responsible verdict means that the case could open the door to hundreds of additional lawsuits against the company recently acquired by Germany-based pharmaceutical and chemical group Bayer.

Groundskeeper Dewayne Johnson claims that the herbicide caused its terminal cancer. In the picture: Johnson walking to the courtroom on July 9

Groundskeeper Dewayne Johnson claims that the herbicide caused its terminal cancer. In the picture: Johnson walking to the courtroom on July 9

Johnson was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer that begins in white blood cells, in August 2014 and believes that Roundup is responsible. In the picture: Johnson's hand covered with injuries

Johnson was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer that begins in white blood cells, in August 2014 and believes that Roundup is responsible. In the picture: Johnson's hand covered with injuries

Johnson was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer that begins in white blood cells, in August 2014 and believes that Roundup is responsible. In the picture: Johnson's hand covered with injuries

The verdict, the first of its kind, was delayed because jurors spent hours analyzing the chronology of Johnson's symptoms, the validity of his expert witness's testimony and the discrepancies between Monsanto's medical findings and those of his critics.

The case is the first to come to trial alleging a cancer link to Roundup, one of the most widely used herbicides in the world.

Johnson used a generic version of Roundup called Ranger Pro repeatedly in his work after being promoted to a fielder in 2012 until mid-2015.

One of Johnson's attorneys, Timothy Litzenburg, told DailyMail.com that Johnson called the Monsanto hotline in November 2014 about his diagnosis.

"He said," Hey, I just want you to know that I have this and I want to ask if it could be contributing to my cancer, "Litzenburg said.

Johnson's concerns came to the desk of Dr. Daniel Goldstein, director of medical sciences at Monsanto, who told his colleagues he would call Johnson but never did, according to an internal email from the company.

Litzenburg told DailyMail.com that Johnson used hundreds of gallons of products between 30 and 40 times per year.

The testimony was heard that Johnson twice got soaked in the Ranger Pro.

Before reaching his verdict, the jury requested the testimony of Johnson's oncologist expert, Dr. Chadi Nabhan, the schedule of the first instance of Johnson where he was sprayed with Roundup and all his medical records, according to the journalist of The Courthouse News . Helen Christophi.

All were given medical records because they had not been admitted as evidence.

In the closing arguments, Monsanto's lawyer, George Lombardi, had criticized Dr. Nabhan for claiming that glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, causes mycosis fungoides, a type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Lombardi said Nabhan was the only doctor who found such a link and, if true, why he did not receive awards for the discovery.

The jury also wanted a chronology of the first time that Johnson accidentally got soaked with the pesticide.

While Johnson's attorney said the accident occurred in 2014, the Monsanto attorney argued that it was September 2013 and implied that Johnson's team lied about the dates to make it appear closer to his diagnosis.

Johnson said he contacted the company in 2014 after he received his diagnosis to ask about a possible link to cancer, but never received a response. In the picture: Johnson's back covered in injuries

Johnson said he contacted the company in 2014 after he received his diagnosis to ask about a possible link to cancer, but never received a response. In the picture: Johnson's back covered in injuries

Johnson said he contacted the company in 2014 after he received his diagnosis to ask about a possible link to cancer, but never received a response. In the picture: Johnson's back covered in injuries

Litzenburg said Johnson, who is among rounds of chemotherapy, "is actually borrowed, is not supposed to be alive today."

This is because in September 2015, doctors told Johnson that he would probably die in less than a couple of years, Litzenburg said.

The case, filed against Monsanto in 2016, was expedited for the trial due to Johnson's severe non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

The two-year-old father testified on the stand that he would never have sprayed & # 39; never & # 39; to the Ranger-Pro if he knew it would cause damage.

"I would never have sprayed that product on school grounds or around people if I knew it would hurt them," he said on the stand, according to the Courthouse News reporter. Helen Christophi.

& # 39; It's not ethical, it's wrong. I have children who go to school People who do not deserve that. They deserve something better.

Another Johnson lawyer, Brent Wisner, told the court that he is seeking more than $ 39 million in compensatory damages and $ 373 million in punitive damages.

The two-year-old father testified on the stand that he would never have sprayed & # 39; never & # 39; to the Ranger-Pro if he knew it would cause damage. In the photo: Johnson, on the right, with his wife Araceli Johnson

The two-year-old father testified on the stand that he would never have sprayed & # 39; never & # 39; to the Ranger-Pro if he knew it would cause damage. In the photo: Johnson, on the right, with his wife Araceli Johnson

The two-year-old father testified on the stand that he would never have sprayed & # 39; never & # 39; to the Ranger-Pro if he knew it would cause damage. In the photo: Johnson, on the right, with his wife Araceli Johnson

Johnson (pictured, with his children) said he sprayed hundreds of gallons of the product between 30 and 40 times a year and allegedly soaked in it repeatedly.

Johnson (pictured, with his children) said he sprayed hundreds of gallons of the product between 30 and 40 times a year and allegedly soaked in it repeatedly.

