Red Arrows are aground after a Royal Navy Hawk jet crash caused by suspected engine failure

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The Red Arrows were grounded after a Royal Navy Hawk jet fighter crashed in the forest during a training exercise in a suspected engine failure.

Two pilots are in stable condition in the hospital after the crew of the 736 Naval Air Squadron, stationed at RNAS Culdrose in Helston, Cornwall, was knocked out of the jet on Thursday morning.

The two-seater Hawk T1, the same model jet used by the Red Arrows, crashed into the woods in the St Martin area near Helston.

The Ministry of Defense (MoD) has now launched an investigation and has temporarily suspended operations with Hawk T1 aircraft, including the Red Arrows.

A member of the RAF yesterday saw a drone detained in front of the debris from the Royal Navy crash near Helston, Cornwall.  Two pilots were ejected from the two-seater Hawk T1

A member of the RAF yesterday saw a drone detained in front of the debris from the Royal Navy crash near Helston, Cornwall. Two pilots were ejected from the two-seater Hawk T1

The Red Arrows were spotted by air on Wednesday afternoon (pictured) practicing their aerobatics over RAF Scampton in Lincolnshire.

The Red Arrows soared through the air on Wednesday afternoon (pictured) practicing their aerobatic moves over RAF Scampton in Lincolnshire.

The Red Arrows were spotted by air on Wednesday afternoon (pictured) practicing their aerobatics over RAF Scampton in Lincolnshire.

Secretary of Defense Johnny Mercer said engine failure was suspected as the cause of the crash, the report said BBC

A Defense Department spokeswoman said in a statement: “Security is our main concern.

“The RAF has decided to temporarily suspend Hawk T1 operations as a precaution while the investigation is ongoing.”

The pilots were found about half a mile from the main crash site after they were safely ejected.

Devon and Cornwall police said the crew was treated on the spot after the ejection and then flown by air ambulance to Derriford Hospital in Plymouth.

They remain in a stable condition “with no significant injuries,” police said.

The Red Arrows soared through the air Wednesday afternoon as they practiced their aerobatic moves in their famous ‘nine ships’ formation over RAF Scampton.

Training for the team would take place in Britain until mid-spring, before moving to a location with more predictable, stable weather.

The twin-seater is an advanced jet trainer that also plays the role of a light attack jet, and is the same jet used by the Red Arrows (file photo)

The twin-seater is an advanced jet trainer that also plays the role of a light attack jet, and is the same jet as used by the Red Arrows (photo file)

The twin-seater is an advanced jet trainer that also plays the role of a light attack jet, and is the same jet used by the Red Arrows (file photo)

Firefighters picked up the wreckage that had been scattered throughout the forest yesterday

Firefighters picked up the wreckage that had been scattered throughout the forest yesterday

Firefighters picked up the wreckage that had been scattered throughout the forest yesterday

A helmet was found nearby after the two pilots were taken to hospital for treatment.  They remain stable in the hospital

A helmet was found nearby after the two pilots were taken to hospital for treatment.  They remain stable in the hospital

A helmet was found nearby after the two pilots were taken to hospital for treatment. They remain stable in the hospital

A parachute from one of the pilots was seen caught in a tree yesterday after the incident

A parachute from one of the pilots was seen caught in a tree yesterday after the incident

A parachute from one of the pilots was seen caught in a tree yesterday after the incident

The jet crashed into a field in the St Martin area of ​​Helston on Thursday around 9:40 am, shortly after take-off

The jet crashed into a field in the St Martin area of ​​Helston on Thursday around 9:40 am, shortly after take-off

The jet crashed into a field in the St Martin area of ​​Helston on Thursday around 9:40 am, shortly after take-off

The Ministry of Defense said earlier: ‘Two pilots are being monitored by medics after being ejected from a Royal Navy Hawk aircraft of 736 Naval Air Squadron on a flight from RNAS Culdrose.

‘An investigation will start in due course. We will not provide further details at this time. ‘

Eyewitness Layla Astley said: ‘I saw the plane flying low over our house, I heard a thumping sound, it flew further over our fields and then there was a loud bang and we saw two pilots eject.

The risky job of a Red Arrows pilot

Participating in the Red Arrows is the pinnacle of many pilots’ careers, but the track also involves high risks.

