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Roderick Deakin-White, 38, caused & # 39; gruesome injuries & # 39; when he repeatedly hit Amy Parsons 35-year-old with a two-foot metal bar in April 25, jury members heard. He fled from the scene at Tower Hamlets, but told the police that he was a & # 39; killer & # 39; was after he handed himself over the next day

A former Royal Opera House designer would have killed his fiancé after she told him she didn't like his crossdressing fetish and admitted that she had cheated on him, a court heard today.

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Roderick Deakin-White, 38, caused & # 39; gruesome injuries & # 39; when he repeatedly hit Amy Parsons 35-year-old with a two-foot metal bar on April 25, jurors heard in an extraordinary day of allegations on Wednesday.

The graphic designer reportedly fled the scene in Tower Hamlets, East London, but told the police that he was a & # 39; killer & # 39; was after he handed himself over the next day.

Jury members at Snaresbrook Crown Court heard that Deakin-White had blamed herself after Mrs. Parsons admitted that she had cheated on him with another man, and they had collided with his crossed fetish that she knew was uncomfortable.

Roderick Deakin-White, 38, caused & # 39; gruesome injuries & # 39; when he repeatedly hit Amy Parsons 35-year-old with a two-foot metal bar in April 25, jury members heard. He fled from the scene at Tower Hamlets, but told the police that he was a & # 39; killer & # 39; was after he handed himself over the next day

Roderick Deakin-White, 38, caused & # 39; gruesome injuries & # 39; when he repeatedly hit Amy Parsons 35-year-old with a two-foot metal bar in April 25, jury members heard. He fled from the scene at Tower Hamlets, but told the police that he was a & # 39; killer & # 39; was after he handed himself over the next day

Attorney Gareth Patterson QC said to Snaresbrook Crown Court: & # 39; On Thursday, April 25 this year, he attacked his partner and fiance, a woman named Amy Parsons.

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& # 39; Because he didn't want to accept that she would leave him, he hit a heavy metal rod to repeatedly hit her while she was showering in the Docklands flat they shared.

& # 39; With his strokes with that beam, he caused her terrible injuries and fractures to the head and to her face and to her brain.

& # 39; He left her in her own blood in the bathtub of her apartment and left the apartment to do nothing to help or treat her. & # 39;

Miss Parsons stayed in the bathtub of her flat and judges told it took more than 30 minutes to die

Jury members heard that Miss Parsons had received a WhatsApp message from her new lover, James Saunders, 58 minutes before CCTV captured Deakin-White and left the flat after the attack.

Miss Parsons had been brutally showered and it took the jury more than 30 minutes to die after he left her.

After the attack, the jury heard Deakin-White wading into the Thames to kill himself, but turned and returned to the riverbank.

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Patterson said: & # 39; She probably survived something in the one-hour region for a short time, most likely more than 30 minutes. & # 39;

The following day, the suspect would have told police during his detention that he was going to the Thames near Prospect of Whitby pub.

Jury members heard that the couple had been in a relationship for several years, but he was & # 39; dependent & # 39; from his girlfriend, who was born in Australia but lived in the UK for many years

Jury members heard that the couple had been in a relationship for several years, but he was & # 39; dependent & # 39; from his girlfriend, who was born in Australia but lived in the UK for many years

Jury members heard that the couple had been in a relationship for several years, but he was & # 39; dependent & # 39; from his girlfriend, who was born in Australia but lived in the UK for many years

& # 39; He said he was considering committing suicide, but when he entered the water, he decided not to do so and returned to the river bank. & # 39;

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The prosecutor said that Deakin-White had drunk four beers and champagne with Miss Parsons on the night of the murder, but replied & # 39; no comment & # 39; when asked if he was drunk by the police at the time.

Jury members heard that Miss Parsons and Deakin-White had been in a relationship for several years, but he was & # 39; dependent & # 39; from his girlfriend, who was born in Australia but lived in the UK for many years.

The prosecutor said: & # 39; Before the defendant met her, he had had few relationships with other women and the evidence you will hear suggests that after he met her and the relationship started he became extremely dependent on her.

& # 39; The flat in which they lived was hers. He didn't go to work. She offered him financial support and worked as a personal assistant to a manager at an insurance company in the city.

& # 39; Amy paid the rent for the flat every month. The evidence suggests that he was dependent on her.

