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Soldiers search the fields and stack wrecks on a handy mountain around the broken engine of a Messerschmitt that plunged vertically into the South Downs at Falmer, near Brighton on October 1, 1940

While the massive and widespread land fighting in Europe during the Second World War left their own specific paths of destruction and debris, the struggle for British skies cost the country enormous costs.

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In the aftermath, the country was confronted with widespread destruction caused by bombing, disruption and damage to infrastructure.

This stunning collection of images, made between 1940 and 1942, describes the extent of the destruction caused by Hitler's Luftwaffe at the turning point of the Second World War.

Crashed airplanes strewn with fields, houses were blown apart and bombs were latently waiting to be discovered.

Soldiers search the fields and stack wrecks on a handy mountain around the broken engine of a Messerschmitt that plunged vertically into the South Downs at Falmer, near Brighton on October 1, 1940

Soldiers search the fields and stack wrecks on a handy mountain around the broken engine of a Messerschmitt that plunged vertically into the South Downs at Falmer, near Brighton on October 1, 1940

This was the aftermath when a Heinkel 111 of 3./KGr126 was hit and turned off by the Harwich anti-aircraft battery before it got out of hand in homes on Victoria Road, Clacton-on-Sea, killing all four crew members. There were three & # 39; C & # 39; mines on board, two of which exploded in the crash. The subsequent fire, which destroyed a number of houses and damaged many more, killed two civilians and wounded another 150
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This was the aftermath when a Heinkel 111 of 3./KGr126 was hit and turned off by the Harwich anti-aircraft battery before it got out of hand in homes on Victoria Road, Clacton-on-Sea, killing all four crew members. There were three & # 39; C & # 39; mines on board, two of which exploded in the crash. The subsequent fire, which destroyed a number of houses and damaged many more, killed two civilians and wounded another 150

This was the aftermath when a Heinkel 111 of 3./KGr126 was hit and turned off by the Harwich anti-aircraft battery before it got out of hand in homes on Victoria Road, Clacton-on-Sea, killing all four crew members. There were three & # 39; C & # 39; mines on board, two of which exploded in the crash. The subsequent fire, which destroyed a number of houses and damaged many more, killed two civilians and wounded another 150

Crashing Heinkel 111s seemed to have a certain affinity for houses, ending in the backyard of a house in Hale near Fordingbridge in Hampshire on the night of August 29-30, 1940, after being shot by a Spitfire of 92 Squadron flown by Plt Off AR Wright

Crashing Heinkel 111s seemed to have a certain affinity for houses, ending in the backyard of a house in Hale near Fordingbridge in Hampshire on the night of August 29-30, 1940, after being shot by a Spitfire of 92 Squadron flown by Plt Off AR Wright

Crashing Heinkel 111s seemed to have a certain affinity for houses, ending in the backyard of a house in Hale near Fordingbridge in Hampshire on the night of August 29-30, 1940, after being shot by a Spitfire of 92 Squadron flown by Plt Off AR Wright

A Heinkel 111 that flew on August 8, 1940 on a mountain near Eastman's Cairn, Cairnsmore-of-Fleet. While the RAF personnel and intelligence officers reached the wreck, it turned out to be impossible to get it off the mountain and in fact the wreck remained in place until at least the 1980s when it was lifted by helicopter for museum display

A Heinkel 111 that flew on August 8, 1940 on a mountain near Eastman's Cairn, Cairnsmore-of-Fleet. While the RAF personnel and intelligence officers reached the wreck, it turned out to be impossible to get it off the mountain and in fact the wreck remained in place until at least the 1980s when it was lifted by helicopter for museum display

A Heinkel 111 that flew on August 8, 1940 on a mountain near Eastman's Cairn, Cairnsmore-of-Fleet. While the RAF personnel and intelligence officers reached the wreck, it turned out to be impossible to get it off the mountain and in fact the wreck remained in place until at least the 1980s when it was lifted by helicopter for museum display

This Junkers 88, with his broken back, was shot on September 9, 1940 at Newells Farm, Nuthurst, West Sussex, where it was essentially caught & # 39; by souvenir hunters when this photo was taken. The swastikas that were stripped of their tails were found when the police arrested a man and left him on the site

