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The Clavaria zollingeri fungi are & # 39; great to get people interested in fungi & # 39; according to Dr. Trevor Dines who saw this variety in North Wales

Shroom bloom! Rare & # 39; violet coral & # 39; fungus that looks like it belongs to the sea and is seen only a few days a year, is seen in North Wales

  • The Clavaria zollingeri is one of the rarest forms of fungi in the UK
  • The fungus can grow up to four centimeters long and looks like purple coral
  • The fungus only lasts a few days to a week, making them a rare find
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It may seem like something from the depths of the Great Barrier Reef, but this colorful specimen was actually seen along the side of a coastal path in Britain.

The rare & # 39; violet coral & # 39; Fungus, which appears only a few days a year, was noticed by conservationist Dr. Trevor Dines on the Llyn Peninsula in Gwynedd, North Wales.

It is one of the rarest forms of fungi in Britain and is up to ten centimeters long. It is rarely seen due to the fact that it only takes a few days to a week.

Dr. Dines claims that this is the first time he has seen one in ten years.

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The Clavaria zollingeri fungi are & # 39; great to get people interested in fungi & # 39; according to Dr. Trevor Dines who saw this variety in North Wales

The Clavaria zollingeri fungi are & # 39; great to get people interested in fungi & # 39; according to Dr. Trevor Dines who saw this variety in North Wales

& # 39; They are very colorful, so they are great for getting people interested in fungi & # 39 ;, he said.

The species of fungus has the scientific name Clavaria zollingeri and usually grows in grassy places near hardwood trees.

Dr. Trevor Dines says he saw the fungus while walking on the Llyn peninsula and this was the first time he had seen one in ten years.

Dr. Trevor Dines says he saw the fungus while walking on the Llyn peninsula and this was the first time he had seen one in ten years.

Dr. Trevor Dines says he saw the fungus while walking on the Llyn peninsula and this was the first time he had seen one in ten years.

Dr. Dines said after spotting the fungus on the Llyn Peninsula in Gwynedd, North Wales, he & # 39; could not believe & # 39; and & # 39; gave a scream & # 39 ;.

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He said: & # 39; This is the best time of the year to watch, but you never know exactly where or when – or even if – they will appear.

& # 39; Moreover, they only last a few days – at most a week – but that only adds to the pleasure of looking for fungi. & # 39;

Scientists say that the hot summer and a sudden drop in temperature have created good conditions for fungal growth.

Dr. Dines said: & # 39; We are currently seeing a little buzz because we are having such a good year. & # 39;

Restrictions have been imposed in areas such as the New Forest to protect fungi from professional feeds, while others have been designated as Sites or Special Scientific Interest (SSSI).

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Conservation charity Plantlife has launched a new project to increase the awareness of meadows and grasslands.

Violet Coral (Clavaria zollingeri)

Scientists say that a warm summer and a sudden drop in temperature make good conditions possible for growing fungi

Scientists say that a warm summer and a sudden drop in temperature make good conditions possible for growing fungi

Scientists say that a warm summer and a sudden drop in temperature make good conditions possible for growing fungi

Violet coral has the scientific name Clavaria zollingeri and has a distinctive coral-like appearance.

It has a deep violet color and a number of branches that grow from a thick stalk.

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It is usually solitary but can grow in small groups. It is found in coniferous forests and non-improved grassland.

It can grow up to four centimeters and is seen between July and November. However, it is only visible for a few days to a week.

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