Road rules: Surprising things that are ILLEGAL – and the law on the flash camera you probably did not know

From squealing on your horn to say hello to playing loud music and having a dirty car – there is a long list of traffic rules that you probably did not know you broke.

And while all drivers know they will be fined if they are caught driving above the speed limit, traveling underneath can also burn a hole in your pocket.

With the help of Teletrac Navman, Australia's leading fleet management company, Daily Mail Australia can reveal some of the more surprising things that are illegal on the road.

EAT, DRINK, DO YOUR MAKE-UP OR CHANGE MUSIC

If you eat, drink or make makeup while driving, you can be hit with a fine of up to $ 600 plus three points, depending on your local state law (stock image)

If you eat, drink or make makeup while driving, you can be hit with a fine of up to $ 600 plus three points, depending on your local state law (stock image)

If your hands are busy unpacking lunch or if you make sure your eyeliner is perfect, then your concentration is not on the road.

Maybe you only look away for a few seconds, but in that time everything can happen.

Keep your eyes on the road or you will be fined up to $ 600 plus three points, depending on your local state law.

SLEEP IN YOUR CAR AFTER A LOT OF DRINKS

There is no federal law against sleeping in your car, but it may mean that you have to prove that you do not intend to drive with it if you have drunk.

In some countries there is napping in the driver's seat while the legal limit has been exceeded to continue driving under the influence, even if the keys are not in the ignition lock.

Play safely and take a taxi home or risk a fine of up to $ 1,400 and a suspension of ten months.

RELAXING LOUD MUSIC

If you ignore an oral warning or instructions to lower your music, you can get a fine (stock)

If you ignore an oral warning or instructions to lower your music, you can get a fine (stock)

If you ignore an oral warning or instructions to lower your music, you can get a fine (stock)

Playing loud music from your car with the windows down can bring you to the wrong side of the law.

While you might enjoy karaoke in your car, a policeman might not take the noise nuisance so kindly.

If you ignore an oral warning or instructions to refuse the party, you can get a fine of up to $ 200 in New South Wales, or $ 175 in Queensland.

PAIN FOR THE IMPROPER REASONS

Car sensors are designed to alert other road users and animals to your presence.

We have almost all done, but if you use it for another reason, including a hello or goodbye, this can lead to hefty fines.

In New South Wales drivers can be fined $ 298, or $ 282 in Victoria.

DRIVING BY PUDDELS TO SPLASH PEDESTRIANS

Intentionally splashing pedestrians passing through a puddle is prohibited in New South Wales (stock)

Intentionally splashing pedestrians passing through a puddle is prohibited in New South Wales (stock)

Intentionally splashing pedestrians passing through a puddle is prohibited in New South Wales (stock)

Where you can, it is recommended that you avoid large puddles that can splash mud on pedestrians – especially those waiting for the bus.

It is not fun to be splashed on your way to work and a fine of $ 177 and three points are not a joke either.

The crime is only punishable in New South Wales.

CHANGE YOUR LIGHT TO WARN OTHER DIRECTORS OF POLICE RADARS

While this may seem a convenient way to protect your co-drivers, this could result in a fine of up to $ 110 and the loss of one point in New South Wales.

The reason is that the flashing of your lights can be misinterpreted as an attempt to dazzle another road user.

It is not strictly forbidden to warn others, but the dimming of your lights is limited.

The offense also comes with a fine of $ 100 in Western Australia and $ 50 in Queensland.

THE MIDDLE LONG HANG

Hogging on the middle lane when left free can carry fines of up to $ 108 (stock)

Hogging on the middle lane when left free can carry fines of up to $ 108 (stock)

Hogging on the middle lane when left free can carry fines of up to $ 108 (stock)

The basic rule of highway driving is to stay left unless you catch up.

If you are traveling at a safe speed, you can change lanes at any time.

But when you are left in the middle row, you can impose fines of up to $ 108 and two points in New South Wales and $ 66 and two points in Queensland.

BELIEVE THE MYTH OF THE SPEED OF 10 PERCENT SPEED

Some drivers are of the opinion that driving with 10 percent above the speed limit is allowed, but this is not the case.

Crossing speed limits by even a few kilometers will result in fines of up to $ 201 and one point of rejection.

The laws depend on the discretion of the police, but speed cameras will not be so forgiving.

In New South Wales a speed limit of less than 10 percent is exceeded with a fine of $ 119 and one point.

In Victoria drivers can be defeated with a $ 201 and one point, South Australia $ 174, Western Australia $ 100 and Queensland $ 174.

DO NOT CONFIRM YOUR PHONE ON A STATION WHEN USING YOUR GPS

If you get caught on dealing with your mobile, even for GPS use, you can score a fine and a penalty of five points (stock)

If you get caught on dealing with your mobile, even for GPS use, you can score a fine and a penalty of five points (stock)

If you get caught on dealing with your mobile, even for GPS use, you can score a fine and a penalty of five points (stock)

Many drivers use mobile apps such as Google Maps to get them where they are going.

If you get caught on dealing with your mobile, even for GPS use, you can score a fine and a penalty of five points.

To avoid this, ensure that your phone is secured to your vehicle with a holder that does not obscure your view of the road.

In New South Wales it is a heavy fine and the loss of five points, while in Western Australia drivers can be hit with a fine of $ 400.

ROUNDING SLOWLY

Although many drivers are aware of the dangers of driving too fast, some do not see the danger driving too slowly.

According to Australian traffic regulations, it is illegal to block the path of another vehicle.

This can drive unreasonably slow and carries a fine of up to $ 253 and four points lower in New South Wales.

LET YOUR PASSENGER HOLD A BABY WHILE YOU RIDE

The use of a baby seat is a requirement for children under the age of four - and they can not be removed while the car is moving, even for breastfeeding (stock)

The use of a baby seat is a requirement for children under the age of four - and they can not be removed while the car is moving, even for breastfeeding (stock)

The use of a baby seat is a requirement for children under the age of four – and they can not be removed while the car is moving, even for breastfeeding (stock)

Even if your passenger insists, the driver is always responsible for ensuring that everyone in the vehicle is safely secured for the journey.

The use of a baby seat is a requirement for children under the age of four – and they can not be taken out when the car is moving, even for breastfeeding.

The offense comes with a fine of $ 500 and the loss of three points dead throughout Australia.

HAS DISABLED YOUR HEADLIGHTS DURING DRIVING IN THE DARK

It can be difficult to see in the dark, especially on rural country roads and motorways with little lighting.

Driving at night or in the dark without lighting can risk a fine of up to $ 112 and one point in New South Wales.

In Victoria, drivers can be hit with a $ 211 fine and lose one penalty point – and in Queensland one point and $ 130 fine.

TO HAVE A DIRTY CAR

If your car is so dirty, your license plates are unclear or unreadable. You can receive a fine of $ 415 and lose three points (stock).

If your car is so dirty, your license plates are unclear or unreadable. You can receive a fine of $ 415 and lose three points (stock).

If your car is so dirty, your license plates are unclear or unreadable. You can receive a fine of $ 415 and lose three points (stock).

Mud and dirt are inevitable during your daily journey.

But if this builds up to the point where your license plates are unclear or unreadable, you can pay a penalty of $ 415 and lose three points.

Your records must be legible at all times.

PARKING ON A FOOTPATH

On narrow streets it can be tempting to be polite & # 39; polite & # 39; to park and stop your car on a curb, but mounting the gutter can cause severe punishment in some states.

Parking on the footpath or the roadside will impose a fine of up to $ 126 in Queensland.

In NSW drivers can get a fine of $ 99 and in Victoria $ 85.

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