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& # 39; Sometimes he had depression in the past, but he had chosen not to use medication and her dependence seems to have been both emotional and financial.

& # 39; You will hear evidence of the nature of that relationship from witnesses who knew them both and from witnesses with whom they exchanged messages.

& # 39; They had both discussed the relationship with those different witnesses. Amy became unhappy. & # 39;

He continued: & # 39; One point of contention was that he wanted to do crossdressing. She wasn't happy about this and this was something he often wanted to do when they were together and intimate. She didn't like it.

It was heard that he was a point of contention when he was engaged in cross dressing. Prosecutors said: & she was allegedly unhappy about this and this was something he often wanted to do when they were together and they were intimate. She didn't like it & # 39;

It was heard that he was a point of contention when he was engaged in cross dressing. Prosecutors said: & she was allegedly unhappy about this and this was something he often wanted to do when they were together and they were intimate. She didn't like it & # 39;

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It was heard that he was a point of contention when he was engaged in cross dressing. Prosecutors said: & she was allegedly unhappy about this and this was something he often wanted to do when they were together and they were intimate. She didn't like it & # 39;

& # 39; A few weeks before her death, Amy Parsons began to become more and more crazy about a colleague at work, a man named James Saunders.

& # 39; Their feelings and affections for each other developed into a sexual relationship.

& # 39; Amy Parsons told the defendant about this. He told a friend that he blamed himself somewhat because he had pushed her towards him. But he became unhappy and told people he felt hurt.

& # 39; The evidence suggests that he felt he was losing Amy. & # 39;

The jury heard that the couple had rowed after Mrs. Parsons told her fiancé about the affair with Mr. Saunders, a colleague of hers.

Saunders told the court that he had deduced & # 39; that she would break up with him.

The couple slept at his house the night before and he asked her: "I'm glad I can do something to help you through this," the court heard.

Miss Parsons was declared dead on the spot and a post-mortem investigation showed that she had been beaten several times

Miss Parsons was declared dead on the spot and a post-mortem investigation showed that she had been beaten several times

Miss Parsons was declared dead on the spot and a post-mortem investigation showed that she had been beaten several times

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Jury members were told that Miss Parsons sent a message to Mr. Saunders just before 8 p.m. with the text: & # 39; home for the final round. Oh yes, god yes.

& # 39; He went to the store, he is trying to make all these changes and big gestures, and I have something like & # 39; no, i don't want it. & # 39; "

Saunders reportedly replied: & # 39; If you have to leave, you are welcome to stay here & # 39; and she replied: & # 39; I am all over. & # 39;

Persecution, Mr. Patterson QC, told the court in light of the evidence: “You will hear from people with whom he spoke and exchanged messages. There were lines between the suspect and Amy.

& # 39; As time went on, his misfortune deepened and developed into jealousy of the other man and anger.

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& # 39; He described the new man in her life as a & # 39; bast *** & # 39 ;, a & # 39; creepy & # 39 ;, a & # 39; motherfucker & # 39 ;, a & # 39; bloody k *** headline & # 39 ;, a & # 39; complete tool & # 39; and a & # 39; f ** king twat & # 39 ;.

& # 39; He sent him a message with the words & # 39; retreat & # 39 ;. He started stalking Amy, following her home from work, and going to a restaurant to try and meet her with this new man, James Saunders.

& # 39; He tried to control what she was doing, access to her laptop, and studied the use of Uber cabs for her.

& # 39; He described her as a & # 39; sneaky b *** h & # 39; and as a & # 39; nasty, nasty person & # 39 ;. He wrote to a friend: & # 39; Why are women so terrible? & # 39; and called her & # 39; a f liar & # 39; and wrote & # 39; I hate her & # 39 ;.

& # 39; He told another friend: & # 39; I'm going to do something stupid, I just know that I am. & # 39;

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Summarizing his argument, Mr. Patterson QC said: “He accepts that he caused Amy Parson's death, but his case is that he is not guilty of murder, but the least violation of manslaughter.

& # 39; However, he will say that he was provoked. We expect him to tell you that he has lost self-control, that any reasonable and sober man in his circumstances may have lost self-control and acted in the same way.

& # 39; We say (this) is completely unrealistic. & # 39;

The process continues.

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