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Retail manager, 23, tells how she got caught up in a shopping addiction

A 23-year-old Melbourne retail manager has revealed how she got caught up in a shopping addiction where she spent ‘almost all of her’ salary in days and then lived on less than $ 50 for 14 days before getting paid again.

Natasha Djuric said that she had an ‘itch’ to shop for as long as she can remember, and even in her teens she would be obsessed with ‘buying things that made me happy.’

But by the time Natasha turned 23, she said she was using her credit card to the max, paying off fortnightly payments into her Zippay and Afterpay accounts all the time, and “ buying everything I was comfortable with. ”

“I couldn’t control myself,” Natasha told FEMAIL.

“It was a vicious cycle; I always said that I would stop tomorrow, on Monday or the next paycheck. And then it would start all over again. ‘

A 23-year-old Melbourne retail manager has revealed how she got into the grip of a shopping addiction where she spent 'almost all of her' salary in days and then had to live on less than $ 50 for 14 days before getting paid again (Natasha Djuric pictured )

A 23-year-old Melbourne retail manager revealed how she got caught up in a shopping addiction where she spent ‘almost all of her’ salary in days and then had to live on less than $ 50 for 14 days before getting paid again (Natasha Djuric pictured )

Natasha Djuric (pictured) said that she had an 'itch' to shop for as long as she can remember, and even in her teens she would be obsessed with 'buying things that made me happy'

Natasha Djuric (pictured) said that she had an 'itch' to shop for as long as she can remember, and even in her teens she would be obsessed with 'buying things that made me happy'

Natasha Djuric (pictured) said that she had an ‘itch’ to shop for as long as she can remember, and even in her teens she would be obsessed with ‘buying things that made me happy’

Natasha said her purchases were not limited to clothes, but clothes were a big part of what she bought as soon as she had money:

“Over the years, the kind of things I would buy regularly changed a lot, but it was clothes on clothes in recent years,” she said.

‘In my current job, I work in a department store, so the temptation to buy fashion items is enormous.

“I didn’t want to miss anything, and I felt that my self-esteem was better and that I would be more attractive if I had a little more to offer than the next person.

“I think I bought my way through my life to feel better.”

Natasha worked in a department store and said that the temptation to buy fashion items (photo) was 'huge' and that she always wanted something new

Natasha worked in a department store and said that the temptation to buy fashion items (photo) was 'huge' and that she always wanted something new

Natasha worked in a department store and said that the temptation to buy fashion items (photo) was ‘huge’ and that she always wanted something new

What is an addiction to shopping?

Compulsive shopping is often referred to as ‘buying disorder’ (BSD).

* Although not officially recognized as a standalone diagnosis, it is characterized by the extreme desire to shop or search for consumer goods.

* Those who are addicted to shopping will often spend more than they can afford and experience debt after purchase, and may even shop more to feel better, creating a vicious cycle.

* You can recognize that you have a shopping addiction if you feel that you cannot stop shopping online, even if you wanted or tried to quit without success.

* You can also have a shopping addiction if you are angry or upset if you cannot stop.

Source: Addiction center

Natasha said she is “unsure” of an exact amount of how much she spends because it would fluctuate that way.

However, it was certainly more than $ 1,000 a month in non-essential items like luxury pieces.

“I was sure that I would get paid every two weeks and that I would have to use some of it to settle my debts on Afterpay,” she said.

“There were times when I would spend my entire ‘budgeted allowance’ in two days and then force myself to live on $ 50 or less for two weeks.

“Then it occurred to me – that I could no longer physically spend normal money; everything I bought was divided into four payments in my head. ‘

She added, “I was totally unable to spend my money responsibly.”

The only credit that Natasha said she gave herself was that she was always strict with her repayments, even though it meant she had run out of money that month.

“There were times when I would spend my entire ‘budgeted allowance’ in two days and then force myself to live on $ 50 or less for two weeks,” Natasha (photo) told FEMAIL

Natasha said the realization that she needed to change has struck her since she was in the isolation period of the coroan virus.

“Strangely, this entire isolation period has helped me recognize how much money I could have saved, and put everything into perspective and taught me the difference between needing and wanting something,” she said.

Natasha said her boyfriend was one of the “main motivations” for her to stop publishing, and he “told me to break up with all kinds of arrangements, which really helped.”

Natasha (pictured) said the realization that she needed to change has hit her since she was in the isolation period of the coroan virus and she has settled all her Afterpay and Zippay debts

Natasha (pictured) said the realization that she needed to change has hit her since she was in the isolation period of the coroan virus and she has settled all her Afterpay and Zippay debts

Natasha (pictured) said the realization that she needed to change has hit her since she was in the isolation period of the coroan virus and she has settled all her Afterpay and Zippay debts

Natasha said that after years as a shopping addict, she finally realizes it’s okay to ‘wear the same 10 times.’

“I learned that you should treat yourself to an investment buy, like a good winter coat that you can wear every day at work instead of something you will wear once on a night out,” she said.

“By no means have I grown into shopping, but I definitely broke the cycle of putting myself in and realized how harmful can be so frivolous.”

The 23-year-old’s Afterpay and Zippay accounts have now been paid off and her credit card has been cut into small pieces and canceled to prevent her from using it.

“It was so good to learn how good it feels to have money for emergencies,” said Natasha.

“You never know when you need it, but it’s the most important thing.

“I am so excited to build a financial future for myself and experience things I have worked hard for. The only person you should trust is yourself. ‘

Natasha has her own website where she writes about her financial situation and her shopping addiction. For more information, click here.

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