The fatal crash in March 2018 that killed engineer Corporal Jonathan Bayliss was the first major incident since 2011, when two members were killed.

Flight Lieutenant Sean Cunningham, 35, was killed at RAF Scampton, Lincolnshire, after being accidentally thrown from his Hawk T1 while conducting pre-flight security checks while his plane was aground.

Growing up in Coventry, the South African officer was thrown 90 meters and his parachute could not be deployed during the incident on November 8, 2011.

Three months earlier, Flt Lt Egging, 33, died after a crash at the Bournemouth Air Festival.

An inquest heard he may have succumbed to G-force limitation before attempting to correct his course in the pre-collision moments.

P.Before 2018, 15 other Red Arrows accidents had been reported since 1969, resulting in 10 fatalities.

T.The first death, in 1969, involved a pilot flying into trees while practicing.

In the worst tragedy to hit the display team, Flt Lt Euan Perreaux, Flt Lt John Lewis, Flt Lt John Haddock and Flt Lt Colin Armstrong were killed when two Gnat aircraft collided in mid-air at RAF Kemble, Gloucestershire, in 1971.

Two more pilots were killed in 1978 and one more in 1988. But there were no more deaths until those killed in 2011.

I watched their parachutes open. Then I saw the plane bank to the left and over the top of a hill before I heard a very loud bang. There was no smoke or fire and I hear from the locals that fortunately no one was seriously injured. ‘

Police warned all members of the public who found debris from the jet not to touch it and should contact the police instead.

Chief Inspector Pete Thomas said, “This remains a complex scene managed by emergency services throughout the day.

‘My thanks go to those who responded so quickly this morning and who worked together effectively to continue the investigation.

“We would ask the public to keep their distance from the area while the investigation continues and investigations are launched.”

The research will be transferred to the Royal Navy in due course.

Martin-Baker, ejection seat manufacturer, said it was the Royal Navy’s first ejection in 18 years.

The company wrote on Facebook: ‘A Royal Navy Hawk aircraft from 736 Naval Air Squadron crashed this morning on a flight from RNAS Culdrose. Both pilots were successfully ejected.

“This is the Royal Navy’s first ejection in 18 years and the last is Martin-Baker’s 7,000th ejection in 2003.”

It follows that the government has unveiled plans to phase out a massive amount of fighters, transport aircraft, trainers and helicopters in the coming years.

The RAF loses 114 manned aircraft in the defense overhaul announced earlier this week.

They will be replaced by the next generation of unmanned combat platforms, including long-range Protector aircraft and ‘swarming drones’ that work alongside conventional attack aircraft.

The changes were outlined in a defense document that includes £ 3 billion for new vehicles, long-range missile systems, electronic warfare and cyber capabilities.

Entitled ‘Defense in a Competitive Age’, it sets out how troops will spend more time overseas to support allies and deter hostile forces such as Russia, identified in the Integrated Review as the UK’s ‘most acute threat’ .

It includes plans to retire the RAF’s fleet of 14 Hercules C-130 transport aircraft, 24 Typhoon fighters, the Royal Flight’s four aircraft, 36 Hawk training jets and seven E-3D Sentry early warning aircraft. plus 20 Puma and nine Chinook helicopters.

Crash investigators came to the scene yesterday to determine what happened to the plane

Crash investigators came to the scene yesterday to determine what happened to the plane

Crash investigators came to the scene yesterday to determine what happened to the plane

Emergency services at the site of the crash where the naval jet crashed on Thursday

Emergency services at the site of the crash where the naval jet crashed on Thursday

Emergency services at the site of the crash where the naval jet crashed on Thursday

A Cornwall Air Ambulance helicopter in a field next to the crash site on Thursday

A Cornwall Air Ambulance helicopter in a field next to the crash site on Thursday

A Cornwall Air Ambulance helicopter in a field next to the crash site on Thursday

Debris was scattered across the field and adjacent forests in the aftermath of the crash.  Pictured: Police on site

Debris was scattered across the field and adjacent forests in the aftermath of the crash.  Pictured: Police on site

Debris was scattered across the field and adjacent forests in the aftermath of the crash. Pictured: Police on site