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In the & # 39; Super Saturday & # 39; showdown today at the Lower House, Boris Johnson complained that maybe & # 39; meaningful & # 39; decision is more because of the Letwin amendment
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Boris Johnson raged today after his moment of triumph on a Brexit deal was dramatically torn away by a Remainer conspiracy.

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Despite hectic efforts, the Prime Minister was unable to reject an amendment from former Cabinet Minister Sir Oliver Letwin that would prevent his new package from being formally voted this afternoon.

Johnson is now confronted with the Benn Act to ask the EU for a Brexit extension tonight – but he provoked provocatively that he would not change his position.

& # 39; No delays and I will do everything to get Brexit ready on October 31 & # 39 ;, he raged.

& # 39; I will not negotiate a delay with the EU … nor does the law require that I do so. & # 39;

He said his deal is not dead and he is expected to propose implementation legislation and hold a new vote on Tuesday.

He swept: & # 39; The meaningful voice no longer has any meaning. & # 39;

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But Jeremy Corbyn demanded that the prime minister & # 39; abide by the law & # 39; and asked the EU for an extension.

Government whips had admitted that they were not hopeful to defeat the Letwin amendment – which, according to him, is only meant to avert the threat of No Deal. & # 39; Unfortunately many people seem to have been put forward by his arguments & # 39 ;, someone said to MailOnline.

Johnson has held last-ditch meetings with the DUP, who have accused him of treason for concluding a deal that undermines the union while begging them to come to the rescue. According to sources, the overtures did not go well. & # 39; They are not in a positive place, & # 39; they said sorry.

Johnson previously started the & # 39; Super Saturday & # 39; showdown at the Lower House and complained that there were no & # 39; meaningful & # 39; decision could be made.

He said it & # 39; urgently & # 39; was for the country to get past the impasse and unite & # 39 ;, saying that its deal & # 39; can heal the gap in British politics & # 39 ;. & # 39; Now it is time for this great House of Commons to come together today and bring the country together, & # 39; he insisted.

Letwin plan begs PM for Brexit delay and starts ANOTHER dealdowndown next week

Former cabinet minister Sir Oliver Letwin has tabled an amendment to prevent the Brexit deal from being formally voted on this afternoon.

If adopted, it will withhold approval of the plan until the legislation is included in the statute book.

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Johnson is forced by a separate Remainer law – the Benn law – to plead with the EU tonight for a Brexit extension after Halloween.

It is unclear whether European leaders will accept the request immediately, and Mr. Johnson insists that he can still meet his & # 39; do or die & # 39; date of October 31.

The big confrontation with the deal is likely to take place on Tuesday in a vote in second reading on implementation legislation.

Johnson warned that & # 39; the options for fruitful negotiations have gone well & # 39 ;. & # 39; It is now my judgment that we have found the best possible solution, & # 39; he said.

Sources have shown that Mr. Johnson had crisis talks with Sir Oliver on Downing Street last night, trying to end the crisis, but without success.

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Ironically, the roadblock arose just when the prime minister seemed to be on the verge of a breakthrough.

He was stimulated by the support of Tory & # 39; Spartan & # 39; Mark Francois and former cabinet minister Iain Duncan Smith, and Steve Baker, head of the Eurosceptic ERG block, today urged his colleagues to join the queue.

There is increasing speculation that at least a dozen Labor MPs would support the package that is being dramatically struck with Brussels this week.

That would compensate for the furious opposition of his former DUP allies and Jeremy Corbyn and put the prime minister on the threshold of a historic triumph that could define the country for a generation.

Despite polls showing that the public is tired for three years of bitter quarrel after the referendum, an extraordinary piece of parliamentary deception can still give the prime minister the & # 39; clean & # 39; take away the voice he craves.

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Sir Oliver – who served in the cabinet under David Cameron – has tabled an amendment that would effectively refuse approval of the deal until after the detailed implementing legislation has been adopted.

Speaker John Bercow confirmed this morning that he had chosen the change for debate, and it could be adopted with the support of Labor and Lib Dem Remainers, many of whom still want a referendum to completely cancel the Brexit.

The fact that the Letwin amendment does not completely kill the deal – and the government's lack of majority – means that many MPs will support the amendment instead of giving the prime minister his moment of truth.

Labor MP Gareth Snell, who is generally expected to support the deal when it comes to a vote, told the Commons that he would support the Letwin movement.

However, it was angrily condemned by a series of other MPs including Caroline Flint from Labor, who called it a & # 39; panic measure & # 39; called. She said the plot showed that the & # 39; sponsors of the Benn Act had only one intention – to postpone and stop Brexit & # 39 ;.

