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The diehard members of the Richmond Tigers cheerleader team start the festivities while the last siren sounds at the VFL Grand Final of 1974, making them a 41-point win over North Melbourne

The colors have not changed, but faces in the crowd and in the field have certainly changed.

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It was 1974 and the Richmond Tigers were about to win back-to-back premierships, a feat they had not achieved since 1920 and 1921 when there were only nine teams in the league.

In the front row behind the goals at the end of Punt Road, crazy fans in yellow and black were euphoric, a long day of support from their team ended as they had dreamed.

A moving photo of the supporters of the working class from that grand finale is far removed from the 100,000 multicultural fans who pack the MCG on Saturday.

From a game born in the suburbs of Melbourne, Australian Rules footy has become a national code – so much so that it is now widely embraced by the many different cultures.

The diehard members of the Richmond Tigers cheerleader team start the festivities while the last siren sounds at the VFL Grand Final of 1974, making them a 41-point win over North Melbourne

The diehard members of the Richmond Tigers cheerleader team start the festivities while the last siren sounds at the VFL Grand Final of 1974, making them a 41-point win over North Melbourne

In the twenty-four years ago, Aussie Rules football became a multicultural code with people like Yogi Thurairatnam (photo) - who fled war-torn Sri Lankan from Australia in the mid-1990s - became fanatic of the sport
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In the twenty-four years ago, Aussie Rules football became a multicultural code with people like Yogi Thurairatnam (photo) - who fled war-torn Sri Lankan from Australia in the mid-1990s - became fanatic of the sport

In the twenty-four years ago, Aussie Rules football became a multicultural code with people like Yogi Thurairatnam (photo) – who fled war-torn Sri Lankan from Australia in the mid-1990s – became fanatic of the sport

The incredible old photos from the 1974 FLF Grand Finale by renowned photographer Rennie Ellis remind us of how many things have changed in recent decades.

Then the members of the Richmond cheerleader were young and white, where now the diehard believers have backgrounds in many cultures.

Yogi Thurairatnam born in Sri Lanka has become a super fan from Richmond since he arrived in Melbourne in 1995 after leaving home.

He was an official member of the cheerleader and did not miss a single match between 2004 and 2018.

& # 39; If they asked me what my religion is, my religion is called AFL, & # 39; said Yogi.

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But it is not only in the stands that things are different, with changes in the field as well.

In 1974, champions such as Royce Hart, Francis Bourke and Kevin Bartlett left fans out of voice after a long day of cheering.

Supporters will still cheer this coming Saturday, but stars like pious Muslim Bachar Houli and the native superstar Daniel Rioli will leave them hoarse.

The 1974 grand finale was the first to be broadcast in color and came at a time when the competition was still a Victorian competition.

A few moments after winning the premiership in 1973, Robert McGhie (in the middle of the photo) was sitting on his holy MCG grass in the middle of his back and lit a cigarette

A few moments after winning the premiership in 1973, Robert McGhie (in the middle of the photo) was sitting on his holy MCG grass in the middle of his back and lit a cigarette

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A few moments after winning the premiership in 1973, Robert McGhie (in the middle of the photo) was sitting on his holy MCG grass in the middle of his back and lit a cigarette

The tattooed defender then rose to his feet and dropped a can of beer hurried to the floor so the parties could begin

The tattooed defender then rose to his feet and dropped a can of beer hurried to the floor so the parties could begin

The tattooed defender then rose to his feet and dropped a can of beer hurried to the floor so the parties could begin

Helen D & # 39; Amico was only 17 when she crossed the MCG and tried to put a scarf around the neck of Carlton champion Bruce Doull (photo) during the VFL Grand Final of 1982

Richmond won his fifth premiere in 14 years in 1980 (photo), with one of the successful players who threw the mug full of beer over his head once back in the dressing rooms
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Richmond won his fifth premiere in 14 years in 1980 (photo), with one of the successful players who threw the mug full of beer over his head once back in the dressing rooms

Richmond won his fifth premiere in 14 years in 1980 (photo), with one of the successful players who threw the mug full of beer over his head once back in the dressing rooms

It would take another 12 years for the Perth-based West Coast Eagles and the Brisbane-based Brisbane Bears to enter the competition in 1987.