Johnson (pictured, with his children) said he sprayed hundreds of gallons of the product between 30 and 40 times a year and allegedly soaked in it repeatedly.

Wisner said Monsanto chose not to warn consumers of the risks and instead "have fought science" by minimizing the suspected link between the chemical herbicide and cancer.

"Monsanto made the decision not to put a cancer warning on the label, that's a choice that reflects irresponsible disregard for human health," Wisner told jurors on Tuesday in the final arguments.

& # 39; Today is [Monsanto’s] day of the reckoning, "Wisner told jurors on Tuesday in their final arguments.

THE SAGA REGARDING THE SAFETY OF GLYPHOSATE

Glyphosate is a herbicide registered for the first time in the United States in 1974.

It is marketed as a salt or an amber liquid without odor.

Monsanto markets glyphosate as part of the Roundup pesticide.

Several studies found that high doses administered to laboratory animals caused cancer, although the evidence is "limited" when it comes to humans.

In March 2015, the World Health Organization classified glyphosate as a carcinogen of Group 2a, a substance that probably causes cancer in people.

In 2017, California added glyphosate to its proposal list 65, which requires Roundup to carry a warning label if it is sold in California.

Monsanto has vehemently denied that its product causes cancer and says there are more than 800 studies that have established its safety.

However, more than 4,000 plaintiffs have filed lawsuits, 800 over the past year, alleging that Monsanto made them or their families sick.

"Each and every one of the cancer risks that were found had this moment, where science finally caught up, where they could no longer bury it."

Monsanto has denied any relationship with the disease, saying that the product has been subjected to rigorous testing and more than 800 studies have established its safety.

"The message of the evidence is clear, and that is that this cancer was not caused by Ranger Pro," said George Lombardi during the final arguments.

& # 39; The facts are what should guide you in this case & # 39;

The company's lawyers also said that non-Hodgkin's lymphoma takes two and a half years to develop and that Johnson developed the symptoms of his cancer about a year and a half after he started using the product.

Therefore, they argued that their cancer had already taken hold.

"The story simply does not make sense," Lombardi told jurors.

But Wisner argued that Monsanto Ghost wrote an investigation citing the safety of the herb killer and then quoted him.

Wisner said that the main ingredient, glyphosate, a chemical compound declared carcinogenic by the World Health Organization, combined with other chemicals in Roundup, resulted in a "synergy". causing cancer.

A key to Johnson's case will be whether the jurors are convinced that the Monsanto pesticide caused or aggravated his illness.

"We do not have to show that Roundup was the only cause, we just have to show that it is a collaborator," Wisner said.

Johnson's attorney says they are seeking $ 39 million in compensatory damages and $ 373 million in punitive damages.

Johnson's attorney says they are seeking $ 39 million in compensatory damages and $ 373 million in punitive damages.

Johnson's attorney says they are seeking $ 39 million in compensatory damages and $ 373 million in punitive damages.

Monsanto has denied any relationship with the disease, saying that the product has been subjected to rigorous testing and more than 800 studies have established its safety.

Monsanto has denied any relationship with the disease, saying that the product has been subjected to rigorous testing and more than 800 studies have established its safety.

Monsanto has denied any relationship with the disease, saying that the product has been subjected to rigorous testing and more than 800 studies have established its safety.

"Your verdict will be heard around the world," Wisner told jurors.

"Monsanto will finally have to do something: carry out the studies he never did and warn people he never noticed."

The Monsanto Roundup flagship herbicide was launched in 1976.

Roundup has been approved by the Environmental Protection Agency of the United States, according to Lombardi.

Two years after the WHO called it "probably carcinogenic," the state of California named glyphosate as a cancer-causing ingredient under state Proposition 65, which requires Roundup to carry a warning label if it is sold in California.

Also, earlier this year, a peer-reviewed study revealed that women in agricultural-intensive areas of Indiana tended to have shorter pregnancies if they had been regularly exposed to glyphosate.

Founded in 1901 in St Louis, Missouri, Monsanto began producing agrochemicals in the 1940s. It was acquired by Bayer for more than $ 62 billion in June.

Bayer announced at that time that it would withdraw the name of Monsanto and replace it with Bayer as the company's name.

& # 39; Bayer will remain the name of the company. Monsanto will no longer be a company name. The products purchased will retain their brands and become part of Bayer's portfolio, "Bayer said in a statement to Reuters.

Bayer's decision to abandon the name means that Monsanto products such as Roundup will continue to be Roundup, but now they will be Bayer's Roundup, not Monsanto's Roundup. Roundup will still contain glyphosate.

& # 39; Bayer will remain the name of the company. Monsanto will no longer be a company name. The products purchased will retain their brands and become part of Bayer's portfolio, "Bayer told Reuters in a statement.

In other words, products like Roundup would retain their name, but they would be announced as Bayer's Roundup, not Monsanto.

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