This Junkers 88, with his broken back, was shot on September 9, 1940 at Newells Farm, Nuthurst, West Sussex, where it was essentially caught & # 39; by souvenir hunters when this photo was taken. The swastikas that were stripped of their tails were found when the police arrested a man and left him on the site

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This Junkers 88, with his broken back, was shot on September 9, 1940 at Newells Farm, Nuthurst, West Sussex, where it was essentially caught & # 39; by souvenir hunters when this photo was taken. The swastikas that were stripped of their tails were found when the police arrested a man and left him on the site

Preparations for war resulted in an increased number of training-related and other RAF aircraft accidents. This was the mutilated wreck of hurricane L1593 from Biggin Hill-based 79 squadron photographed at Ditchling Common in East Sussex, where the plane crashed during a thunderstorm on June 20, 1939 during a routing flight. The accident resulted in the death of his pilot, Sgt L.F. Davis, RAF

Preparations for war resulted in an increased number of training-related and other RAF aircraft accidents. This was the mutilated wreck of hurricane L1593 from Biggin Hill-based 79 squadron photographed at Ditchling Common in East Sussex, where the plane crashed during a thunderstorm on June 20, 1939 during a routing flight. The accident resulted in the death of his pilot, Sgt L.F. Davis, RAF

Preparations for war resulted in an increased number of training-related and other RAF aircraft accidents. This was the mutilated wreck of hurricane L1593 from Biggin Hill-based 79 squadron photographed at Ditchling Common in East Sussex, where the plane crashed during a thunderstorm on June 20, 1939 during a routing flight. The accident resulted in the death of his pilot, Sgt L.F. Davis, RAF

The first enemy planes were hit over the British Isles from October 1939, but in the early 1940s the Luftwaffe activity over the country increased and increased as the battle of France reached its peak and culminated in the evacuation of Dunkirk.

The first enemy planes were hit over the British Isles from October 1939, but in the early 1940s the Luftwaffe activity over the country increased and increased as the battle of France reached its peak and culminated in the evacuation of Dunkirk.

The first enemy planes were hit over the British Isles from October 1939, but in the early 1940s the Luftwaffe activity over the country increased and increased as the battle of France reached its peak and culminated in the evacuation of Dunkirk.

This was slightly less than that of a Heinkel 115 seaplane that crashed on 7 June 1940 and exploded in The Old Rectory, Eyke, Suffolk. The plane had been on a mine laying, but flew to the salvage team. the ground after the pilot was apparently blinded by searchlight beams
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This was slightly less than that of a Heinkel 115 seaplane that crashed on 7 June 1940 and exploded in The Old Rectory, Eyke, Suffolk. The plane had been on a mine laying, but flew to the salvage team. the ground after the pilot was apparently blinded by searchlight beams

This was slightly less than that of a Heinkel 115 seaplane that crashed on 7 June 1940 and exploded in The Old Rectory, Eyke, Suffolk. The plane had been on a mine laying, but flew to the salvage team. the ground after the pilot was apparently blinded by searchlight beams

When Uffz Leo Zaunbrecher crashed his damaged Messerschmitt 109 between the grain stakes at Lower Mays Farm, Selmeston on August 12, 1940, the hunter had not yet ended his useful life. His little red devil logo on the bonnet of the harbor engine caught the attention of both souvenir hunters and photographers

When Uffz Leo Zaunbrecher crashed his damaged Messerschmitt 109 between the grain stakes at Lower Mays Farm, Selmeston on August 12, 1940, the hunter had not yet ended his useful life. His little red devil logo on the bonnet of the harbor engine caught the attention of both souvenir hunters and photographers

When Uffz Leo Zaunbrecher crashed his damaged Messerschmitt 109 between the grain stakes at Lower Mays Farm, Selmeston on August 12, 1940, the hunter had not yet ended his useful life. His little red devil logo on the bonnet of the harbor engine caught the attention of both souvenir hunters and photographers

For example, the volume of aircraft that was shot down in the East Kent region was a temporary & # 39; holding & # 39; depot was located in Elham, Kent, where several wreck pieces of locally crashed aircraft were assembled prior to removal to RAF Faygate for further processing and shipment to the Northern Aluminum Company depot in Banbury

For example, the volume of aircraft that was shot down in the East Kent region was a temporary & # 39; holding & # 39; depot was located in Elham, Kent, where several wreck pieces of locally crashed aircraft were assembled prior to removal to RAF Faygate for further processing and shipment to the Northern Aluminum Company depot in Banbury

