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In 2015, the 16-year-old died in Alice Springs due to abuse of volatile substances. A 15-year-old child from Redcliffe, Queensland also died a year later for abuse of deodorant products (pictured children sniff deodorant)

Rexona KILLS five Australian children after they used it to get high – as retailers reveal the deodorant that promises & # 39; never to abandon you & # 39; is the number one choice for junkies

  • Four people died in Queensland and one died in New South Wales
  • Children inhale the deodorant in a dangerous trend called chroming
  • The parent company of Rexona has tried in vain to change its chemicals
  • Unilever has spent $ 1.4 billion on development and education
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At least five people died from breathing in Rexona, despite the fact that more than a billion dollars were spent to make the deodorant safe.

Police and retailers have identified the deodorant that uses the slogan & it will not disappoint you & # 39; as the most popular product for kids who want to get high.

Rexona's parent company, Unilever, said it was aware of four deaths in Queensland and one death in New South Wales due to & # 39; chrome plating & # 39 ;.

A 16-year-old also died in Alice Springs due to abuse of volatile substances.

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Unilever said it spent $ 1.4 billion on research and development in the past fiscal year to adjust the formula of the deodorant to reduce the number of deaths from & # 39; chrome plating & # 39; to decrease.

In 2015, the 16-year-old died in Alice Springs due to abuse of volatile substances. A 15-year-old child from Redcliffe, Queensland also died a year later for abuse of deodorant products (pictured children sniff deodorant)

In 2015, the 16-year-old died in Alice Springs due to abuse of volatile substances. A 15-year-old child from Redcliffe, Queensland also died a year later for abuse of deodorant products (pictured children sniff deodorant)

& # 39; We have changed the can, including the affixing of warning labels on the package, in particular mentioning misuse of solvents, & # 39; told Unilever Australia and head of deodorant Scott Mingl from New Zealand ABC Radio Brisbane.

& # 39; Just as we redesigned the can so that you can't even isolate the gas these children use to get high themselves. & # 39;

WHAT IS & # 39; CHROMED & # 39 ;?

  • When a person inhales solvents or other household chemicals to get high.
  • Chrome plating makes the user feel sleepy, relaxed and happy, excited or restless, uncoordinated and less inhibited about taking risks.
  • If someone inhales chemicals for too long, they can suffer from brain damage, damage to internal organs, anger problems and changes in their thinking patterns.

Source: Reach Out

Mr. Mingl said that Unilever was the & # 39; silver bullet & # 39; was unable to find despite investment in education and development.

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He said the company feared that changing the chemicals in Rexona could lead teenagers to use cleaning solutions or pesticides.

Mr. Mingl also explained that the chemicals in Rexona were no different from other products on the market.

Dominique Lamb, Chief Executive of the National Retailers Association, said piles of Rexona cans were found in chrome-plated places with the most cans stolen.

& # 39; We see that in a number of locations there may be piles of more than 30 cans at a time, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; We also encounter, or our safety in, shopping centers, groups of young people who are clearly under the influence. & # 39;

Four people were killed in Queensland and one in New South Wales due to children who inhaled solvents, including Rexona deodorant, or household chemicals to get high (stock image)
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Four people were killed in Queensland and one in New South Wales due to children who inhaled solvents, including Rexona deodorant, or household chemicals to get high (stock image)

Four people were killed in Queensland and one in New South Wales due to children who inhaled solvents, including Rexona deodorant, or household chemicals to get high (stock image)

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