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Research shows that people reach their happiest at 82 and parts of the brain improve as we get older

Life starts at 80! Large research shows that people reach their happiest at 82 and parts of the brain improve as we get older

  • Daniel Levitin researched myths about aging memory loss
  • He discovered that life “only gets better” in terms of general mental satisfaction
  • People become more empathetic and better equipped to meet challenges

People reach their happiest age of 82 and parts of the brain improve even as we age, according to a top neuroscientist.

Daniel Levitin conducted the study to unravel myths about aging, including memory loss and difficulties in learning new skills.

He discovered that life “only gets better” in terms of general mental satisfaction and problem solving, also continues to progress into old age, as part of his research for his new book The Changing Mind: A Neuroscientist’s Guide to Aging Well.

People reach their happiest age of 82 and parts of the brain improve even as we age, according to a top neuroscientist (stock image)

People reach their happiest age of 82 and parts of the brain improve even as we age, according to a top neuroscientist (stock image)

During the Good Morning Sunday of Radio 2, Mr. Levitin said: ‘Neurosciences have discovered the last ten years … [that] your memory will not necessarily be affected as you get older.

“Another big myth is that older adults are depressed.

“But the average peak age of happiness in 72 countries is 82 years old and I think we can push that out for another ten years if we can fight both age and medical technology.

“We tend to consider aging as this process from birth and if you are lucky you can continue to do it.

‘Aging is everyone’s favorite alternative to death.

“The story is that you keep acquiring skills and getting better to a point, and then you lose things like crumbling bits of the Rock of Gibraltar.

“But in fact for the past ten years we have had strong evidence that a number of brain functions are actually improving, right up to the end.”

Levitin added that the majority of people are becoming more empathetic and better equipped to face life challenges – both for themselves and for others.

Clint Eastwood

Clint Eastwood

Dalai Lama

Dalai Lama

Mr. Levitin was also in contact with prominent members of the parent community as part of his research, including Clint Eastwood, 89, (left) the Dalai Lama, 84, (right), and Stevie Wonder, 69.

The scientist also had contact with prominent members of the older community as part of his research, including Clint Eastwood, 89, the Dalai Lama, 84, and Stevie Wonder, 69.

Mr. Levitin was asked what Clint Eastwood’s secret for happiness was in old age, when he said, “He told me,” I just won’t let the old man in. ”

Daniel Levitin’s top tips for happiness in old age

1. Do not retire to ensure that your mind is stimulated by something meaningful

2. Practice to release endorphins and to produce a naturally happy high.

3. Try new things to promote cognitive activity

4. Moderation and variation in eating and drinking is the key to a balanced lifestyle

5. Keep your social circle exciting and new because meeting strangers engages every part of the brain

Talked about the DaLai Lama, Mr. Levitin said: “He is one of the happiest people out there and laughs a lot.

‘He is 84 and has published 125 books – one of them last year.

“His greatest piece of wisdom? Nine hours of sleep every night. “

Levitin’s research also showed that religious people were happier than people without faith.

This is because such dedication is often accompanied by gratitude, regardless of material possessions or value.

Similarly, even the shortest contact with strangers every day is beneficial to the mind.

Citing research from Professor and Professor Stanford University, graduated from Professor Barbara Fredrickson, he added: “Her happiness research shows the greatest factor in influencing whether you will be happy all day long and have microcontacts with you throughout your life people you don’t know.

“A small conversation of ten seconds here and there.”

He said meeting new people involved all parts of the brain, from deciphering facial movements, speech and tone of voice to what affects how to respond and present to a stranger.

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