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For example, the volume of aircraft that was shot down in the East Kent region was a temporary & # 39; holding & # 39; depot was located in Elham, Kent, where several wreck pieces of locally crashed aircraft were assembled prior to removal to RAF Faygate for further processing and shipment to the Northern Aluminum Company depot in Banbury

For example, the volume of aircraft that was shot down in the East Kent region was a temporary & # 39; holding & # 39; depot was located in Elham, Kent, where several wreck pieces of locally crashed aircraft were assembled prior to removal to RAF Faygate for further processing and shipment to the Northern Aluminum Company depot in Banbury

For example, the volume of aircraft that was shot down in the East Kent region was a temporary & # 39; holding & # 39; depot was located in Elham, Kent, where several wreck pieces of locally crashed aircraft were assembled prior to removal to RAF Faygate for further processing and shipment to the Northern Aluminum Company depot in Banbury

For example, the volume of aircraft that was shot down in the East Kent region was a temporary & # 39; holding & # 39; depot was located in Elham, Kent, where several wreck pieces of locally crashed aircraft were assembled prior to removal to RAF Faygate for further processing and shipment to the Northern Aluminum Company depot in Banbury

At the Banbury processing plant, employees carry part of the Dornier 17 fuselage brought from Paddock Wood crash site on July 3, 1940 (see page 19). A multitude of other wreckage from other enemy aircraft await the smelter

At the Banbury processing plant, employees carry part of the Dornier 17 fuselage brought from Paddock Wood crash site on July 3, 1940 (see page 19). A multitude of other wreckage from other enemy aircraft await the smelter

At the Banbury processing plant, employees carry part of the Dornier 17 fuselage brought from Paddock Wood crash site on July 3, 1940 (see page 19). A multitude of other wreckage from other enemy aircraft await the smelter

Other transport companies were also used to collect and transport aircraft wrecks. Bizarre however, this truck belonged to the British American Tobacco Company Ltd, but is busier in moving a Heinkel 111 instead of cigarettes. Very much of an overload, it will be clear that the main landing wheels run on the road on either side of the truck bed and almost act as stabilizer wheels.
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Other transport companies were also used to collect and transport aircraft wrecks. Bizarre however, this truck belonged to the British American Tobacco Company Ltd, but is busier in moving a Heinkel 111 instead of cigarettes. Very much of an overload, it will be clear that the main landing wheels run on the road on either side of the truck bed and almost act as stabilizer wheels.

Other transport companies were also used to collect and transport aircraft wrecks. Bizarre however, this truck belonged to the British American Tobacco Company Ltd, but is busier in moving a Heinkel 111 instead of cigarettes. Very much of an overload, it will be clear that the main landing wheels run on the road on either side of the truck bed and almost act as stabilizer wheels.

Soldiers choose among all the remains of a Junkers 88 shot at Church Farm, Aylesford on August 18, 1940. The plane is completely broken up and only the main wing-spruce is recognizable in this photo. Crash Inspector Pilot Officer Bernard Clarke had to visit this crash site where he noted: & # 39; Scrap only & # 39;

Soldiers choose among all the remains of a Junkers 88 shot at Church Farm, Aylesford on August 18, 1940. The plane is completely broken up and only the main wing-spruce is recognizable in this photo. Crash Inspector Pilot Officer Bernard Clarke had to visit this crash site where he noted: & # 39; Scrap only & # 39;

Soldiers choose among all the remains of a Junkers 88 shot at Church Farm, Aylesford on August 18, 1940. The plane is completely broken up and only the main wing-spruce is recognizable in this photo. Crash Inspector Pilot Officer Bernard Clarke had to visit this crash site where he noted: & # 39; Scrap only & # 39;

This time, a RAF pilot and a Royal Artillery soldier are investigating seatbelts of 7.92 mm in the wreck of a Messerschmitt 109 shot in Chelsham, near RAF Biggin Hill on August 30, 1940. Bullets were popular, though dangerous, souvenirs, and became valuable & # 39; currency & # 39; for schoolboy collectors. The fact that bullets or cannon shells were alive and dangerous made little difference to collectors

