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Remains of 500 people executed by guillotine can be buried in walls of the Paris monument

Remains of 500 people executed by guillotine during the French Revolution can be buried in walls of the Paris monument

  • Bone fragments were discovered in the walls of the Chapelle Expiatoire, Paris
  • It is a listed monument dedicated to King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette
  • Archaeologist examined the walls and said that earth was mixed with bone fragments

The remains of up to 500 people executed by guillotine during the French Revolution can be buried in the walls of a Paris monument, according to the experts.

Bone fragments were discovered in the walls of the Chapelle Expiatoire, a listed monument in Paris.

Archaeologist Philippe Charlier examined the walls of the monument with a small camera pierced by the stones, The Guardian reported. He said that earth was mixed with bone fragments.

Researchers will examine the walls of the Chapelle Expiatoire, as experts believe that the remains of up to 500 people executed by guillotine in the French Revolution could be buried in the walls

Researchers will examine the walls of the Chapelle Expiatoire, as experts believe that the remains of up to 500 people executed by guillotine in the French Revolution could be buried in the walls

The memorial is dedicated to King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette who were executed on Place de la Révolution before being formally buried in the Basilica of St Denis.

The French authorities have engaged an archaeologist, who has inserted a camera through the stones into the walls, so that they have not damaged the foundation of the building.

The chapel manager, Aymeric Peniguet de Stoutz, had noticed anomalies in the walls between the columns of the lower chapel.

Archaeologist Charlier said the lower chapel had four ossuaries – chests or chests – made of wooden chests, which were filled with bones and probably stretched out with leather.

The monument is dedicated to King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. King Louis XVI was executed in Place de la Révolution in 1793 (photo)

The monument is dedicated to King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. King Louis XVI was executed in Place de la Révolution in 1793 (photo)

The monument is dedicated to King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. King Louis XVI was executed in Place de la Révolution in 1793 (photo)

The Chapelle Expiatoire is a chapel in the 8th arrondissement of Paris near the Grand Boulevards on the site of the old Madeleine cemetery

The Chapelle Expiatoire is a chapel in the 8th arrondissement of Paris near the Grand Boulevards on the site of the old Madeleine cemetery

The Chapelle Expiatoire is a chapel in the 8th arrondissement of Paris near the Grand Boulevards on the site of the old Madeleine cemetery

Peniguet de Stoutz has requested further investigation at the building.

Founded in 1816, the Chapelle Expiatoire is a chapel in the 8th arrondissement of Paris near the Grand Boulevards on the site of the old Madeleine cemetery.

The Madeleine cemetery was closed in 1794 when it allegedly ran out of space.

Historians believed that the remains of 500 victims buried in the cemetery were eventually transferred to catacombs under the city.

The monument was built not far from a place where the guillotine was widely used – the Place de la Révolution.

The French authorities have engaged an archaeologist, who put a camera through the stones in the walls, so that they did not damage the foundation of the building

The French authorities have engaged an archaeologist, who put a camera through the stones in the walls, so that they did not damage the foundation of the building

The French authorities have engaged an archaeologist, who put a camera through the stones in the walls, so that they did not damage the foundation of the building

King Louis XVI was executed on Place de la Révolution on January 21, 1793. Marie Antoinette, the last queen before the French Revolution, was also executed there.

Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette were buried in Madeleine’s cemetery before Louis XVIII buried their remains in the Basilica of St Denis when he became king in 1814.

Doctor and opponent of the death penalty Joseph-Ignace Guillotin said that the death penalty should always be beheading and that he wanted to introduce a humane way to carry out executions.

He proposed to the National Assembly on October 10, 1789 that this should be done through a simple mechanism.

The National Assembly began researching a new method of capital punishment in 1791 with the aim of ending life without causing unnecessary pain.

The guillotine was considered successful because it was considered a human form of execution.

The history of the guillotine in France

Joseph-Ignace Guillotin was an opponent of the death penalty and wanted to find a way to carry out humane executions

Joseph-Ignace Guillotin was an opponent of the death penalty and wanted to find a way to carry out humane executions

Joseph-Ignace Guillotin was an opponent of the death penalty and wanted to find a way to carry out humane executions

Doctor Joseph-Ignace Guillotin said the death penalty should always be beheading.

On October 10, 1789, he proposed to the National Assembly to do this through a simple mechanism.

Guillotin was an opponent of the death penalty and wanted to find a device to carry out human executions.

Unhappy with the usual horrific methods of execution, he wanted to convince King Louis XVI to implement a less painful alternative.

The National Assembly began in 1791 to investigate a new method of capital punishment that would end life without causing unnecessary pain.

The machine designed by the Assembly was considered successful because it was considered a human version.

The device consisted of two upright posts connected by a cross beam and grooved to guide the Britannica blade.

The back of the beveled knife was heavily weighted. This was designed to drop it forcefully onto a susceptible victim’s neck and cut through it.

Before the guillotine was invented, a sword or ax was used for members of the nobility. This meant that it often took two or three strokes to kill. Others were hanged.

The guillotine would become the only method of civilian execution, regardless of the class of convicts, which was also seen as an expression of equality.

It was the primary legal method of civilian execution until the death penalty was abolished in October 1981 after it was last applied in France in 1977.

The guillotine became the only civilian method of execution for both nobility and ordinary citizen, seen as an expression of equality

The guillotine became the only civilian method of execution for both nobility and ordinary citizen, seen as an expression of equality

The guillotine became the only civilian execution method for both nobility and ordinary citizen, seen as an expression of equality

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