Real Housewives star Meghan King Edmonds says her one-year-old son & # 039; progress sees & # 039;

Reality star Meghan King Edmonds says her son is making progress after being diagnosed with permanent brain damage.

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Edmonds, 34, formerly from The Real Housewives of Orange County, shared a photo on Instagram of himself and a one-year-old Hart.

The two are located in a hyperbaric compressed oxygen chamber that is intended to loosen tight muscles and stimulate brain cells and neurons.

She said her son has become considerably better at crawling, stepping with help, and lifting his legs.

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Former Real Housewives star Meghan King Edmonds shared a photo of herself and her one-year-old son Hart in a hyperbaric compressed oxygen chamber (photo)

Former Real Housewives star Meghan King Edmonds shared a photo of herself and her one-year-old son Hart in a hyperbaric compressed oxygen chamber (photo)

Hart suffers from Periventricular leukomalacia, a type of brain damage that affects the white matter in the brain. Pictured: Edmond with on the left Hart and his twin brother Hayes on the right
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Hart suffers from Periventricular leukomalacia, a type of brain damage that affects the white matter in the brain. Pictured: Edmond with on the left Hart and his twin brother Hayes on the right

Hart suffers from Periventricular leukomalacia, a type of brain damage that affects the white matter in the brain. Pictured: Edmond with on the left Hart and his twin brother Hayes on the right

Premature babies are most likely to have the condition, but the sons of Edmonds were not born prematurely. Pictured: Hart, left and Hayes, right

Premature babies are most likely to have the condition, but the sons of Edmonds were not born prematurely. Pictured: Hart, left and Hayes, right

Premature babies are most likely to have the condition, but the sons of Edmonds were not born prematurely. Pictured: Hart, left and Hayes, right

In a blog post earlier this month, Edmonds said that she and her husband, former MLB player Jim Edmonds, knew something was wrong with Hart not long after he was born.

After noticing developmental differences between Hart and his twin brother Hayes, she started looking for the opinion of doctors.

Her pediatrician assured her that he & # 39; okay & # 39; , but Edmonds eventually made an appointment with a neurologist.

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& # 39; I begged a neurologist who specializes in cerebral palsy (I jumped through hoops to get this appointment, so many hoops) and she said it could be fine with him. I then begged for an MRI, & Edmonds wrote.

Three days after the MRI, her son was diagnosed with Periventricular Leukomalacia (PVL).

PVL is a type of brain damage that affects the white matter of the brain, the tissue through which messages pass through the central nervous system.

It usually occurs after a lack of oxygen and changes in blood flow to this area of ​​the brain before 32 weeks of pregnancy.

Premature babies are most likely to have the condition.

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One 1996 study discovered that as many as 16 percent of NICU preemies were diagnosed with PVL.

However, the sons of Edmond were not born prematurely, so her doctors believe it happened while she was six or seven months pregnant.

Common symptoms include vision problems, movement problems, and developmental delays. Many run the risk of developing cerebral palsy.

There is currently no cure for PVL, but physical therapy and speech therapy can help.

The room was intended to stimulate brain cells and neurons and to loosen tight muscles. Pictured: Heart, right and Hayes, left,

The room was intended to stimulate brain cells and neurons and to loosen tight muscles. Pictured: Heart, right and Hayes, left,

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The room was intended to stimulate brain cells and neurons and to loosen tight muscles. Pictured: Heart, right and Hayes, left,

After a few dives, Edmonds says that her son is getting better at lifting his legs, crawling and taking steps with help. Pictured: Hart with his father Jim Edmonds

After a few dives, Edmonds says that her son is getting better at lifting his legs, crawling and taking steps with help. Pictured: Hart with his father Jim Edmonds

Hart (photo) also visits physiotherapy and visits a chiropractor

Hart (photo) also visits physiotherapy and visits a chiropractor

After a few dives, Edmonds says that her son is getting better at lifting his legs, crawling and taking steps with help. Hart also attends physiotherapy and visits a chiropractor. Pictured: Hart with his father Jim Edmonds, left and right

The Instagram post, shared on Friday, shows Edmond's kissing Hart as he smiles at the camera.

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& # 39; Four times a week & # 39; diving & # 39; Jimmy or I with Hart in a hyperbaric compressed air chamber, & # 39; she wrote.

& # 39; After 5 dives we already see progress: lifting his left leg on stairs when his right is stuck, crawling bear (maybe trying to stand?), Taking more willing steps with help and crossing from the couch to the coffee table.

# Is it because of this alternative therapy, is it because he is just getting older, is it because of PT or is it because of his 3x / weekly chiropractor visits? Who knows, but it doesn't hurt! Go Hart, go! & # 39;

Edmonds has posted other photos & videos in the past in physiotherapy.

For more than two weeks she shared a video of Hart in a swing while a physical therapist rocked it back and forth.

& # 39; Hart loves this swing at PT! & # 39; she wrote. & # 39; It helps him build his abdominal muscles and stabilize his core to ultimately give him a better balance and strength. & # 39;

WHAT IS PVL?

Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is a type of brain damage.

A person with PVL has damaged and dead cells in the white matter at the top of the brain, which control impulses and muscle control.

Most people with PVL (60-100 percent) develop cerebral palsy. PVL is one of the four main causes of cerebral palsy.

WHAT DOES PVL CAUSE?

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It is usually caused by a lack of oxygen to those areas before birth, usually between 26 and 34 weeks of pregnancy.

It is possible that the mother has contracted an infection during pregnancy that has caused a disruption, or that she has an existing condition, such as low blood pressure.

Twins have a higher risk of being born with PVL, especially if they are premature or have very little weight at birth.

A lack of oxygen at birth also increases the risk of PVL.

THERAPY

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PVL cannot be cured, but physical and speech therapy can help.

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