This time, a RAF pilot and a Royal Artillery soldier are investigating seatbelts of 7.92 mm in the wreck of a Messerschmitt 109 shot in Chelsham, near RAF Biggin Hill on August 30, 1940. Bullets were popular, though dangerous, souvenirs, and became valuable & # 39; currency & # 39; for schoolboy collectors. The fact that bullets or cannon shells were alive and dangerous made little difference to collectors

This time, a RAF pilot and a Royal Artillery soldier are investigating seatbelts of 7.92 mm in the wreck of a Messerschmitt 109 shot in Chelsham, near RAF Biggin Hill on August 30, 1940. Bullets were popular, though dangerous, souvenirs, and became valuable & # 39; currency & # 39; for schoolboy collectors. The fact that bullets or cannon shells were alive and dangerous made little difference to collectors

There was almost nothing left here, let alone bullets, that someone could pick up. This was more like a bomb crater, where a Messerschmitt 109 fell into a drainage ditch on Broad Marshes on October 25, 1940 in Guestling in East Sussex after his pilot had wounded and taken out in captivity. For example, the force of the collision in the soft ground was that the plane has almost completely disappeared
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There was almost nothing left here, let alone bullets, that someone could pick up. This was more like a bomb crater, where a Messerschmitt 109 fell into a drainage ditch on Broad Marshes on October 25, 1940 in Guestling in East Sussex after his pilot had wounded and taken out in captivity. For example, the force of the collision in the soft ground was that the plane has almost completely disappeared

There was almost nothing left here, let alone bullets, that someone could pick up. This was more like a bomb crater, where a Messerschmitt 109 fell into a drainage ditch on Broad Marshes on October 25, 1940 in Guestling in East Sussex after his pilot had wounded and taken out in captivity. For example, the force of the collision in the soft ground was that the plane has almost completely disappeared

Repaired by the Coles crane, the Messerschmitt 109 is enthusiastically received by the RAF salvage gang. One group focuses on the wing rifle and its ammunition, while another party seems more interested in what they can find in the cockpit

Repaired by the Coles crane, the Messerschmitt 109 is enthusiastically received by the RAF salvage gang. One group focuses on the wing rifle and its ammunition, while another party seems more interested in what they can find in the cockpit

Repaired by the Coles crane, the Messerschmitt 109 is enthusiastically received by the RAF salvage gang. One group focuses on the wing rifle and its ammunition, while another party seems more interested in what they can find in the cockpit

A downed Heinkel plane was taken from Hildenborough to Mitcham Common in Surrey, where it again triggered crowds and more pennies for the Spitfire Fund's treasure chest.

A downed Heinkel plane was taken from Hildenborough to Mitcham Common in Surrey, where it again triggered crowds and more pennies for the Spitfire Fund's treasure chest.

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A downed Heinkel plane was taken from Hildenborough to Mitcham Common in Surrey, where it again triggered crowds and more pennies for the Spitfire Fund's treasure chest.

This Heinkel 111 can be seen temporarily in the front parking garage of The Half Moon pub in Hildenborough in Kent, and only a very short distance from where it was shot on September 11, 1940. A civilian truck has been put into service to finish the wreck

This Heinkel 111 can be seen temporarily in the front parking garage of The Half Moon pub in Hildenborough in Kent, and only a very short distance from where it was shot on September 11, 1940. A civilian truck has been put into service to finish the wreck

This Heinkel 111 can be seen temporarily in the front parking garage of The Half Moon pub in Hildenborough in Kent, and only a very short distance from where it was shot on September 11, 1940. A civilian truck has been put into service to finish the wreck

It was not only the transport that sometimes had a tough job. Here a party drags out of 49 million parts of a crashed plane over a field in Kent. Judging by the empty hop garden and warm clothing, this is either very early in 1940 or much later in the year

It was not only the transport that sometimes had a tough job. Here a party drags out of 49 million parts of a crashed plane over a field in Kent. Judging by the empty hop garden and warm clothing, this is either very early in 1940 or much later in the year

It was not only the transport that sometimes had a tough job. Here a party drags out of 49 million parts of a crashed plane over a field in Kent. Judging by the empty hop garden and warm clothing, this is either very early in 1940 or much later in the year

