Advertisements
Dani Worthington (photo), associate professor Moorside Community Primary School in Halifax, warns of & # 39; crises & # 39; under mentors & # 39; rise & # 39; from year to year. She claims that she even sees the heads of children's walls, beats walls, kicks walls daily & # 39;

Child referrals to mental health clinics have risen by nearly 50 percent in three years, statistics show.

Advertisements

A probe has revealed that 31,531 of 11-year-olds were referred by their school for treatment in 2018.

This is an increase of 10,406 from the 21,125 references in 2015, the figures show.

Mental health experts and teachers have the situation a & # 39; crisis & # 39; mentioned, where the school staff saw the walls of the youth on a daily basis & # 39 ;.

Online bullying is the cause of the increase in & # 39; extreme mental health problems & # 39 ;, causing some students to commit suicide in school grounds.

Dani Worthington (photo), associate professor Moorside Community Primary School in Halifax, warns of & # 39; crises & # 39; under mentors & # 39; rise & # 39; from year to year. She claims that she even sees the heads of children's walls, beats walls, kicks walls daily & # 39;

Dani Worthington (photo), associate professor Moorside Community Primary School in Halifax, warns of & # 39; crises & # 39; under mentors & # 39; rise & # 39; from year to year. She claims that she even sees the heads of children's walls, beats walls, kicks walls daily & # 39;

Advertisements

One in ten school children in the UK has a diagnosed mental health condition, statistics from the Children & # 39; s Society show.

And five percent of young people under five have behavioral disorders, according to the Center for Mental Health. This is defined as a & # 39; heartless contempt for and aggression toward others & # 39 ;.

The problem is also widespread in the US, where up to 7.1 percent (4.4 million) of 2 to 17 year olds diagnosed with depression or anxiety were diagnosed, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

To discover how many children in the UK get the help they need, the BBC sent Freedom of Information (FOI) applications to 46 NHS mental health trusts.

The answers showed that seven confidants had rejected a student at primary school at least five times in the past four years.

And 12 students let mental health care wait for more than a year.

A primary school teacher even claimed that one of her students was rejected nine times for treatment and was on a waiting list for three years.

Advertisements

Dani Worthington, associate professor of Moorside Community Primary School in Halifax, told the BBC: & We are seeing an increase from year to year – more and more children with a variety of problems and it just seems harder and harder to manage.

& # 39; We have seen children knocking heads against walls, knocking walls, kicking walls, and this can sometimes happen daily for these children as they go through some sort of crisis. & # 39;

Sue Blair, professor at Pennine Way Primary School in Carlisle, claimed to have seen children who are only seven or eight years old, with many persistent online bullying and eating disorders for high school.

And Clem Coady, senior teacher at the Stoneraise School in Carlisle, said he had a student for two years in & # 39; extreme psychological distress & # 39; while waiting for treatment.

The Children's Commissioner for England, Anne Longfield, accused the & # 39; epidemic & # 39; of psychological health problems among young people due to the pressure of social media and increasingly demanding school environments.

Advertisements

Earlier this year, Molly Russell's father, who committed suicide at the age of 14 in November 2017, claimed that she was influenced by self-harm and social media suicide.

Molly Russell (photo) took her own life at the age of 14 in November 2017. Her father claimed she was influenced by self-harm and suicide content on social media

Molly Russell (photo) took her own life at the age of 14 in November 2017. Her father claimed she was influenced by self-harm and suicide content on social media

Molly Russell (photo) took her own life at the age of 14 in November 2017. Her father claimed she was influenced by self-harm and suicide content on social media

Sue Blair (photo), senior teacher at Pennine Way Primary School in Carlisle, claims to have seen students as young as seven or eight self-harm, which may be due to online bullying

Sue Blair (photo), senior teacher at Pennine Way Primary School in Carlisle, claims to have seen students as young as seven or eight self-harm, which may be due to online bullying

Sue Blair (photo), senior teacher at Pennine Way Primary School in Carlisle, claims to have seen students as young as seven or eight self-harm, which may be due to online bullying

THE SIGNS THAT YOUR CHILD CAN BE DEPRESSED AND WHAT IT CAN DO

Advertisements

Signs of depression in children can be:

  • Long-term sadness
  • Irritability
  • Lack of interest in things they used to enjoy
  • Fatigue and exhaustion
  • Insomnia or too much sleep
  • Poor concentration
  • indecision
  • Lack of trust
  • Eating too much or too little
  • Inability to relax
  • Feeling guilty or worthless
  • Numb for emotions
  • Thoughts about suicide or self-injury
  • Doing damage yourself

Some also have physical symptoms such as headache or stomach ache.

Older children can abuse alcohol or drugs.

Depression in children can occur as a result of family problems, bullying, other psychological problems or physical, emotional or sexual abuse.

It can be triggered by one event, such as a death or an accumulation of things.

Advertisements

If you suspect your child is depressed, try to talk to them about how they feel.

Let them know that you are worried and that you will be there when they need you.

If they don't want to talk to you, encourage them to contact another family member, a teacher, or a family friend.

If this does not help, contact your doctor, who may refer your child to a specialized mental healthcare service.

Source: NHS

The BBC also sent FOI requests to 500 primary schools throughout England.

This showed that 191 children have themselves suffered damage in school grounds during the past four years.

And even celebrate attempted suicide at school property.

Dr. Bernadka Dubicka, chair of the children's and youth faculty of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, called the figures & # 39; very disturbing & # 39 ;.

She gave & # 39; historically under-funded & # 39; blame mental health services because they could not keep up with demand.

Advertisements

A government spokesperson said it wants to improve mental health services for children as part of the NHS's long-term plan.

With an additional £ 2.3 billion ($ 2.8 billion) a year invested in support, 345,000 more children should have access to specialized care by 2023-to-24, the spokesperson added.

Ministers announced in February that schools will teach students of only four years about mental health.

The lessons help young people to beat depression, stay safe online and & # 39; self-care & # 39; to practice.

However, Dr. Dubicka warns that for some this may be & # 39; too little too late & # 39; is.

Advertisements

If you or someone you know has considered or are concerned about suicide, you can speak to professionals for confidential support:

  • For confidential support in the UK, call the Samaritans at 116123 or visit a local Samaritans branch, see www.samaritans.org for more information.
  • For confidential support in the US, call the National Suicide Prevention Line at 1-800-273-8255
  • For confidential support in Australia, call the Lifeline 24-hour crisis support on 13 11 14

If you are concerned about your child's mental health, call the free help line of the YoungMinds charity on 0808 802 5544.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) health