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In the & # 39; Super Saturday & # 39; showdown today at the Lower House, Boris Johnson complained that maybe & # 39; meaningful & # 39; decision is more because of the Letwin amendment

In the & # 39; Super Saturday & # 39; showdown today at the Lower House, Boris Johnson complained that maybe & # 39; meaningful & # 39; decision is more because of the Letwin amendment

In the Commons this afternoon, Theresa May warned that the & # 39; eyes of the world are focused on us, while encouraging colleagues & # 39; s to step behind the new Boris Johnson package

Oliver Letwin in the Commons today

Oliver Letwin in the Commons today

Former Chancellor Ken Clarke

Former Chancellor Ken Clarke

Oliver Letwin (photo left in the Commons today) has tabled the extraordinary amendment that would later block the prime minister's crunch vote. Former Chancellor Ken Clarke (right) said he will support the deal if the legislation comes before Parliament

The lower house was absolutely packed for the dramatic debate about the Prime Minister's deal today

The lower house was absolutely packed for the dramatic debate about the Prime Minister's deal today

The lower house was absolutely packed for the dramatic debate about the Prime Minister's deal today

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In another day of dramatic play with high stakes in the Houses of Parliament while the Brexit saga reached a peak:

  • Furious Tories suggested that Sir Oliver put him & # 39; too smart for half & # 39; and accused him of making the first Saturday session since the Falklands War & # 39; meaningless & # 39 ;;
  • Johnson implored the MPs to get & # 39; Brexit done & # 39; and said that the public was sick of the situation that overshadowed their priorities on the NHS and law and order;
  • The heads of the Eurosceptic ERG bloc urged his MPs to support the prime minister in a major impetus to the prospects for the deal. David Trimble, an architect of the Good Friday Agreement, has approved it;
  • The DUP expressed anger, with deputy leader Nigel Dodds confronting Mr. Johnson with & # 39; fatigue & # 39; about Brexit, & # 39; is no excuse for weakness on Brexit and weakness on the union & # 39 ;;
  • Former Chancellor Philip Hammond suggested that he support the Letwin amendment and oppose the deal because at the end of the transition period he would not be misled into a & # 39; camouflaged no-deal & # 39; to support;
  • Remnants continued to insist on a second referendum with Tony Blair and urged MPs to & # 39; be patient & # 39; to oppose the deal so that a public vote should take place again;
  • European leaders watched closely after Emmanuel Macron and Leo Varadkar warned that there was no guarantee that they would grant an extension request – suggesting that MPs should choose between this deal and No Deal;
  • Johnson has held an olive branch for Labor MPs by granting an automatic voting right on whether or not to approve future EU legislation on workers' rights;

If Johnson fails to fend off the challenge, the rebel Benn Act dictates that he must plead with the EU for tonight's extension – his & # 39; do or die & # 39; break the promise to get the UK out of the bloc by October 31.

During his statement to Members of Parliament this morning, Johnson seemed to accept that he would send a letter asking for a delay. & # 39; Whatever letters they want to use to force the government to write, it cannot change my opinion that further delay is meaningless, expensive, and deeply corrosive to public confidence, & # 39; he said.

What happens next in the Brexit?

TONIGHT: What happens tonight if the Letwin amendment is approved by MPs?

The prime minister must abide by the Benn law and send a letter to the EU tonight requesting a Brexit delay.

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He would then probably submit the bill withdrawal proposal – the legislation needed to actually allow Brexit to take place – on Monday this week to make it break through parliament as soon as possible.

THIS WEEK: What happens to the Boris Johnson deal?

The prime minister's deal will still be alive and he could deliver Brexit by October 31, but he will first have to put his agreement into law.

The amendment would refuse support for the Prime Minister's deal until the government has submitted and adopted the proposal for the withdrawal agreement.

By not reaching a conclusion of the Brexit deal today, the provisions in the Benn Act would be activated and the prime minister would have to ask the EU to reduce the current departure date.

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The amendment would make the & # 39; meaningful vote & # 39; postpone the agreement until the government has received its withdrawal agreement through parliament.

THIS MONTH: Can the EU refuse to grant a deferment?

Yes. Emmanuel Macron and Leo Varadkar have both suggested that they are against further delays, but Angela Merkel reportedly said an extension would be inevitable if the deal was rejected.

It is possible that the EU would decide to reduce its losses because the Brexit stalemate has been going on for too long.

In his statement to MEPs when the debate began this morning, Mr. Johnson said that the Brexit issue should no longer consume Westminster & # 39 ;.

& # 39; I really hope that when we come together for a meaningful vote tonight we can indeed have a meaningful vote & he said.

& # 39; Parliament need not be reminded that this is the second deal and the fourth vote, three and a half years after the nation voted for the Brexit.

& # 39; And in those years, friendships have been tense, families have been divided and this House's attention has been devoured by a single issue that was sometimes unable to resolve.

& # 39; But I hope this is the moment when we can finally reach that resolution and reconcile the instincts that compete in us. & # 39;

Johnson said that the agreement & # 39; provides for a genuine Brexit & # 39 ;, adding: & # 39; Taking back control of our borders, laws, money, agriculture, fishing and trade – representing the greatest recovery of the national sovereignty in parliamentary history.