The Royal Engineers lend a hand in helping a bridge and a blockade while lifting the Messerschmitt 109 flown in by Oblt Egon Troha of 9/JG3 who made an emergency landing with a damaged radiator at Westcourt Farm, Sheperdswell, Kent on 29 October 1940
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The Royal Engineers lend a hand in helping a bridge and a blockade while lifting the Messerschmitt 109 flown in by Oblt Egon Troha of 9/JG3 who made an emergency landing with a damaged radiator at Westcourt Farm, Sheperdswell, Kent on 29 October 1940

The Royal Engineers lend a hand in helping a bridge and a blockade while lifting the Messerschmitt 109 flown in by Oblt Egon Troha of 9/JG3 who made an emergency landing with a damaged radiator at Westcourt Farm, Sheperdswell, Kent on 29 October 1940

A crane picks up an inverted Messerschmitt in Windsor Great Park on September 30, 1940 when a Messerschmitt 109 of 7./JG27 made an emergency landing there after being damaged by hunters during a bomber escort mission to London. In carrying out the emergency landing, Oblt Karl Fischer & # 39; s Me turned 109 on his back, although Fischer was miraculously caught unscathed after what could easily have been a fatal crash

A crane picks up an inverted Messerschmitt in Windsor Great Park on September 30, 1940 when a Messerschmitt 109 of 7./JG27 made an emergency landing there after being damaged by hunters during a bomber escort mission to London. In carrying out the emergency landing, Oblt Karl Fischer & # 39; s Me turned 109 on his back, although Fischer was miraculously caught unscathed after what could easily have been a fatal crash

A crane picks up an inverted Messerschmitt in Windsor Great Park on September 30, 1940 when a Messerschmitt 109 of 7./JG27 made an emergency landing there after being damaged by hunters during a bomber escort mission to London. In carrying out the emergency landing, Oblt Karl Fischer & # 39; s Me turned 109 on his back, although Fischer was miraculously caught unscathed after what could easily have been a fatal crash

This is the Messerschmitt 109 from Ofw J. Harmeling of 4./LG2 that was shot on October 29, 1940 in Langenhoe Wick in Essex, although this photo was taken in 1941 in Victoria Park, Arbroath, while being used for a Spitfire Fund Raising tour of Scotland with performances in Glasgow, Stonehaven and Laurencekirk

This is the Messerschmitt 109 from Ofw J. Harmeling of 4./LG2 that was shot on October 29, 1940 in Langenhoe Wick in Essex, although this photo was taken in 1941 in Victoria Park, Arbroath, while being used for a Spitfire Fund Raising tour of Scotland with performances in Glasgow, Stonehaven and Laurencekirk

This is the Messerschmitt 109 from Ofw J. Harmeling of 4./LG2 that was shot on October 29, 1940 in Langenhoe Wick in Essex, although this photo was taken in 1941 in Victoria Park, Arbroath, while being used for a Spitfire Fund Raising tour of Scotland with performances in Glasgow, Stonehaven and Laurencekirk

A Messerschmitt 109 was photographed on a RAF Maintenance Unit Queen Mary lowloader in London in October 1940 outside offices on 161 Clapham Road, belonging to another civil contractor hired by the Ministry of Air to repair aircraft wrecks, Portsmouth Carriers Ltd

A Messerschmitt 109 was photographed on a RAF Maintenance Unit Queen Mary lowloader in London in October 1940 outside offices on 161 Clapham Road, belonging to another civil contractor hired by the Ministry of Air to repair aircraft wrecks, Portsmouth Carriers Ltd

A Messerschmitt 109 was photographed on a RAF Maintenance Unit Queen Mary lowloader in London in October 1940 outside offices on 161 Clapham Road, belonging to another civil contractor hired by the Ministry of Air to repair aircraft wrecks, Portsmouth Carriers Ltd

On October 3, 1940, a Messerschmitt aircraft was shown to raise money for the Royal Borough of Windsor & Spitfire Fund. During that time, the German hunter was visited by Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret, with Princess Elizabeth being allowed to sit in the pilot's seat

On October 3, 1940, a Messerschmitt aircraft was shown to raise money for the Royal Borough of Windsor & Spitfire Fund. During that time, the German hunter was visited by Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret, with Princess Elizabeth being allowed to sit in the pilot's seat

On October 3, 1940, a Messerschmitt aircraft was shown to raise money for the Royal Borough of Windsor & Spitfire Fund. During that time, the German hunter was visited by Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret, with Princess Elizabeth being allowed to sit in the pilot's seat

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