Remnants of an entire herd of dinosaurs who died 100 million years ago are found in an opal mine

Fossilized remains of an entire herd of dinosaurs who died 100 million years ago can be found in an opal mine in Australia

  • The opal mine of the Australian outback has discovered a whole herd of dinosaurs
  • The remains of the 100 million-year-old dinosaurs were found in northern NSW
  • It has an Australian scoop and & # 39; the world's most complete opal-made dinosaur
  • The new dinosaur species is now called Fostoria dhimbangunmal

An opal mine from the Australian outback has made the incredible discovery of a whole herd of dinosaur fossils that belong to an entirely new herbivorous species.

The remains of a group of 100 million-year-old dinosaurs were found in the northwestern town of Lightning Ridge in New South Wales.

Synchronized as the first Australian, the herd was identified, as well as a new species, and & # 39; the world's most complete opal-made dinosaur.

The remains of an entire herd of 100 million-year-old dinosaurs were found in the northwestern New South Wales town of Lightning Ridge (pictured: a preserved opal-made Fostoria toe bone)

The remains of an entire herd of 100 million-year-old dinosaurs were found in the northwestern New South Wales town of Lightning Ridge (pictured: a preserved opal-made Fostoria toe bone)

The first was called Australian, the herd was identified, as well as a new species, and & # 39; the world's most complete opal-made dinosaur (depicted: artist & # 39; s impression of Fostoria dhimbangunmal, 100 million years ago)

The first was called Australian, the herd was identified, as well as a new species, and & # 39; the world's most complete opal-made dinosaur (depicted: artist & # 39; s impression of Fostoria dhimbangunmal, 100 million years ago)

The first was called Australian, the herd was identified, as well as a new species, and & # 39; the world's most complete opal-made dinosaur (depicted: artist & # 39; s impression of Fostoria dhimbangunmal, 100 million years ago)

The new dinosaur species, Fostoria dhimbangunmal, is named after opal miner Bob Foster.

Foster discovered the fossils more than 30 years ago at the Sheepyard Opal Field, which turned out to be a two-legged herbivore, meaning it stood on its hind legs and ate plants.

The fossils came from a group of dinosaurs called iguandontiants that is related to the dinosaur Muttaburrasaurus, found in Queensland.

The finds were announced in the US-based Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology and are believed to be the first herd ever discovered in Australia.

FOSTORIA DHIMBANGUNMAL

Fostoria dhimbangunmal is a herbivore for diving animals, which means that it stood on its hind legs and only ate plants.

Four different skeletons were excavated and varied from small juveniles to larger animals.

The largest animals are possible up to five meters long.

This led to speculation that the animals were part of a small herd or family.

Principal investigator and Australian scientist Dr. Phil Bell, of the University of New England at Armidale, said he was shocked by the amount of bones found in the opal mine.

& # 39; We initially thought it was a single skeleton, but when I went to look at some bones, I realized that we had four scapulae (shoulder blades) from all different animals, & # 39; said Dr. Bell.

& # 39; There are approximately 60 aluminized bones from an adult dinosaur, including part of the brain pan and bones from at least three other animals. & # 39;

Parts of four different Fostoria skeletons were found, ranging from small juveniles to animals thought to be five meters long.

Dozens of Fostoria bones, photographed at the Australian Museum after their discovery in the 1980s

Dozens of Fostoria bones, photographed at the Australian Museum after their discovery in the 1980s

Dozens of Fostoria bones, photographed at the Australian Museum after their discovery in the 1980s

Principal investigator and Australian scientist Dr. Phil Bell said he was shocked by the amount of bones found (pictured: part of a vertebra of the back of a Fostoria dinosaur)

Principal investigator and Australian scientist Dr. Phil Bell said he was shocked by the amount of bones found (pictured: part of a vertebra of the back of a Fostoria dinosaur)

Principal investigator and Australian scientist Dr. Phil Bell said he was shocked by the amount of bones found (pictured: part of a vertebra of the back of a Fostoria dinosaur)

While Mr. Foster found the bones in the 1980s, scientists from the Australian Museum in Sydney helped to excavate the fossils.

The bones remained untested until they were donated in 2015 to Robert & # 39; s children Gregory and Joanne Foster at the Australian Opal Center, under the Cultural Gift Program of the federal government.

Jenni Brammall, paleontologist and special project officer at the Australian Opal Center, said that Fostoria is the most complete dinosaur dinosaur skeleton in the world.

& # 39; Partial skeletons of extinct swimming reptiles have been found at other Australian opal fields, but for opal-made dinosaurs we usually have only one bone or tooth or, in rare cases, a few bones, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; It is a first to restore dozens of bones from one skeleton. & # 39;

Bob and Jenny Foster at the Australian Opal Center in 2018, with some of the dinosaur bones Bob discovered more than 30 years earlier

Bob and Jenny Foster at the Australian Opal Center in 2018, with some of the dinosaur bones Bob discovered more than 30 years earlier

Bob and Jenny Foster at the Australian Opal Center in 2018, with some of the dinosaur bones Bob discovered more than 30 years earlier

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