WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Researcher stumbles on enormous woolly mammoth TUSK protruding from riverbank in remote Alaska

Everything is fossil! Researcher discovers woolly mammoth TUSK sticking out of riverbank in remote Alaska

  • UVA research specialist Adrienne Ghaly stumbled upon a huge woolly mammoth tusk sticking out of the dirt from the bank of the Koyukuk River last week
  • “You can almost touch the #pleistocene,” she wrote in a tweet
  • University of Alaska Fairbanks discovered the huge fossil between one and two years ago and has been tracking it ever since
  • Since its discovery, the tusk has been tied to the riverbank to prevent it from falling in
  • It is not uncommon to find remains of woolly mammoths, which are extinct in Alaska. Teeth, bones and even carcasses have been found in the state

A University of Virginia researcher hiking in the remote Yukon region of Alaska came across a huge woolly mammoth tusk sticking out of the dirt from the bank of the Koyukuk River last week.

“You can almost touch the #Pleistocene,” Adrienne Ghaly, UVA Environmental Humanities research specialist, posted a photo of the ancient tooth stuck in river debris near the town of Coldfoot.

She said the University of Alaska Fairbanks first discovered the huge fossil — mammoths died about 10,000 years ago — a year or two ago and tied it to the riverbank with ropes.

University researchers have also trained a camera on the tusk to view it remotely.

University of Virginia researcher Adrienne Ghaly captured this photo of a woolly mammoth tusk (circled) found on the Koyukuk River near Coldfoot, Alaska

University of Virginia researcher Adrienne Ghaly captured this photo of a woolly mammoth tusk (circled) found on the Koyukuk River near Coldfoot, Alaska

'You can almost touch the #pleistocene,' Andrienne Ghaly posted a photo of the ancient tooth stuck in the river's mud near the town of Coldfoot

‘You can almost touch the #pleistocene,’ Andrienne Ghaly posted a photo of the ancient tooth stuck in the river’s mud near the town of Coldfoot

University of Alaska researchers tied up a woolly mammoth tusk on the bank of the Koyukuk River with ropes so it wouldn't wash away

University of Alaska researchers tied up a woolly mammoth tusk on the bank of the Koyukuk River with ropes so it wouldn’t wash away

59019541 10912027 image a 7 1655141743331

Remains of woolly mammoths, which went extinct 10,000 years ago, are still being discovered in Alaska

“U Alaska Fairbanks has been watching it since it was discovered,” Ghaly tweeted. “They have a camera on it and ropes (the black lines) are tied to it to make sure it doesn’t fall into the river. They scanned it to see if there’s more #mammoth, but no – just one tusk.”

University of Virginia researcher Adrienne Ghaly snapped a photo of a mammoth fossil while trekking in Alaska

University of Virginia researcher Adrienne Ghaly snapped a photo of a mammoth fossil while trekking in Alaska

As unusual as it may seem to find a prehistoric elephant bone on the coast, in Alaska, finding remains of a woolly mammoth is so common that in 1986, remains of the creature were named the state fossil.

Skeletons, teeth and even carcasses with intact stomach contents have been found in both the northern state and Siberia.

Mammoths grew to the same size as modern-day elephants, weighing about six tons, but were covered in fur and had smaller ears.

Research on their bones has become so advanced, using detailed isotope analysis, that researchers were able to track the life and death of a 17,000-year-old male mammoth they named “Kik” last year.

“From the time they are born to the day they die, they have a diary and it’s in their tusks,” said Pat Druckenmiller, paleontologist and director of the University of Alaska Museum of the North.

“Mother Nature doesn’t usually offer such helpful and lifelong records of one’s life.”

Research on mammoth bones has become so advanced that last year researchers were able to track the life and death of a 17,000-year-old male mammoth they named

Research on mammoth bones has become so advanced that last year researchers were able to track the life and death of a 17,000-year-old male mammoth they named “Kik.” dr. Matthew Wooller (pictured) and his colleagues at the University of Alaska were able to determine that the ancient animal fed on grass and remained within the herd until age 15.

A split mammoth tusk, used for analysis, sits on the lab bench in the Alaska Stable Isotope Facility at the University of Alaska Fairbanks

A split mammoth tusk, used for analysis, sits on the lab bench in the Alaska Stable Isotope Facility at the University of Alaska Fairbanks

Kik was a 28-year-old male mammoth who lived while Earth was still in the midst of the Ice Age, although Alaska was largely free of glaciers.

Through analysis, Dr. Matthew Wooller and his colleagues at the Alaska Stable Isotope Facility at the University of Alaska determine that the ancient animal fed on grass and remained within the herd until age 15, when it left the herd. like modern elephants do.

Wooller’s study showed the length of Kik’s journey.

“It’s not clear if it was a seasonal puller, but it covered serious ground,” Wooller said. “It visited many parts of Alaska at one point in its life, which is quite amazing when you consider how big that area is.”

The creature appears to have been born in central Alaska, but died on the northern slope of the state, above the Arctic Circle, far from where Ghaly’s tusk was found. Researchers found that the mammoth likely starved to death after walking around an area with little grass.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More