& # 39; It removes the backstop, which would have held us against our will in the customs union and much of the internal market.

& # 39; For the first time in nearly five decades, the UK will be able to conclude free trade agreements with our friends around the world. & # 39;

Johnson endorsed DUP's concern that Great Britain had released Northern Ireland into the deal, and told MPs: "Above all, we and our European friends have retained the letter and spirit of the Belfast / Good Friday agreement and the old areas of cooperation between the UK and Ireland, including the common travel area. & # 39;

A shout from & # 39; it's a sold out & # 39; was heard from an MP on the opposition banks while Mr. Johnson spoke.

But Mr Corbyn made it clear that Labor will support the Letwin amendment and oppose the deal.

& # 39; Labor is unwilling to sell out the communities we represent, & # 39; he raged.

& # 39; We are not willing to sell out their future and we will not support this sold-out deal. & # 39; This is about our communities now and about our future generations. & # 39;

During the debate, Theresa May launched a vicious tirade with Remainer MPs who presented a & # 39; con trick & # 39; to reverse the referendum result today when she supported the Boris Johnson deal.

The former prime minister warned that the & # 39; eyes of the world were on us & # 39; while encouraging colleagues to sit behind the new package that was thrown away with Brussels.

She demanded MPs who intend to oppose the deal & # 39; put the national interest first & # 39; and honor the will of the public.

& # 39; Do we want to deliver Brexit? & # 39; she stormed. & # 39; Did we really mean it when we voted to activate Article 50? & # 39;

Earlier, the 10 MPs from the DUP underlined their opposition to the deal and said it would undermine the union. Vice leader Nigel Dodds told the Today program of BBC Radio 4: & We will not support the government, we will vote against it.

& # 39; Because it is not Brexit for the entire United Kingdom. & # 39;

The prime minister has focused his efforts on Tory Eurosceptics, 21 former Tory rebels and up to 30 & # 39; realists & # 39; of Labor who have proposed to support the proposals. Thus & # 39; n 28 conservative & # 39; Spartans & # 39; didn't vote for the Theresa May deal one of the three times it was brought, but Mr. Johnson looks forward to getting support from almost everyone.

With about a dozen Labor MPs who seem to be threatening to defy selection and support the deal, the majority of 21 former Tory rebels living around, and a handful of independents, the government is on the threshold of the 320 winning line .

The man behind the plot to sabotage Boris Johnson's Brexit plan

Sir Oliver Letwin is a thorn in the government's eye about the Brexit.

His amendment, which MPs are expected to vote this afternoon, would force Boris Johnson to ask the EU to postpone the UK's departure after October 31.

It would also deprive the Prime Minister of the opportunity to test the will of the House of Commons to see if a majority of MPs support his Brexit deal.

Sir Oliver has insisted that the relocation is only about strengthening protection against an EU No Deal split.

It would require the government to approve all legislation needed to implement Brexit before the MPs finally agree to the terms of the agreement.

But his critics believe that it is nothing less than a scrapping amendment designed to prevent the UK from leaving the EU.

This is hardly the first time the former senior cabinet minister has been involved in efforts that have frustrated the government's Brexit proposals.

He is one of the leading Brexit rebels among lagging MPs because they have tried and succeeded in excluding a No Deal Brexit.

His name was at the top of a motion that was passed in early September, allowing MPs to take control of the Commons and then adopt the Benn Act, the anti-No Deal law that will force the prime minister to ask the EU to postpone if there is tonight no agreement concluded.

Sir Oliver was loyal to Theresa May's original Brexit deal, since he was behind all three when it was put to the vote.

But the prospect of a No Deal Brexit led him to play a central role in bringing forward the indicative voting process earlier this year, when MPs tried and failed to reach an agreement on a Brexit option that could support a majority in the Commons.

His rebellion against the opposition to No Deal peaked last month when he was one of the 21 MPs who had been robbed of the Tory whip after support for an attempt to block a disorderly split of the EU.

He is an unlikely rebel in many ways.

Trained at Eton and then Cambridge, the 63-year-old first went into politics as a member of Margaret Thatcher's policy unit in number 10 in the 1980s.

He was then first elected as the Tory MP for West Dorset in 1997 before he made a rapid advance to the front bench of the opposition and eventually became shadow chancellor in 2003.

He became a key figure in David Cameron's administration, who acted as the & # 39; fixer & # 39; from the Prime Minister, after he helped prepare the 2010 election manifesto.

After being a constant in Mr Cameron's governments, Theresa May was subsequently driven from the front by Sir Oliver when she became prime minister in 2016.

Sir Oliver is considered a & # 39; big brain & # 39; in Whitehall circles and is seen as a man with a gift for creative thinking and problem solving.

