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Stingrays can be hard to see in the water, because they often spend a lot of time buried in the sand, moving with the swing of the tide

Record 176 people are stung by STINGRAYS just one day after swimming too far away at low tide on California beach

  • Due to warm temperatures, more people went to Huntington Beach to swim
  • Rays can be difficult to recognize because they partially bury themselves in sand
  • Those who were injured on the beach, described stitches as & # 39; searing & # 39; and & # 39; intense & # 39;
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A record number of 176 swimmers were stung on Saturday by stingrays on a beach in California.

Huntington Beach officials said that a record number, by this time of year, had been injured by the marine animals after swimming too far away at low tide.

They said that the warm temperatures on the first day of the weekend tempted more people to swim and therefore contributed to the relatively higher number that was put into it.

Moreover, it is believed that the stingrays themselves were attracted by the warm water.

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Stingrays can be hard to see in the water, because they often spend a lot of time buried in the sand, moving with the swing of the tide

Stingrays can be hard to see in the water, because they often spend a lot of time buried in the sand, moving with the swing of the tide

Lifeguard Josh Raymond told Newsweek that the creatures were attracted by the rising water temperatures.

Cooler weather conditions on Sunday saw fewer reports of stingray-related injuries.

In an attempt to warn people of the stingray risk, the Huntington Beach Fire Department issued warnings, Eric Dieterman told the Marine Safety Division. local media.

& # 39; We come from a pretty aggressive public safety campaign … advising people to stay out of the water whenever possible, & # 39; he said.

More than 500 people were injured by stingrays on the beaches of California during Labor Day weekend in a separate wave of injuries last month.

Stock image shows people enjoying the waters of Huntington Beach. This weekend a higher than normal number of people were seen on the beach for the time of year. This led to a record number of swimmers being stung by a stingray
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Stock image shows people enjoying the waters of Huntington Beach. This weekend a higher than normal number of people were seen on the beach for the time of year. This led to a record number of swimmers being stung by a stingray

Stock image shows people enjoying the waters of Huntington Beach. This weekend a higher than normal number of people were seen on the beach for the time of year. This led to a record number of swimmers being stung by a stingray

Lifeguards on the beach have treated injured swimmers by soaking the deep puncture wounds on their feet to relieve the pain.

Radiation schools are usually found in the shallow coastal waters of more temperate seas.

They can be difficult to recognize because the rays tend to spend a lot of time partially buried in the sand and move with the sweep of the tide.

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Lee Perkins, a resident of Huntington Beach, was stabbed just two weeks ago. He described the pain as & # 39; quite intense & # 39 ;.

& # 39; It is definitely a painful nerve pain, & # 39; he said.

The sting was seriously infected.

Perkins told it Daily pilot he was relieved that his 10-year-old son who swam with him that day was not stung by the marine animal.

The pain of being stung by a stingray is described as & # 39; intense & # 39; and & # 39; searing & # 39; by those who have experienced it

The pain of being stung by a stingray is described as & # 39; intense & # 39; and & # 39; searing & # 39; by those who have experienced it

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The pain of being stung by a stingray is described as & # 39; intense & # 39; and & # 39; searing & # 39; by those who have experienced it

A man shared his experience with the stabbing marine animals in a Facebook post

A man shared his experience with the stabbing marine animals in a Facebook post

A man shared his experience with the stabbing marine animals in a Facebook post

Another man on Facebook, Aaron Newman, said he went outside to cool down after a day of flag football on the beach.

& # 39; The tide was super low and I shuffled my feet but was still tagged & quot ;, he said.

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& # 39; It felt like something through my foot. I ran out of the water to the lifeguard stand and got a bag of warm water to soak my foot. & # 39;

He said that after he went home, he kept soaking his injured foot until the pain disappeared.

& # 39; Now I know why they are called STINGrays and get stung is not a joke, & # 39; he said.

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