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Rodney Reed prisoner in death row lives & # 39; one day at a time & # 39; while celebrities postpone their execution

Rodney Reed prisoner in death row says he & # 39; one day at a time & # 39; lives two weeks away with his execution and many celebrities are lobbying to get his death sentence for the murder of 19-year-old Stacey Stites.

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Kim Kardashian, Rihanna, TI, Busta Rhymes, Meek Mill, Questlove and other well-known personalities have argued through social media for Reed & # 39; s life in the light of evidence that they could protect him from the murder of Stites in Texas in 1996.

Reed, 51, says the real killer is the former fiancé of police officer Jimmy Lewis Fennell Jr. was suspected of crime by others.

Prisoner in death row Rodney Reed says in an interview with the prison (photo) that he & # 39; one day at a time & # 39; lives two weeks away with his execution and a large number of celebrities lobby to get his death penalty for the murder of 19-year-old Stacey Stites

Rodney Reed claims that he was wrongly convicted for the murder of 19-year-old Stacey Stites (photo). Reed maintains that the real killer was the former police officer Jimmy Lewis Fennell Jr. of Stites, who was suspected by others of the crime

Rodney Reed claims that he was wrongly convicted for the murder of 19-year-old Stacey Stites (photo). Reed maintains that the real killer was the former police officer Jimmy Lewis Fennell Jr. of Stites, who was suspected by others of the crime

Rodney Reed claims that he was wrongly convicted for the murder of 19-year-old Stacey Stites (photo). Reed maintains that the real killer was the former police officer Jimmy Lewis Fennell Jr. of Stites, who was suspected by others of the crime

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& # 39; The evidence points directly in that direction & # 39 ;, Reed says NBC News Thursday in a prison interview.

Reed, who is black, claims that he was wrongly convicted for the murder of Stites, who was white, and insists that Fennell, who has imposed a 10-year prison sentence for raping a woman during the service, is responsible .

& # 39; I am innocent of this case, absolutely innocent & # 39 ;, he said in the prison interview with NBC and said that he & # 39; one day at a time & # 39; and & # 39; as well as expected & # 39; lives while the time runs out for his upcoming execution.

"I think of family, think of my freedom, think of my life," he said in a telephone receiver at the Allan B. Polunsky unit, a prison in West Livingston, Texas.

His case is only attracting the last national attention as a possible unlawful conviction. Celebrities have lent their voices to those who wait in prison to die, hoping to suspend their executions so that authorities can re-examine their cases.

Kardashian is one of the most vocal in wanting to help Reed, speaks to him from prison and uses her resources as a celebrity to get him legal help to postpone his performance on November 20.

The reality TV showster has already helped more than a dozen people to win their freedom from prison. Kardashian, who now wants to become a lawyer, drew a lot of attention last year to visiting President Donald Trump in the White House and successfully pleaded for a grace for Alice Marie Johnson.

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Johnson, a great-grandmother, had been in prison for more than 20 years for a non-violent drug offense before being released in June 2018.

Kim Kardashian (left), who now wants to become a lawyer, drew a lot of attention last year to visiting President Donald Trump at the White House and successfully pleaded for favoring Alice Marie Johnson (right).

Kim Kardashian (left), who now wants to become a lawyer, drew a lot of attention last year to visiting President Donald Trump at the White House and successfully pleaded for favoring Alice Marie Johnson (right).

Kim Kardashian (left), who now wants to become a lawyer, drew a lot of attention last year to visiting President Donald Trump at the White House and successfully pleaded for favoring Alice Marie Johnson (right).

