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Researchers have found the earliest direct evidence of milk consumption anywhere in the world in the teeth of prehistoric British farmers from the Midlands and the South

Eating dairy is perhaps & # 39; widespread & # 39; been among old British, because 6,000 year old teeth reveal the earliest evidence that people consume milk

  • Archaeologists from the University of York found milk protein in a 6000-year-old plaque
  • The samples from Study are the oldest to be analyzed worldwide for old proteins
  • The neolithic period of Great Britain ran from 4000-2.400 BC. And saw the rise of agriculture
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The earliest direct evidence of milk consumption has been found in the teeth of prehistoric British farmers.

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Experts from the University of York made the discovery after identifying a milk protein called beta-lactoglobulin in the mineralized plaque of seven people who lived in the neolithic period about 6,000 years ago.

According to scientists behind the study, it is considered to be & # 39; the world's first identification of the whey protein, often called BLG.

The tested remains come from three different neolithic locations – Hambledon Hill and Hazleton North in southern England and Banbury Lane in the East Midlands.

Researchers have found the earliest direct evidence of milk consumption anywhere in the world in the teeth of prehistoric British farmers from the Midlands and the South

Researchers have found the earliest direct evidence of milk consumption anywhere in the world in the teeth of prehistoric British farmers from the Midlands and the South

WHEN DO PEOPLE MAKE CHEESE?

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During excavations of old earthenware, researchers found remains of a feta-like cheese on the remains of rhyton drinking horns and seven from 5,300 BC.

Access to milk and cheese is linked to the spread of agriculture throughout Europe, around 9,000 years ago.

The two villages, Pokrovnik and Danilo Bitinj, were between 6000 and 4800 BC. Occupied and have different types of pottery during that period.

The inhabitants of these villages seem to have used specific types of earthenware for the production of various foods, with cheese residues most often occurring on rhyta and sieves.

According to the latest findings, cheese was established in the Mediterranean 7,200 years ago.

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Fermented dairy products were easier for Neolithic people to store and had a relatively low lactose content.

It would have been an important food source for all ages in early farming populations.

The authors thus suggest that cheese production and associated ceramic technology were important factors that helped the expansion of early farmers to northern and central Europe.

Individuals from all three locations demonstrated the presence of milk proteins from cows, sheep or goats, suggesting that people exploited multiple types for dairy products.

Dental plaque can offer unique insights into the diet of old people because proteins in the diet are captured when it is mineralized by components of saliva to form tartar or "tartar," the researchers say.

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The lead author of the study, Dr. Sophy Charlton, of the Department of Archeology at the University of York, said: & # 39; The fact that we have found this protein in the tartar of individuals from three different neolithic sites may suggest that dairy consumption widespread food practices in the past.

& # 39; It would be a fascinating way for further research to look at more individuals and see if we can determine if there are patterns about who consumed milk in the archaeological past – perhaps the amount of dairy products or the animals used varied the lines by gender, gender, age or social status. & # 39;

The discovery of milk proteins is particularly interesting because recent genetic studies suggest that people who currently lived were not yet able to digest the lactose in milk.

To circumvent this, the old farmers may have only drunk small amounts of milk or processed them into other foods such as cheese.

The discovery of milk proteins is particularly interesting because recent genetic studies suggest that people who were currently living were not yet able to digest the lactose in milk

The discovery of milk proteins is particularly interesting because recent genetic studies suggest that people who were currently living were not yet able to digest the lactose in milk

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The discovery of milk proteins is particularly interesting because recent genetic studies suggest that people who were currently living were not yet able to digest the lactose in milk

So-called "lactase persistence", which allows the consumption of milk into adulthood, is the result of a genetic mutation in a part of DNA that controls the activity of the lactase gene.

However, the mechanisms behind how and when we have developed this ability remain a mystery.

Dr. Charlton added: “Drinking no more than very small amounts of milk would have made people from this period really ill, so these early farmers may have incorporated milk, perhaps into foods such as cheese, to reduce lactose levels. to lower.

& # 39; Identifying older persons with evidence of future BLG can provide more insight into past milk consumption and processing, and increase our understanding of how genetics and culture have worked together to produce lactase persistence. & # 39;

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The data is published at the University of York website.

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT NEOLITHIC BRITAIN?

The neolithic revolution was & # 39; the world's first verifiable revolution in agriculture.

It began in Britain between around 5,000 BC and 4,500 BC, but spread throughout Europe, originally in Syria and Iraq, between around 11,000 BC and 9,000 BC.

The period saw the widespread transition of many disparate human cultures from nomadic hunting and gathering methods to agriculture and building small settlements.

Stonehenge, the most famous prehistoric structure in Europe, possibly the world, was built by Neolithic people and later added during the early Bronze Age

Stonehenge, the most famous prehistoric structure in Europe, possibly the world, was built by Neolithic people and later added during the early Bronze Age

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Stonehenge, the most famous prehistoric structure in Europe, possibly the world, was built by Neolithic people and later added during the early Bronze Age

The revolution was responsible for changing small groups of travelers into established communities that built villages and towns.

Some cultures used irrigation and forest clearing to improve their farming techniques.

Others saved food for times of hunger, and agriculture eventually created different roles and labor divisions in societies and trading economies.

In the UK, the period was set in motion by an enormous migration or popular movement from the Channel.

The Neolithic revolution saw people in Britain move from groups of nomadic hunter-gatherers to established communities. Some of the earliest monuments in Britain are neolithic structures, including Silbury Hill in Wiltshire (photo)
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The Neolithic revolution saw people in Britain move from groups of nomadic hunter-gatherers to established communities. Some of the earliest monuments in Britain are neolithic structures, including Silbury Hill in Wiltshire (photo)

The Neolithic revolution saw people in Britain move from groups of nomadic hunter-gatherers to established communities. Some of the earliest monuments in Britain are neolithic structures, including Silbury Hill in Wiltshire (photo)

Today prehistoric monuments in the UK extend from the time of the Neolithic peasants to the invasion of the Romans in 43 AD.

Many of them are cared for by English heritage and range from standing stones to solid stone circles, and from burial mounds to hill forts.

Stonehenge, the most famous prehistoric structure in Europe, possibly the world, was built by Neolithic people and was later completed during the Bronze Age.

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Neolithic structures were mostly used for ceremonies, religious festivals and as centers for trade and social gatherings.

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