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A man lies on top of a planter on South Hope Street in Los Angeles - Peter Mogzo has placed around 140 boxes along the streets to prevent homeless people from putting up their tents

LA residents turn to spiky plants to stop the homeless from sleeping on their streets

  • Angelenos grow thorny plants and use fences to combat homelessness
  • One man has set up 140 planters along the street to prevent tents from being set up
  • Residents break municipal regulations to keep their streets free
  • Officials estimate that 59,000 homeless people live in Los Angeles County
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Residents and businesses in Los Angeles set up fences, put boxes of dirt and growing thorny plants to make homeless people sleep on the street.

Angelenos break the municipal rules in their & # 39; desperate & # 39; response to the ever-growing army of homeless people in their city.

Peter Mozgo and his wife Maria took action after their Hungarian cultural alliance on South Hope Street started losing bookings due to the small tent city on the sidewalk outside.

The St Francis Center, which helps homeless people and very poor families, is next to the hall. Potential customers sent them text messages saying: "I'm sorry, I really like your place, but the street is unacceptable."

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A man lies on top of a planter on South Hope Street in Los Angeles - Peter Mogzo has placed around 140 boxes along the streets to prevent homeless people from putting up their tents

A man lies on top of a planter on South Hope Street in Los Angeles – Peter Mogzo has placed around 140 boxes along the streets to prevent homeless people from putting up their tents

A homeless man still managed to find a place to set up the camp in an opening behind the planters and the wall

A homeless man still managed to find a place to set up the camp in an opening behind the planters and the wall

A homeless man still managed to find a place to set up the camp in an opening behind the planters and the wall

& # 39; We have lost so many weddings because people no longer want to rent it & # 39 ;, Mozgo told the LA Times.

So he bought large wooden planters, painted them bright red, filled them with earth, and placed them along the sidewalk outside Washington Boulevard and 18th Street.

Every morning, Mozgo inspects the street, so see what has changed.

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& # 39; How many tents do we have today? And who came in? And who moved? And who turned over my boxes? And who graffiti ed the front of my work? & # 39;

& # 39; To make room for tents, I can see it from their perspective & # 39; said David Canup, who lived in the area for seven months homeless.

& # 39; But there is more a sense of being pushed out. & # 39;

He is not the only one. Planters have appeared near Venice, while companies in parts of South LA have installed chain links.

& # 39; In general, many things that people [may] have in public transit law are not allowed & # 39 ;, Deputy City Engineer Ted Allen told the LA Times.

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& # 39; The city will continue to cite illegal fencing and planters that restrict public right of way & # 39 ;, said spokeswoman Elena Stern of Bureau of Street Services.

But business owners say that authorities enforce referrals only when they receive a formal complaint.

A street in LA & Koreatown, where the locals make the planter explode to prevent the homeless from sleeping there
A street in LA & Koreatown, where the locals make the planter explode to prevent the homeless from sleeping there

Before and after the recordings of LA & Koreatown, where the locals laid down seed potatoes to stop homeless people who slept there

Last month the authorities indicated that there were approximately 59,000 homeless people living in the province of Los Angeles, of which 36,000 in the smaller city of LA.

The town hall estimates that three-quarters of them sleep in the streets and open areas of the city.

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Rents are so high in LA that non-homeowners spend on average 41 percent of their income on housing.

While the median family income is $ 69,300 a year in LA County, the median rent is more than $ 100,000.

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