But he has built up a reputation over the years as an unfortunate politician who has been sensitive to blunders and is in embarrassing situations.

He once unknowingly welcomed two burglars to his London home after they said they wanted to use the bathroom.

He was also once seen as he threw parliamentary newspapers in a trash can in St James & # 39; s Park.

Before the 2001 elections, he and his local challengers dressed in gowns for a debate.

In 2015, after apologizing for the fact that he had & # 39; poor moral attitudes & # 39; in black inner-city communities had blamed riots in the 1980s in an article he had helped write.

Outside of politics, Sir Oliver is married and has two children.

He is expected to resign as a member of parliament at the next elections.

Francois told his Rayleigh association last night that he would support the deal. Another & # 39; Spartan & # 39; Anne-Marie Morris has also said that she will vote in favor.

Another hardliner from Tory, Peter Bone, said he still had to decide, but was planning to stand in line. & # 39; I will vote for its deal if it is made clear today in the Commons that we will be leaving the transition period on December 31, 2020 and not later, & # 39; said Mr. Bone.

Mr. Duncan Smith urged his colleagues to support the deal and swept that Sir Oliver should & # 39;

& # 39; I beg my colleague & # 39; s … we must vote on the Letwin amendment & # 39 ;, he told the BBC. & # 39; This mood must be clear to our partners in Europe and make it clear to the country that we are now on the way to leave with this deal.

& # 39; I just wanted Oliver Letwin to put it away now. & # 39; He added: & # 39; I beg my colleague & # 39; s, it is now for the country, we must get this over the line. & # 39;

Senior backbencher Damian Collins tweeted: & # 39; The Letwin amendment is another of those Brexit ideas that is too smart for half. If it succeeds, it effectively makes the Saturday session of the parliament meaningless at a time when the country and the EU need to know whether or not the parliament will accept the new withdrawal agreement. & # 39;

A government source said about the Letwin amendment: & # 39; If it continues, it is an act of sabotage dressed as reasonableness. MPs are still trying to postpone the decision moment. & # 39;

Sir Oliver insisted that he was in favor of the Prime Minister's plans and that it was only intended as an insurance policy to ensure that the UK did not leave the EU without a deal on 31 October.

But a source from the government said: & # 39; The amendment is not about conditional approval – it explicitly means approval. The vast majority of signatories do not intend to ever vote for a deal and have never done so. They want an extension and a chance for a second referendum. & # 39;

ERG Chairman Steve Baker tweeted the group's advice to MPs after a meeting this morning: & # 39; 1. Vote for the Boris deal in the national interest.

& # 39; 2. Support legislation in good faith, provided that it is not spoiled by opponents of Brexit.

& # 39; 3. Vote everywhere with Boris to give him maximum opportunity to deliver for our country. & # 39;

However, former Tory Antoinette Sandbach confirmed that she will not join the government in the divisional lobbies and says the package is worse than Mrs. May's plan.

Hammond said he wasn't & # 39; duped & # 39; would be to support something that could lead to a & # 39; heavily camouflaged no-deal & # 39; departure.

The former prime minister said the prime minister skeptics like he had to reassure & # 39; that the withdrawal agreement would not result in the UK crashing out of the EU next year because the backstop had been removed.

It came after Tory MP John Baron claimed yesterday that he was assured by No. 10 that the deal would allow the UK to break ties with the EU if it failed to conclude a trade agreement.

Writing in the Times Hammond said: & # 39; My former colleague, John Baron MP, gave the game away: they are told that as soon as we are gone, the UK will make a take-it-or-leave-it proposal for a minimal ambition, & # 39; Canada-minus & # 39; trade deal under the terms of the UK and if the EU rejects it, the UK will leave at the end of 2020 without a trade deal.

& # 39; I have not come that far to avoid a deal in 2019 to be cheated on to vote for a heavily camouflaged no-deal by the end of 2020. But I am not a lost cause! & # 39;

In the meantime, Remainers have stepped up their efforts to thwart a solution to the Brexit impasse and to force a referendum.

Former Prime Minister Tony Blair said to the Today program: & # 39; If this deal were submitted to the British Parliament a year ago or two years ago, it would definitely not be the case.