Another of Ellis & # 39; most celebrated photos & # 39; s showing how times have changed was taken a year earlier.

A few moments after winning the premiership of 1973, Robert McGhie, halfway through the center, sat exhausted on the holy MCG grass and lit a cigarette.

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The dreaded defender slammed a can of beer on the floor, knocked on the floor to make sure the parties started right after the last siren.

The famous McGhie moment is very different from that seen after the last Richmond victory.

There were no cigarettes or beer left after the Tigers drought-winning victory in 2017, instead, Captain Trent Cotchin conducted a victory round with his daughters in his arms.

Jack Riewoldt, the superstar of the team, then jumped up with the American band The Killers and hit their hit & # 39; Mr. Brightside & # 39; from.

There were no cigarettes or beer left after the drought-breaking victory of the Tigers in 2017, instead, Captain Trent Cotchin (photo) conducted a victory round with his daughters in his arms

There were no cigarettes or beer left after the drought-breaking victory of the Tigers in 2017, instead, Captain Trent Cotchin (photo) conducted a victory round with his daughters in his arms

There were no cigarettes or beer left after the drought-breaking victory of the Tigers in 2017, instead, Captain Trent Cotchin (photo) conducted a victory round with his daughters in his arms

Tigers superstar Dustin Martin rides with the daughter of Richmond captain Trent Cotchin for the AFL Grand Final parade on Friday

Tigers superstar Dustin Martin rides with the daughter of Richmond captain Trent Cotchin for the AFL Grand Final parade on Friday

Tigers superstar Dustin Martin rides with the daughter of Richmond captain Trent Cotchin for the AFL Grand Final parade on Friday

Bachar Houli (photo), a devout Muslim, is far removed from the superstars who have put on the Richmond sweater in recent decades

Bachar Houli (photo), a devout Muslim, is far removed from the superstars who have put on the Richmond sweater in recent decades

Bachar Houli (photo), a devout Muslim, is far removed from the superstars who have put on the Richmond sweater in recent decades

Thousands of fans flocked to the CBD from Melbourne on Friday for the annual Grand Final parade
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Thousands of fans flocked to the CBD from Melbourne on Friday for the annual Grand Final parade

Thousands of fans flocked to the CBD from Melbourne on Friday for the annual Grand Final parade

At the 1982 grand finale, a young Helen D & # 39; Amico was the extra entertainment.

D & # 39; Amico, only 17, made a name for herself when she shot the MCG with a Carlton scarf.

Amico had apparently caught the police on the grounds and ran for a few moments to Carlton legend Bruce Doull to put the scarf around him.

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The moment has since become part of footy folklore, but is something that could never happen today.

With tight patrolling with every move, the best modern players that can get to their fans are superstars like Dustin Martin posing for selfies with fans letting their phones hang over the fence.

These ladies brought their own champagne to the 1970 VFL Grand Final between Collingwood and Carlton

These ladies brought their own champagne to the 1970 VFL Grand Final between Collingwood and Carlton

These ladies brought their own champagne to the 1970 VFL Grand Final between Collingwood and Carlton

Diehard Tigers supporters wore the yellow and black face paint to support their team during the Friday parade

Diehard Tigers supporters wore the yellow and black face paint to support their team during the Friday parade

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Diehard Tigers supporters wore the yellow and black face paint to support their team during the Friday parade

Only medium strength is now available behind the railing on most terrains.

It is far from excited women who brought their own bottles of top-class champagne to the ground.

While Saturday morning customers begin to flow into the MCG, bags are searched from top to bottom amid the ever-present fear of terrorism.

Although things have changed a lot since the 1970s, you have to imagine how different they will be if a team from the western suburbs of Sydney wins their first premiership.

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