Rapport finds more than TWO MILLION Americans do not have access to clean water

The United States is considered a & # 39; first world country & # 39; but a new report has shown that it is suffering from a problem in developing countries.

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Experts have found that more than two million Americans do not have access to running water, sanitation and sanitation.

The report revealed that race and poverty play a key role in access to water – native Americans and 19 times more likely to be left without, while black and Latino households are twice as likely as their white counterparts.

Many of the water systems still follow the dated infrastructure that has been developed on the basis of systemic racism, thereby restricting access to areas with minorities.

The report comes from the non-profit organizations DigDeep and the US Water Alliance, which went beyond Census data to investigate the country's water crisis.

Experts have found that more than two million Americans do not have access to running water, sanitation and sanitation. The report showed that race and poverty play a key role in access to water - Native Americans and 19 times more likely to be without

Experts have found that more than two million Americans do not have access to running water, sanitation and sanitation. The report showed that race and poverty play a key role in access to water – native Americans and 19 times without it

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"Access to clean, reliable running water and safe sanitation are basic conditions for health, prosperity and well-being," said DigDeep CEO George McGraw and US Water Alliance CEO Radhika Fox in a statement.

& # 39; However, they remain out of reach of some of the most vulnerable people in the United States. & # 39;

The data comes from a two-year study that included six & # 39; hotposts & # 39; of the US water crisis, including the Central Valley of California, areas of Texas, rural counties in Mississippi and Alabama, Appalachian West Virginia, the & # 39; four corners & # 39; from the southwest and Puerto Rico.

With more than two million Americans without running water, this means that around 1.4 million homes do not have a shower, toilet or sink.

The data comes from a two-year study that included six & # 39; hotposts & # 39; of the US water crisis, including the Central Valley of California, areas of Texas, rural counties in Mississippi and Alabama, Appalachian West Virginia, the & # 39; four corners & # 39; from the southwest and Puerto Rico

The data comes from a two-year study that included six & # 39; hotposts & # 39; of the US water crisis, including the Central Valley of California, areas of Texas, rural counties in Mississippi and Alabama, Appalachian West Virginia, the & # 39; four corners & # 39; from the southwest and Puerto Rico

The data comes from a two-year study that included six & # 39; hotposts & # 39; of the US water crisis, including the Central Valley of California, areas of Texas, rural counties in Mississippi and Alabama, Appalachian West Virginia, the & # 39; four corners & # 39; from the southwest and Puerto Rico

The team discovered that racing was the biggest predictor, as Indians, Blacks and Latinos suffered the most.

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Approximately 58 of every 1,000 Native American households were found to be without complete sanitary facilities, compared to three of every 1,000 white households.

The report also found that for 0.5 percent of African-Americans, households did not have complete sanitary facilities, nearly twice as many as white houses.

The report notes that this issue is a consequence of the previous infrastructure developed on the basis of systemic racism.

The report also found that 0.5 percent of African-American households did not have complete sanitary facilities, almost twice as many as white houses

The report also found that 0.5 percent of African-American households did not have complete sanitary facilities, almost twice as many as white houses

The report also found that 0.5 percent of African-American households did not have complete sanitary facilities, almost twice as many as white houses

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& # 39; For example, in the 1960s, Roanoke, VA, waterlines would not be extended to black neighborhoods & # 39 ;, the report reads.

& # 39; In the early 1900s, Spanish communities were discouraged from recording, excluding them from water and sanitation initiatives from the 1950s. & # 39;

Also included are 250,000 people in Puerto Rico and 553,000 homeless people in the US who have no access to water and sanitation.

In addition to the race, the team discovered that economic status also played a key role in access to water.

& # 39; For both African American and Latinx households, a higher income and higher education level are positively correlated with access to full sanitary facilities & # 39 ;, the team wrote.

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& # 39; Our analysis illustrates a correlation between full access to sanitary facilities with family income, level of education (which has been shown to be related to poverty) and unemployment rates. The analysis showed that censuses with a higher average family income had a lower percentage of households that did not have access to full sanitary facilities. & # 39;

The analysis also showed that higher percentages of residents without high school degrees are correlated with lower levels of full access to sanitary, regardless of race.

However, there is a bigger picture that needs to be addressed – 785 million people in the world have no access to safe water and two billion have no access to a good toilet, according to global non-profit Water.org.

It is predicted that climate change will increase these numbers in the coming decades.

FACT BOX TITLE

Millions of Americans are potentially drinking water contaminated with toxic chemicals related to behavioral problems, birth defects, cancer, high cholesterol levels and infertility, a new report finds.

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Researchers from the Environmental Working Group and Northeastern University found 610 sources in 43 states that contain unsafe levels of man-made chemicals in water, known as PFAS chemicals.

These locations include public water systems, military bases, airports and even training locations for firefighters and affect as many as 19 million Americans.

A new report found that 610 locations in 43 US states (map, above) contain unsafe levels of PFAS chemicals that are linked to birth defects and cancer

A new report found that 610 locations in 43 US states (map, above) contain unsafe levels of PFAS chemicals that are linked to birth defects and cancer

A new report found that 610 locations in 43 US states (map, above) contain unsafe levels of PFAS chemicals that are linked to birth defects and cancer

The Great Lake State has been fighting a water pollution crisis in Flint since 2014 after the drinking water source changed from Lake Huron and the Detroit River to the Flint River, which contained a lot of lead.

But PFAS has also been a burden. Residents of two communities in Kalamazoo County received bottled water last year after tests showed that there were many chemicals in drinking water, reported Think forward.

California with 47 and New Jersey with 43 locations completed the top three.

The map also showed that about 20 percent of sites with unsafe levels were military bases.

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