Rhode Island Democrats complain that the Senate dress code is biased against whites

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Several young lawmakers in Rhode Island have complained that the senate’s dress code is “ oppressive ” and biased against whites.

The Rhode Island Senate on Tuesday approved a dress code in a 7/29 vote, requiring elected officials to “ wear proper and proper attire, such as blouses, smart slacks, and collared shirts with a matching jacket. ”

And while most Democrats voted to approve the measure, seven left-wing senators, including newly elected Senator Jonathan Acosta, 31, were of the opinion.

Acosta, speaking on the floor during a debate on the matter, claimed it was “ super inappropriate ” for a white, male Senate president to “ make a normative judgment ” about what people could wear.

“These rules make it okay for us to judge people based on the way they dress or how they look, and I just think that’s super problematic,” Acosta said.

He called the dress code ‘oppressive’ and added, ‘People use expressions like’ professional ‘,’ presentable ‘and’ appropriate ‘. What they mean is white collars, white western clothes. ‘

Several young lawmakers in Rhode Island have complained that the senate's dress code is `` oppressive '' and biased against whites.  Newly elected Senator Jonathan Acosta, 31, slammed the code into a debate on Tuesday

Several young lawmakers in Rhode Island have complained that the senate’s dress code is “ oppressive ” and biased against whites. Newly elected Senator Jonathan Acosta, 31, slammed the code into a debate on Tuesday

Acosta claimed the Senate dress code is not widely enforced, saying he has been wearing cardigans, sweatpants and Air Jordan sneakers for weeks.

Acosta claimed the Senate dress code is not widely enforced, saying he has been wearing cardigans, sweatpants and Air Jordan sneakers for weeks.

Acosta claimed the Senate dress code is not widely enforced, saying he has been wearing cardigans, sweatpants and Air Jordan sneakers for weeks.

Acosta is casually portrayed holding a Green New Deal Pledge in hand

Acosta is casually portrayed holding a Green New Deal Pledge in hand

Acosta is casually portrayed holding a Green New Deal Pledge in hand

During the debate, Acosta purposefully donned a black guayabera – a traditional Caribbean shirt without a collar.

Acosta claimed the Senate The dress code is not widely enforced, saying he has been wearing cardigans, sweatpants and Air Jordan sneakers for weeks.

“I assure you that what I wear will not affect the quality of the work I do,” he said.

The former teacher went on to say, ‘In my freshman year, I wore a shirt and tie every day and I realized that what I was doing was reaffirming all the black and brown poor kids that to be successful you had to try to look as much and approach whiteness. ‘

“That’s the message you’d force all Rhode Island residents down their throats [with the dress code], ‘Added Acosta.

He was supported by several other newly elected Democratic senators, including Senator Cynthia Mendes.

“I assure you that what I wear will not affect the quality of the work I do,” Acosta said

Senator Cynthia Mendes stated, “When powerful men dictate decorum and make demands on our bodies and clothes, it translates into … colonization language.”

Newly elected Senator Tiara Mack agreed, saying, `` I am not lost that respectability politics is often something used to control black and brown bodies and women's bodies. ''

Newly elected Senator Tiara Mack agreed, saying, `` I am not lost that respectability politics is often something used to control black and brown bodies and women's bodies ''

Newly elected Senator Tiara Mack agreed, saying, “ I am not lost that respectability politics is often something used to control black and brown bodies and women’s bodies. ”

“When powerful men dictate decorum and make demands on our bodies and clothes, that translates into … colonization language,” she said.

The need to remind everyone in power – it always started with what you tell them to do with their bodies. You will know when you see it. ‘

Newly elected Senator Tiara Mack agreed, saying, “I am not lost that politics of respectability is often something used to control black and brown bodies and women’s bodies.”

However, some Democrats disagreed.

Senator Louis DiPalma argued that the clothing supply was about showing respect.

‘It’s not about judging what someone looks like. A dress code and decorum is about respecting an institution that is over 200 years old, ‘he said.

Meanwhile, Republican Senator Gordon Rogers, who comes from a rural area, said he supported the dress rules even when he admitted it was difficult to trade his beloved Chippewa boots for dress shoes and second-hand suits to enter the room.

“It’s not about denying anyone the right to vote,” said the businessman and farmer to applause. “Sometimes you have to command respect.”

Republican Senator Gordon Rogers, from a rural area, said he supported the dress rules, even though he admitted it was difficult to trade his beloved Chippewa boots for dress shoes.

Republican Senator Gordon Rogers, from a rural area, said he supported the dress rules, even though he admitted it was difficult to trade his beloved Chippewa boots for dress shoes.

Republican Senator Gordon Rogers, from a rural area, said he supported the dress rules, even though he admitted it was difficult to trade his beloved Chippewa boots for dress shoes.