Reporter is left with blood dripping down his face after being attacked by a magpie in a dive

Reporter Mark Santomartino (pictured) was waiting to do an interview at Hampton Park in Melbourne southeast on Wednesday morning when the angry bird attacked

A television reporter received an unpleasant reminder that spring is magpie season, since one of the birds in a park in Melbourne ran over him and received an unpleasant head injury.

Reporter Mark Santomartino was waiting to do an interview at Hampton Park in southeastern Melbourne on Wednesday morning when the protective bird attacked.

The journalist was in the park with his cameraman and had left to walk while he waited for the interview to begin, 9news.com.au reported.

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Reporter Mark Santomartino (pictured) was waiting to do an interview at Hampton Park in Melbourne southeast on Wednesday morning when the angry bird attacked

Reporter Mark Santomartino (pictured) was waiting to do an interview at Hampton Park in Melbourne southeast on Wednesday morning when the angry bird attacked

Mr. Santomartino was not aware that there was a magpie in a nearby tree and apparently got directly in his way.

"Out of nowhere, from my left side, they cut my head," he said.

All I remember seeing was a flash of black and white. I shuddered, but it put me right above my hair.

The Nine News reporter managed to evade the worst of the angry bird's attack but not before it drew blood.

"It did not bleed for the first two seconds, but then there was blood on my hands, in my suit," he said.

Mr. Santomartino, who admits to having been "terrified" of the birds since he was a child, said the attack was so "vicious" that he had to run back to the car in search of shelter.

He went on to say that despite being knocked down by the magpies in the past, he has never been beaten and this random attack was the worst.

Mr. Santomartino (left) managed to evade the attack of the angry bird (right) but not before blood came out of his face

After his terrifying experience with the bird, Mr. Santomartino went to social networks to share a picture of the bloody disaster he caused.

& # 39; Swooped. The last time I scheduled an interview in a park at 9NewsMelb, where was my magpie warning? the attached caption indicated.

Another publication published an ironic response message about the magpie's whereabouts after the incident.

After his terrible experience with the magpie, Mr. Santomartino (pictured) took the social networks to share a picture of the bloody disaster that caused

After his terrible experience with the magpie, Mr. Santomartino (pictured) took the social networks to share a picture of the bloody disaster that caused

After his terrible experience with the magpie, Mr. Santomartino (pictured) took the social networks to share a picture of the bloody disaster that caused

& # 39; We have located the attacker. Hide in a nearby nest. #swoopscoop, & # 39; the publication was read.

According to Magpie Alert!, Australia's social website to track aggressive attacks, if a bird attacks, keep calm to avoid provoking a new attack.

The website also claimed that wearing sunglasses and wide-brimmed hats would protect your head and eyes, and if you pounce while pedaling, get off the bike to avoid accidents.

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