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More than 10% of the over-65s in the US drink five or more drinks at least once a month, increasing their risk of heart disease or falls and aggravating illnesses.

More than one in 10 adults in the US continues to drink with binge, according to a new study.

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Drinking five or more drinks down at once is dangerous – and can be especially for fall-prone older adults.

In addition, alcohol can cause or worsen risks for chronic diseases such as heart or liver disease and high blood pressure.

Although bing drinkers were actually less likely to have multiple chronic diseases, they were more likely to go to first aid, underlining the potential risks that seniors may not be aware of, warns the New York University team.

In recent years, the most typically rebellious age group – noisy teenagers – have drunk, smoked and had less sex, but American adults have picked up their slacks in heavy drinking.

More than 10% of the over-65s in the US drink five or more drinks at least once a month, increasing their risk of heart disease or falls and aggravating illnesses.

More than 10% of the over-65s in the US drink five or more drinks at least once a month, increasing their risk of heart disease or falls and aggravating illnesses.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that one out of six adults eat and eat four times a month.

Seniors, according to the new study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, are no exception.

And more of them are lifting more glasses than in recent years.

Previous studies have shown that between 7.7 and nine percent of people over the age of 65 drank five or more drinks on one night (or day).

Now that number has risen to 10.6 percent, who had used at least one binging bend in the last month.

Heavy session drinkers were more often men, smokers and, oddly enough, people in relatively good health – or at least no more suffering than with chronic ailments.

& # 39; This may be because some people stop drinking or drink less when they have an illness or alcohol-related illness & # 39 ;, said Dr. Benjamin Han, lead author of the study.

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Among those who drank binge and suffered from a chronic illness, most had high blood pressure, with 41.4 percent suffering from the condition, followed by heart disease and diabetes.

Drinking a lot for many years or even decades can itself raise blood pressure and even cause heart disease.

So while a glass of wine could protect your heart, as some studies have suggested, five or six or more have the opposite effect.

Aging is the most important risk factor for cancers together and binge drinking is linked to higher risks for certain types of the disease, such as colorectal, esophagus, breast, mouth and tongue cancers.

Plus, binge drinking overwhelms the liver, and can cause scarring, liver disease and contribute to liver cancer.

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Alcohol is also harmful to memory, and with rising incurable Alzheimer's, older Americans must protect their ability to remember as well as possible.

Then of course there are the accidents: falls, burns, crashes, cuts, scrapes, sprains and fractures.

These accidents are risky enough for a younger adult.

But for older Americans, a trip to the ER or a broken bone can be the trigger for their ultimate decline to death.

More older Americans are also accumulating an extra risk by smoking more marijuana.

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Although the drug does not have such serious consequences as binge drinking – which can even be fatal – it only increases the disorder that a binge drinker suffers, making them even more inclined to injure themselves.

& # 39; The association between excessive drinking and cannabis use has important health consequences & # 39 ;, said co-author Dr. Joseph Palamar.

& # 39; Both uses can lead to higher effects of impairment.

& # 39; This is especially important as cannabis use is becoming increasingly common among older adults and older adults may not be aware of the potential dangers of using cannabis with alcohol. & # 39;

And the researchers say it doesn't matter if seniors binge only occasionally. If you do this, it will entail risks that are not worth the potential damage that older Americans can suffer.

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"Binge drinking, even occasionally or rarely, can have a negative impact on other health problems by making the disease worse, interacting with prescription drugs and complicating disease management," Dr. said. Han.

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