DUP vice leader Nigel Dodds said that & # 39; fatigue & # 39; of Brexit & # 39; is no excuse for weakness of Brexit and weakness of the union & # 39;

DUP vice leader Nigel Dodds said that & # 39; fatigue & # 39; of Brexit & # 39; is no excuse for weakness of Brexit and weakness of the union & # 39;

Jeremy Corbyn (shown today in the Commons) made it clear that Labor will support the Letwin amendment and oppose the Prime Minister's deal

Jeremy Corbyn (shown today in the Commons) made it clear that Labor will support the Letwin amendment and oppose the Prime Minister's deal

DUP vice leader Nigel Dodds (left) said that & # 39; fatigue & # 39; of Brexit & # 39; is no excuse for weakness of Brexit and weakness of the union & # 39 ;. Jeremy Corbyn (pictured on the right in the Commons) made it clear that Labor will support the Letwin amendment and oppose the Prime Minister's deal

Maverick No10 strategist Dominic Cummings was on Downing Street today when the Brexit drama took place in Westminster

Maverick No10 strategist Dominic Cummings was on Downing Street today when the Brexit drama took place in Westminster

Maverick No10 strategist Dominic Cummings was on Downing Street today when the Brexit drama took place in Westminster

Hilary Benn

Hilary Benn

Jo Johnson

Jo Johnson

Hillary Benn (who left Westminster today) gave his name to legislation that could force the prime minister to beg a Brexit extension if his deal is not accepted today. Boris Johnson's brother, Jo (right), left the government last month and it is not clear whether he will support the deal

Boris Johnson (photo leaving Downing Street today) sees his triumphant moment being thrown away by an & # 39; act of sabotage & # 39; despite the fact that he is a short distance away from getting a majority for his deal

Boris Johnson (photo leaving Downing Street today) sees his triumphant moment being thrown away by an & # 39; act of sabotage & # 39; despite the fact that he is a short distance away from getting a majority for his deal

Boris Johnson (photo leaving Downing Street today) sees his triumphant moment being thrown away by an & # 39; act of sabotage & # 39; despite the fact that he is a short distance away from getting a majority for his deal

The survey showed that support for the Tories had increased enormously after the Prime Minister's breakthrough at this week's EU summit. They are now at 32 percent, five points higher than three weeks ago. Optimism grew last night in No. 10 that MPs will support the agreement. A source said, "It's incredibly close, but it's doable."

The survey showed that support for the Tories had increased enormously after the Prime Minister's breakthrough at this week's EU summit. They are now at 32 percent, five points higher than three weeks ago. Optimism grew last night in No. 10 that MPs will support the agreement. A source said, "It's incredibly close, but it's doable."

The survey showed that support for the Tories had increased enormously after the Prime Minister's breakthrough at this week's EU summit. They are now at 32 percent, five points higher than three weeks ago. Optimism grew last night in No. 10 that MPs will support the agreement. A source said: & # 39; It's incredibly close, but it's feasible & # 39;

& # 39; The only reason the government can try to make it succeed now is honestly … people are completely fed up with the Brexit. They want it over. They want it done. & # 39;

The voters threw their weight behind Mr. Johnson's Brexit deal last night.

On the eve of today's dramatic Commons vote on his withdrawal plan, 50 percent said MPs should support it.

Former Chancellor Philip Hammond explodes Boris Johnson's Brexit deal and says he is not & # 39; duped & # 39; is to vote for a & # 39; heavily camouflaged no-deal & # 39; departure

Former Tory Chancellor Philip Hammond tore into Boris Johnson's Brexit deal today and said he would not be & # 39; duped & # 39; to support something that could lead to a & # 39; heavily camouflaged no deal & # 39; departure.

The former prime minister said the prime minister skeptics like he had to reassure & # 39; that the withdrawal agreement would not result in the UK crashing out of the EU next year because the backstop had been removed.

It came after Tory MP John Baron claimed yesterday that he was assured by No. 10 that the deal would allow the UK to break ties with the EU if it failed to conclude a trade agreement.

His intervention came when MPs gathered today for a historic Commons to vote on Mr. Johnson's deal.

Mr Hammond's colleague Remainer ex-Tory Antoinette Sandbach indicated that she would also vote against the deal.

Writing in the Times Hammond said: & # 39; My former colleague, John Baron MP, gave the game away: they are told that as soon as we are gone, the UK will make a take-it-or-leave-it proposal for a minimal ambition, & # 39; Canada-minus & # 39; trade deal under the terms of the UK and if the EU rejects it, the UK will leave at the end of 2020 without a trade deal.

& # 39; I have not come that far to avoid a deal in 2019 to be cheated on to vote for a heavily camouflaged no-deal by the end of 2020. But I am not a lost cause! & # 39;

The Survival survey for the Daily Mail showed that 38 percent were against the deal, with 12 percent undecided.

The survey showed that support for the Tories had increased enormously after the Prime Minister's breakthrough at this week's EU summit. They are now at 32 percent, five points higher than three weeks ago. Optimism grew last night in No. 10 that MPs will support the agreement. A source said: & # 39; It's incredibly close, but it's feasible. & # 39;

However, the situation became even more tense when Sir Oliver submitted a plan to force Johnson to seek a new delay for Brexit.

Today's poll shows that a total of 47 percent of people say they support the Prime Minister's Brexit deal, while 38 percent say they are against it.

Voters also had no doubts about who first blinked in EU talks – with 52 percent saying the UK gave the most land. Only 20 percent think that Brussels was deteriorating. A total of 47 percent think Mr. Johnson's plan should go to a referendum, compared to 44 against the idea.

