Advertisements
<pre><pre>Robotic contact lens that lets you zoom in by blinking

Robotic contact lenses that allow you to zoom in by blinking can one day turn your eyeball into a camera

  • A new soft lens made from salt water can be controlled by your eye movements
  • The scientists measured the electro-electronic images that are generated when eyes
  • These signals generate when eyes make specific movements, such as up or down
  • This creates a soft biomimetic lens that responds to those electrical impulses
  • The lens was able to change the focal length depending on the signals generated and could therefore zoom in in an instant
Advertisements

Scientists have created a new robot contact lens that is controlled by small eye movements, including double blinks to zoom in and out.

The contact lens, which is made from salt water only, mimics the natural electrical signals in the human eyeball.

There is a constant electrical potential between the front and back of the eyeball, even when your eyes are closed or in total darkness.

When you move your eyes to look around or blink, the movement of the electrical potential can be measured.

Advertisements

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego, developed the lens with the help of these signals, called electro-oculograms, to control a soft lens.

Scientists hope that this could help in creating new innovations ranging from prosthetic eyes to eye-controlled cameras.

Scroll down for video

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego, have developed a robot lens that is controlled by small eye movements. The contact lens works by simulating the natural electrical signals in the human eyeball

With & # 39; electro-oculographic signals & # 39; you can move your eyeball even when your eyes are closed.

Speak against New scientist, Dr. Shenggiang Cai, who led the study, said: "Even if your eye can't see, many people can still move their eyeballs and generate this electro-oculographic signal."

Advertisements

The contact lens is made of polymers that expand when an electric current is applied.

This current is supplied by five electrodes around the eye, which act like muscles.

When the polymer becomes convex, the lens zooms in, which means that future users can zoom in on an object by blinking at them.

The team measured the electro-graphic signals that are generated when eyes make specific movements – up; down; left; right; blink; double flashing – and created a soft biomimetic lens that responds directly to those electrical impulses.

The lens created could change its focal length depending on the signals generated.

Advertisements

There is a constant electrical potential between the front and back of the eyeball, even when your eyes are closed or in total darkness. When you move your eyes to look around or blink, the movement of the electrical potential can be measured

& # 39; The system developed in the current research can be used in the future in visual prostheses, adjustable goggles and remotely controlled robotics & # 39 ;, says Dr. Cai.

It remains unclear when the contact lenses are ready to buy, or how much they are likely to cost.

& # 39; The system developed in the current research can be used in the future in visual prostheses, adjustable glasses and remotely controlled robotics. & # 39;

Advertisements

Ultimately, the interface that the researchers designed to control their lens could be used to control other types of machines or maybe even entire robots.

The study was published in Advanced functional materials.

HOW DOES THE PUPIL WORK?

The pupil is the opening in the middle of the iris (the structure that gives our eyes their color).

The function of the pupil is to allow light to enter the eye, where it is then focused on the retina.

The pupil's black color is because the light passes through it and is subsequently absorbed by the retina – meaning that no light is reflected.

Advertisements

The size of the pupil and how much light it enters is controlled by muscles in the iris.

A muscle narrows the pupil opening and another iris muscle dilates the pupil.

In low light conditions, the pupil widens so that more light can reach the retina to improve night vision.

In clear conditions, the pupil narrows to limit how much light enters the eye.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) sciencetech