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Cities in the South have seen a particularly strong increase in the number of & # 39; extreme heat days & # 39; that strikes every year (dark red)

The US – and much of the world – has been hit by a series of historic heat waves this summer, and it is even endangering healthy people, especially when exercising outside, a new Climate Central report warns.

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July was the hottest month ever registered in the US and it sent more than 100 UPS deliverers to hospitals for convulsions, fainting and even kidney failure due to the extreme heat, NBC reported.

And in much of the south and southwest of the US, the heat indices broke 90 degrees, triggering warnings from the National Weather Service and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Heat is the main cause of weather-related deaths, although these fatalities usually occur in sick, older or young children.

But on those days with extreme heat – which have become much more common in the last 40 years, heat becomes a major cause of death for high school children – and a danger to healthy adults who stay in it for too long.

Cities in the South have seen a particularly strong increase in the number of & # 39; extreme heat days & # 39; that strikes every year (dark red)

Cities in the South have seen a particularly strong increase in the number of & # 39; extreme heat days & # 39; that strikes every year (dark red)

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HEAT WAVES ARE SICKENING DELIVERY WORKERS, LEAVING UPS WITH LITTLE DRIVERS THAT WORK FOR MANY HOURS

& # 39; I couldn't even walk to the houses, & # 39; Stephen Nowlin told NBC.

Nowlin, 36, is a UPS driver in Fort Worth, Texas.

After recovering from a broken foot, his first day at work was again at the end of June.

He thought he would have an easy route on his first day back, but UPS had few hands and Nowlin had to pick up the slack.

Suddenly his & # 39; easy day & # 39; 177 stops in eight hours with 94 degrees of heat.

Hardly able to get up, Fortunately Nowlin had a supervisor with him. The supervisor had to take over packages into front porches and doors.

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When they returned to the UPS distribution center, Nowlin vomited violently and was told they had to work a little in the office air-conditioning.

All that was needed was a short walk to the car to fully activate the heat again.

Nowlin got the car, but immediately fainted.

After a few days trying to stay home sick, being called up and feeling sick again

Finally, Nowlin went to a doctor who diagnosed him with head injury and heat exhaustion.

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Heat diseases can range from sunburn to heat stroke, a life-threatening condition that can cause fatal brain swelling or permanent damage.

The heat exhaustion that hit Nowlin is only one step lower than heat stroke.

People run the risk of getting these higher-quality heat problems when exposed to high temperatures for a long period of time without a break – as happened with Nowlin and at least 99 other UPS employees.

The danger also increases when they are particularly physically active – and that is the warning that Climate Central has attached to its recent report.

REPORT reveals the emergence of & # 39; DANGEROES & # 39; OF HIGH TEMPERATURES AND HUMIDITY IN THE USA

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The report from the organization, released Wednesday, analyzed the temperatures at 239 locations in the US.

In the vast majority of them – 198 – the number of days that the temperature has risen above 90 degrees over the last four decades.

"These extreme heat days now cover much of the summer for many cities in the south and southwest, while parts of the country that in the past had relatively few summer days the 90 ° F heat index now experienced weeks of them," the authors of the report.

And more parts of the US are seeing more & # 39; danger days & # 39 ;, when heat and humidity combine forces to create the & # 39; real & # 39; raise the temperature to 105 degrees.

Almost a dozen American cities have seen an increase of four or more average annual danger days since 1979.

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EXTREME HEAT MAY BE DANGEROUS FOR THE MOST ATHLETIC PEOPLE

Danger days can have disastrous consequences, especially for school sports.

High school athletes may feel in shape and equipped to push themselves despite the extreme heat, but even for children in the best shape, physical activities on a hot day can be fatal.

According to the new report, 64 football players have died from a heat stroke since 1995. Most of them were in high school, although 13 were high school players, two professionals and two more in organized children's teams.

& # 39; As climate change threatens to increase throughout the day with high heat index, athletic trainers, coaches and medical professionals need to be trained and prepared to respond to EHI in athletes of all ages, prevent, recognize and treat & # 39 ;, the report said. authors wrote.

That means making sure players get enough breaks, stay hydrated and, as some experts advise, carefully monitor temperatures and humidity.

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