When voters are given a direct choice between the prime minister's deal and stay in the EU, there is a dead heat, with both parties winning 50 percent.

Remarkably, 29 percent of Labor voters say they would support the Johnson deal in such a referendum; 71 percent said they would not support his deal.

But a different picture emerges when voters, as the Brexitees claim, get a third option to leave with No Deal.

Remain receives the most support, 45 percent, based on initial preferences – although no option achieves the winning line of 50 percent. Uit de peiling bleek dat de meeste extra steun voor de Tories ten koste ging van de Brexit-partij van Nigel Farage, wiens steun met 3 procent is afgenomen.

De resultaten van het onderzoek hopen meer vernedering op de belegerde heer Corbyn. Eén op de vijf van zijn eigen Labour-kiezers zou liever Johnson in Downing Street zien. Miljoenen aanhangers van Labour hebben zijn kansen afgeschreven om ooit de macht te grijpen.

Gevraagd naar wie ze dachten dat de volgende verkiezingen zouden winnen, denkt slechts 31 procent van de Labour-stemmers dat de heer Corbyn: precies hetzelfde aantal, 31 procent, zegt dat de heer Johnson hem zal verslaan.

Als Johnson zijn belofte nakomt om de EU uiterlijk op 31 oktober te verlaten, kan hij een verdere toename van zijn ratings verwachten. In totaal zegt 33 procent dat ze eerder conservatief zullen stemmen; 23 procent zegt dat ze dit minder snel zullen doen.

Voormalig Labour-parlementslid Frank Field zal naar verwachting de deal steunen in een stemming

Voormalig Labour-parlementslid Frank Field zal naar verwachting de deal steunen in een stemming

Verander de Britse leider Anna Soubry, een voormalige Tory-minister, zal tegen de deal zijn

Verander de Britse leider Anna Soubry, een voormalige Tory-minister, zal tegen de deal zijn

Voormalig Labour-parlementslid Frank Field (links) zal naar verwachting de deal steunen in een stemming. Verander de Britse leider Anna Soubry, een voormalige Tory-minister, zal tegen de deal zijn

Bovendien, als parlementsleden zijn voorstel vandaag weggooien, zullen de kiezers hem niet beschuldigen.

Hoe zal het drama zich ontvouwen in het Lagerhuis

Wat gebeurt er op Super zaterdag?

Het Lagerhuis zit meestal van maandag tot donderdag, en af ​​en toe vrijdag.

Maar vandaag is er een buitengewone zitting van het Parlement – de eerste in een weekend sinds april 1982 – om de nieuwe Brexit-deal van Boris Johnson te bespreken.

Na een lang debat beginnen de parlementsleden om ongeveer 14.30 uur met stemmen.

Eerst zal er een verdeeldheid zijn over het Letwin-amendement, en als dat wordt aangenomen, zal het de motie van de regering effectief castreren – de heer Johnson van goedkeuring voor zijn deal beroven.

Wat zijn de volgende stappen als de deal wordt goedgekeurd of het Letwin-amendement wordt aangenomen?

Een eenvoudige stemming over de deal lijkt onwaarschijnlijk, omdat er brede steun is voor het Letwin-amendement.

Als de overeenkomst door de Commons zou worden goedgekeurd, hoeft Johnson geen verlenging van de EU te vragen.

Maar hoe dan ook, de regering zal volgende week de wetten naar voren brengen die nodig zijn om het vertrek van het VK uit de EU te bepalen.

Als de wetgeving met succes wordt doorgevoerd, zal er aan het einde van het proces een 'zinvolle' stem worden uitgebracht om het proces te voltooien.

Johnson hoopt dat dat nog steeds kan gebeuren tegen 31 oktober, zodat het land de EU op schema verlaat.

In totaal zegt 42 procent dat ze het Parlement verantwoordelijk zullen houden voor de vertraging – twee keer het aantal, 21 procent, die zegt dat Johnson alleen de schuld heeft voor de nederlaag.

Meer dan een op de twee (52 procent) zegt dat de nieuwe deal 'het referendum 2016 respecteert' in vergelijking met minder dan een op de drie (30 procent) die zegt dat dit niet het geval is.

Gevraagd naar wie het beste Brexit-beleid heeft, loopt de heer Johnson ver voor op alle belangrijke partijleiders; Corbyn loopt als laatste achter Mr Farage op de tweede plaats, gevolgd door SNP-leider Nicola Sturgeon en Lib Dem-leider Jo Swinson.

De kloof tussen de heer Johnson en de respectieve persoonlijke status van de heer Corbyn wordt geïllustreerd door hun beoordelingen van 'charisma'.

Hier scoort de premier plus 16 vergeleken met min 59 van de heer Corbyn.

