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Retail apocalypse hits Brighton Le-Sands while the beach strip turns into a ghost town with empty shops

Australia’s retail apocalypse causes “haunted stores” to appear on an ever-thriving strip – because owners can’t afford to keep them open

  • Once the busy business strip on the beach in southern Sydney had become a ghost town
  • Photos posted online show Brighton Le-Sands full of vacant properties for rent
  • The local population attributed a wide range of reasons for the demise, including rising rents

A business strip on the beach has been transformed into a ghost town because companies are closing their stores due to rising costs.

Brighton Le-Sands, a suburb on the bay in southern Sydney, has fallen victim to the apocalypse in Australia.

Grim pictures on a Facebook page of a community show an ever busy Bay Street full of empty shops with rental signs that adorn the windows.

Below the vacant building there used to be a popular pizzeria on the strip a short walk from the waterfront.

A formal clothing store that was once next door also seems vacant.

The former Le Sands Pizzeria is one of the vacant buildings on Bay Street, Brighton Le-Sands. A formal clothing store next door also seems to be empty

The former Le Sands Pizzeria is one of the vacant buildings on Bay Street, Brighton Le-Sands. A formal clothing store next door also seems to be empty

This empty building still has the old faded Civic Video sign visible to passers-by

This empty building still has the old faded Civic Video sign visible to passers-by

This empty building still has the old faded Civic Video sign visible to passers-by

Bay Street (pictured in 2015 with the now closed formal clothing store and pizzeria) was once a thriving strip before it became a ghost town

Bay Street (pictured in 2015 with the now closed formal clothing store and pizzeria) was once a thriving strip before it became a ghost town

Bay Street (pictured in 2015 with the now closed formal clothing store and pizzeria) was once a thriving strip before it became a ghost town

Another empty building with a store on the ground floor and an office suite on the first floor was once a video store, where the faded sign still hangs.

“Many businesses are closed and in some cases there have been empty spaces for years,” said a man on the Brighton Le-Sands 2216 page.

“I see the” pre-lease “signs, but nobody seems to be leasing. Whether it is the prices or competition, or the owners for whatever reason do not want to rent, I am not sure. “

“I counted six within 20 meters of each other. I know some of those buildings are being demolished and rebuilt, but the ‘for lease’ is still there, so the rebuilding is unlikely to happen for a while. “

The post led to an online debate among the locals, who identified a wide range of reasons for the district’s demise from rising business rents and lack of variation to over-development, parking and non-spending visitors.

“As a local for the past 34 years, I can tell you that it has gone downhill. Many factors due. The lack of police action has exacerbated the problem. Overdevelopment without looking ahead to parking and other facilities, it is no wonder that the site has gone down the toilet. Then you all wonder why companies don’t last long and others who see Brighton as a location for their company running through the hills, “said a long-time resident.

Another added: ‘Such a shame. Brighton could be such a cool suburb and thrive! Were they not going to build a pier? It could have been so family oriented and a nice suburb with things to do and see. “

A booming Bay Street in 2009 for rising rents forced companies to close their doors

A booming Bay Street in 2009 for rising rents forced companies to close their doors

A booming Bay Street in 2009 for rising rents forced companies to close their doors

A local claimed that Daily Mail Australia business rents in the dying area were too expensive, an opinion that many others reflected on Facebook.

“I have seen them come back over the years. A store owner said she could no longer pay the rent, so she packed it up, “a woman commented.

Others blamed the visitors for the demise of the area.

“The public that comes to Brighton is young and does not spend money. The oldies do not want to leave because of the young hooligans. Further up in Ramsgate, businesses are thriving, “one commented.

Another addition: ‘The clientele does not spend and also ensures that the local population does not shop there for many reasons. It looks busy, but stores don’t earn money. “

The local population listed a large number of reasons for the growing number of businesses that closed their stores

The local population listed a large number of reasons for the growing number of businesses that closed their stores

The local population listed a large number of reasons for the growing number of businesses that closed their stores

Daily Mail Australia has contacted Bayside Council for comments.

The district is currently subject to a staged master plan from the municipality, which initially looked at parking before investigating the problems of retail, land use and urban design in the village center.

An assessment of the site in 2017 showed that although the center is a weekly shopping destination for residents and includes entertainment and dining options, there was a low vacancy rate for commercial and retail store fronts, St George Leader reported.

A local resident who posted the grim photos on a community Facebook page said he counted six empty stores less than 20 meters apart in Brighton Le-Sands

A local resident who posted the grim photos on a community Facebook page said he counted six empty stores less than 20 meters apart in Brighton Le-Sands

A local resident who posted the grim photos on a community Facebook page said he counted six empty stores less than 20 meters apart in Brighton Le-Sands

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