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Podiatrist Dr Todd Brennan, 35, shaves dead skin from a gaping hole in the sole of a diabetic's foot

Rebellious moment, a diabetic with a gaping GAT in his foot gets patched up as a podiatrist scrapes the wound to remove dead skin

  • Dr. Todd Brennan, 35, treated the patient in the Healthy Feet Podiatry clinic in Florida
  • The patient had developed an ulcer that became infected without their knowledge
  • Because diabetics have poor circulation, they had no idea that the skin was eroded
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This is the stomach-churning moment when a podiatrist holds a gaping hole in the foot of the foot of a diabetic patient.

Dr Todd Brennan, 35, was filmed scraping the wound with a scalpel to remove the dead skin before wrapping a bandage around the cut.

The unidentified patient was treated at the Healthy Feet Podiatry clinic in Wesley Chapel, Florida, after developing the gaping pain over the course of several weeks.

It started as a blister, but quickly became infected and eroded the skin on their feet, without the patient noticing.

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Podiatrist Dr Todd Brennan, 35, shaves dead skin from a gaping hole in the sole of a diabetic's foot

Podiatrist Dr Todd Brennan, 35, shaves dead skin from a gaping hole in the sole of a diabetic's foot

He sealed it with cotton wool at the Healthy Feet Podiatry clinic in Wesley Chapel, Florida

He sealed it with cotton wool at the Healthy Feet Podiatry clinic in Wesley Chapel, Florida

He sealed it with cotton wool at the Healthy Feet Podiatry clinic in Wesley Chapel, Florida

The wound started as a blister, but quickly became infected and eroded the skin on the patient's foot without the patient noticing. Pictured: the podiatrist connects the cut

The wound started as a blister, but quickly became infected and eroded the skin on the patient's foot without the patient noticing. Pictured: the podiatrist connects the cut

The wound started as a blister, but quickly became infected and eroded the skin on the patient's foot without the patient noticing. Pictured: the podiatrist connects the cut

Every 30 seconds, someone in the world with diabetes has amputated a lower limb, according to the Diabetes UK charity.

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People with diabetes are more likely to be admitted to hospital with a foot ulcer than with any other complication.

This is because the condition can lead to poor circulation and reduced feeling in the feet.

It means that patients can develop a blister or small burn without realizing it, which increases the chance that a wound will develop and then become infected.

WHAT IS DIABETIC FOOT?

Diabetic foot occurs when ulcers are caused by minor cuts, leaving patients at risk of amputation.

It occurs in a maximum of one in 10 diabetes patients.

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Diabetic foot is caused by high glucose levels over a longer period of time leading to nerve damage or loss of blood circulation to the extremities of the body.

This can cause feet to become numb.

People with diabetes must regularly check their feet for signs of damage, including cuts, swelling, hardening skin and discoloration.

Source: Diabetes.co.uk

Poor circulation also means that wounds do not heal so well – and are more likely to get infected.

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Healthy Feet Podiatry co-owner, Leo Krawetz, said: “The procedure was painless because the patient had neuropathy [she could not feel her feet].

& # 39; Dr. Brennan was satisfied knowing that he was helping a patient get better and that they were better than before he started. & # 39;

Last month a diabetic woman had to have her leg amputated after an ingrown toenail became gangrenus.

Heather Satchwell, 27, from Newhall, Derbyshire, was training in February 2015 for a 5 km charity run when she saw her nail.

She went straight to the hospital because she had type 1 diabetes and knew that she was at higher risk of infection due to nerve damage to her feet.

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Doctors had to amputate the big toe on her right foot in June 2016, months after she had removed the infected nail.

Heather Satchwell, who has diabetes, had to amputate her leg after an ingrown toenail was caused by running gangrene

Heather Satchwell, who has diabetes, had to amputate her leg after an ingrown toenail was caused by running gangrene

Heather Satchwell, who has diabetes, had to amputate her leg after an ingrown toenail was caused by running gangrene

The former police and municipal CCTV employee must now rely on a prosthetic leg and a wheelchair to travel, which has been six life-changing for her and her daughter, Gia

The former police and municipal CCTV employee must now rely on a prosthetic leg and a wheelchair to travel, which has been six life-changing for her and her daughter, Gia

The former police and municipal CCTV employee must now rely on a prosthetic leg and a wheelchair to travel, which has been six life-changing for her and her daughter, Gia

She had finally amputated her leg in 2018, after the infection would not give in and threatened her life, doctors said.

Mrs. Satchwell must now rely on a leg prosthesis and a wheelchair to move around, which has been life-changing for her and her six-year-old daughter Gia.

They had to find a handicap-friendly home and have since appealed to the public to help build a garden that they can both enjoy.

HOW CAN DIABETES LEAD TO FOOT GAIN?

People with diabetes need amputated toes or feet much more because their injuries do not heal normally.

High blood sugar levels can cause nerve damage, meaning that patients cannot feel their skin and may not know when they have a wound or feel how severe it is.

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And diabetes limits blood circulation in the legs, which slows healing because oxygen and nutrients are scarce.

The combination of these two factors means that it can take longer for people to get over injuries and the healing time means that there is more opportunity to become infected or meat die as a result of gangrene.

If an injury becomes too infected or untreatable, the affected part of the body may need to be cut off.

Source: American Podiatric Medicine Association

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