Voor 'intelligentie' is de heer Johnson plus 36 vergeleken met de min zeven van de oppositieleider.

In totaal 41 procent verzet zich tegen de beslissing van de DUP van Noord-Ierland om de heer Johnson vandaag te trotseren; gezien als het belangrijkste obstakel voor hem om te slagen; 28 procent zegt dat de DUP terecht tegen hem is.

Gisteravond zei de heer Johnson dat de confrontatie in het Lagerhuis een 'zeer groot moment voor ons land' used to be.

Hij zei: 'Ik denk dat het voor ons een kans zou zijn om als land samen te komen en verder te gaan en ons te concentreren op dingen die er echt toe doen voor mensen. Ik denk dat de zucht van opluchting die niet alleen in Groot-Brittannië, maar over de hele wereld zou uitgaan, heel, heel groot en gepassioneerd zou zijn. & # 39;

The Prime Minister also insisted his deal was the best divorce agreement possible.

Survation interviewed 1,025 adults online on Thursday afternoon and Friday.

'Christmas at Chequers is cancelled': The Prime Minister's Remain-backing sister Rachel Johnson jokes about her arguments with Boris Johnson on Have I Got News For You

Rachel Johnson admitted that being the Prime Minister's sister meant 'a world of pain' in her appearance on the BBC's Have I Got News For You.

The avid Remainer, who has been critical of the UK's decision to leave the EU, quickly objected to being introduced as the sibling to Boris Johnson.

Ms Johnson said on the BBC show: 'I like the way you introduce me as Boris Johnson's sister as if that is actually my day job.'

She joked with panelists that being the Prime Minister's sister meant a 'world of pain'.

Host Victoria Coren Mitchell later asked Ms Johnson: 'Does Boris ever phone you up and say 'oh don't say that it's really embarrassing'

Host Victoria Coren Mitchell later asked Ms Johnson: 'Does Boris ever phone you up and say 'oh don't say that it's really embarrassing'

Host Victoria Coren Mitchell later asked Ms Johnson: 'Does Boris ever phone you up and say 'oh don't say that it's really embarrassing'

The broadcaster and journalist - who appeared on the popular programme with Paul Merton, Ross Noble, and Ian Hislop - quickly retorted: 'Yup'

The broadcaster and journalist - who appeared on the popular programme with Paul Merton, Ross Noble, and Ian Hislop - quickly retorted: 'Yup'

The broadcaster and journalist – who appeared on the popular programme with Paul Merton, Ross Noble, and Ian Hislop – quickly retorted: 'Yup'

Host Victoria Coren Mitchell later asked Ms Johnson: 'Does Boris ever phone you up and say 'oh don't say that it's really embarrassing.'

The broadcaster and journalist – who appeared on the popular programme with Paul Merton, Ross Noble, and Ian Hislop – quickly retorted: 'Yup'.

She added that after she made the comment about No Deal Brexit only benefiting currency speculators that 'it meant Christmas Chequers was canceled.'

Ross Noble joked she could retort to her brother that 'everything you do is embarassing, goodbye.'

She then added 'No, I'm under orders to not do any chat shows, not to say anything about the Prime Minister, this is my safe space' to raucous laughter from the audience.

In regular feature of the show, part of the show panelists were given a headline to complete that started 'Queen set to earn £100 million from (blank space).'

Ms Johnson said: 'I know, suing the Prime Minister for illegal prorogation.'

Ms Johnson appeared on the popular BBC comedy news show on the same team as celebrated comedian Paul Merton

Ms Johnson appeared on the popular BBC comedy news show on the same team as celebrated comedian Paul Merton

Ms Johnson appeared on the popular BBC comedy news show on the same team as celebrated comedian Paul Merton

Then she puts her hands to her face and exclaims: 'Cut that bit! Christmas at Chequers is cancelled.'

Mr Merton then retorts: 'Well he may not be at Chequers at Christmas, you don't know.'

Boris Johnson's sister quickly responds: 'I hope he is.'

In a previous appearance on Sky News last month, Ms Johnson attacked her brother's attempt to force through Brexit.

She said:  'I think that what we are seeing is an executive that is so keen to deliver Brexit in any shape or form, to get the country out of the EU, to deliver up on that promised land, that they will do anything to justify that end'

Asked what could be behind the strategy, she said: 'It could be (senior aide) Dominic Cummings advising the Prime Minister to be extremely aggressive and to face down opposition from all sides of the establishment in order to secure his position as the tribune of the people.

'It could be coming from my brother himself, he obviously thoroughly enjoys being Prime Minister.

'It also could be from – who knows – people who have invested billions in shorting the pound or shorting the country in the expectation of a no-deal Brexit. We don't know.'

Ms Johnson is not the only family member to turn against the PM after his younger brother Jo revealed he was quitting as a minister and would stand down as the MP for Orpington at the next election.

He said there had been an 'unresolvable tension' between 'family loyalty and the national interest'.