A tweet by rap artist and actor TI, who noted when he signed an online petition calling on Texas Governor Gregg Abbott to stay on the upcoming execution of prisoner Rodney Reed on November 20

A tweet by rap artist and actor TI, who noted when he signed an online petition calling on Texas Governor Gregg Abbott to stay on the upcoming execution of prisoner Rodney Reed on November 20

A tweet by rap artist and actor TI, who noted when he signed an online petition calling on Texas Governor Gregg Abbott to stay on the upcoming execution of prisoner Rodney Reed on November 20

Rihanna was one of the celebrities who, via social media (photo), urged people to sign an online petition asking Texas Governor Gregg Abbott to stay the upcoming execution of prisoner Rodney Reed on November 20
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Rihanna was one of the celebrities who, via social media (photo), urged people to sign an online petition asking Texas Governor Gregg Abbott to stay the upcoming execution of prisoner Rodney Reed on November 20

Rihanna was one of the celebrities who, via social media (photo), urged people to sign an online petition asking Texas Governor Gregg Abbott to stay the upcoming execution of prisoner Rodney Reed on November 20

Supporters who have embraced Reed's claims have distributed an online petition signed by more than 1 million people who want Texas Governor Greg Abbot to continue the execution of the prisoner in death row.

Prosecutors had pointed to DNA evidence to secure the 1998 Reed murder.

Reed, however, who had been accused but not convicted in several other cases of sexual abuse, argued that his DNA was found on Stites for having had a consensual relationship.

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Reed acknowledges that when he was first confronted with the police about Stites, he denied knowing her. & # 39; That was the worst mistake I could ever have made, and I didn't want to be accused of her death & # 39 ;, he told NBC.

By claiming that Fennel was the real murderer, Reed and his supporters noted that the former agent was involved with a fellow prisoner, Arthur J. Snow Jr.

Snow, a member of the Aryan Brotherhood, claims in a sworn statement that the former agent made a confession in prison and admitted that he had killed Stites for cheating him.

& # 39; He was talking about his ex, and with a lot of hatred and resentment, & # 39 ;, says Snow in the statement DailyMail.com obtained.

& # 39; Jimmy said his fiance had slept with a black man behind his back & # 39 ;, Snow continues.

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& # 39; By the way, Jimmy talked about this experience, I could see it made him very angry. Towards the end of the conversation, jimmy said confidentially, & # 39; had to kill my n-loving fiance & # 39 ;, Snow says.

He adds that he believed Fennell made the referral in an attempt to join the brotherhood, a white supremacist prison gang and crime syndicate.

Fennell's lawyer, Robert Phillips, denied that his client played a role in Stites' death and was critical of Reed's defense team for & # 39; the group of witnesses who continue to come out of the woodwork 20 years after the fact & # 39 , reports The statesman.

& # 39; It's just ridiculous to buy Rodney Reed circus in this & # 39 ;, Phillips told NBC.

Stites & sister Debrao Oliver is also at Fennell.

& # 39; Never thought Jimmy was guilty of killing my sister & # 39 ;, Oliver said, NBC reports.

Crystal Hefley, another sister, said the family is praying & # 39; for the end of a nightmare that we have to live over and over again & # 39 ;, NBC reports.

Attorney Bryce Benjet of the Innocence Project, who works to reverse wrongful beliefs, says it has taken & # 39; years and extraordinary efforts & # 39; to break a prejudice that has prevented Reed from pursuing its exemption.

In addition to Snow's sworn statement, three expert witnesses whose testimony helped to secure Reed & # 39; s belief in errors in their original statements, according to documents obtained by the Innocence Project.

The level of evidence that can be re-examined has given Reed hope, he says.

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& # 39; I am cautiously optimistic that something good should happen & # 39 ;, he told NBC. & # 39; I mean, I am a believer. Do you know? I am a believer & # 39 ;.

Prisoner in Death Row, Rodney Reed, is pictured waving to his family in the Bastrop district court on Friday, October 13, 2017. He says he is now & # 39; cautiously optimistic & # 39; about his chances of delaying his execution and possibly being exempted

Prisoner in Death Row, Rodney Reed, is pictured waving to his family in the Bastrop district court on Friday, October 13, 2017. He says he is now & # 39; cautiously optimistic & # 39; about his chances of delaying his execution and possibly being exempted

Prisoner in Death Row, Rodney Reed, is pictured waving to his family in the Bastrop district court on Friday, October 13, 2017. He says he is now & # 39; cautiously optimistic & # 39; about his chances of delaying his execution and possibly being exempted

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