What happens if Sir Oliver Letwin's amendment is agreed by MPs? Boris Johnson would be forced to ask the EU for a divorce delay, face a race against time to pass a key Brexit law and have to wait to hold a final vote on his deal

MPs are likely to support a rebel amendment this afternoon which will scupper Boris Johnson's Brexit plan.

The Prime Minister wants MPs to formally back his deal today but a proposal put forward by Sir Oliver Letwin is expected to ruin the premier's hopes of making Brexit progress.

The amendment has cross-party backing and will ultimately force the PM to ask the EU for a Brexit delay under the terms of the anti-No Deal law known as the Benn Act.

If it is agreed, the amendment does not kill off Mr Johnson's deal and it would still be possible for him to deliver Brexit by October 31.

But the path to fulfilling his 'do or die' Halloween pledge will be fraught with difficulty and the chances of a Brexit delay will increase exponentially.

Here is a breakdown of what is likely to happen if the amendment is passed by MPs.

What does the Letwin amendment do?

It would withhold support for the PM's deal until such a time as the government has brought forward and passed the legislation needed to actually make an orderly Brexit happen.

By failing to agree to a Brexit deal by close of play today, the provisions outlined in the Benn Act would be triggered and the PM would have to ask the EU to push back the current departure date.

The amendment would effectively postpone the 'meaningful vote' on the accord until the government has got its Withdrawal Agreement Bill through Parliament.

Boris Johnson, pictured in the House of Commons today, is urging MPs to formally back his proposed Brexit deal

Boris Johnson, pictured in the House of Commons today, is urging MPs to formally back his proposed Brexit deal

Boris Johnson, pictured in the House of Commons today, is urging MPs to formally back his proposed Brexit deal

But the PM's hopes of making Brexit progress could be scuppered by an amendment put forward by Sir Oliver Lewtin which has cross-party support

But the PM's hopes of making Brexit progress could be scuppered by an amendment put forward by Sir Oliver Lewtin which has cross-party support

But the PM's hopes of making Brexit progress could be scuppered by an amendment put forward by Sir Oliver Lewtin which has cross-party support

The thinking is that by withholding support for the deal until key Brexit legislation is in place, MPs will further protect against the possibility of the UK leaving the EU without a deal on October 31.

Some Remainers are suspicious that if MPs back the PM's deal today and there is no extension, Brexiteers who want a No Deal split could then scupper the passage of the laws needed to deliver an orderly exit, causing a bad break on Halloween.

What will happen if the amendment does pass?

The PM will have to comply with the Benn Act and send a letter to the EU asking for a Brexit delay.

He would then likely bring forward the Withdrawal Agreement Bill on Monday this week to try to crash it through Parliament as quickly as possible.

If he was able to get MPs and peers to agree to the draft legislation in the coming days he would then be able to hold the 'meaningful vote' on his deal, paving the way for the UK to leave the EU on time.

How likely is it that MPs and peers will agree to the Withdrawal Agreement Bill?

The Letwin amendment will effectively rob the PM of the chance to test whether there is a majority for his deal.

That means that nobody will know for certain whether there is a majority in favour of the so-called WAB.

Even if there is a majority it is likely to be a slim one which will make the passage of the legislation incredibly difficult as rebel MPs potentially try to amend and change it.

Draft laws have been rushed through parliament in quick time before but whether something as divisive as the legislation to deliver Brexit could be dealt with equally as swiftly is unclear.

What happens if the PM is able to get the Brexit law agreed and win a 'meaningful vote' before October 31?

The UK could still leave the EU on the current timetable but the closer we get to Halloween the tougher that becomes and the chances of a delay increase.

If the PM can get the deal signed off by MPs by the end of the coming week – a big if – his 'do or die' pledge could still be stuck to.

But anything beyond that and time will get extremely tight because once MPs have agreed the deal it still has to go through the European Parliament.

What is the EU likely to do?

If the amendment is agreed and the PM sends the Brexit delay letter the EU will have to decide whether to offer an extension.

The most likely scenario is that the bloc will keep its powder dry and not formally respond until it has seen whether the PM can win a vote in the Commons this coming week on the Withdrawal Agreement Bill.

If he can, then Brussels will probably hold fire on offering an extension on the grounds that the UK could still agree to a deal and leave on time.

If he cannot win a vote on the WAB this week and his deal looks dead then the bloc will face more pressure to make a final decision on any delay.

It is thought in such circumstances the bloc would offer a postponement in order to stop a No Deal Brexit.

That would pave the way for a general election potentially being held before the end of the year.

Could there be an emergency EU summit?

If the PM is able to make progress in the coming days and win a vote on the WAB but he is unable to get everything done by the end of the week there could then be an emergency summit held in Brussels on October 28.

If the PM's deal is still alive but more time is needed to get it through Parliament European leaders could agree to a short extension.

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