Rand Paul: ‘Hate for Trump’ is why scientists aren’t studying drug ivermectin as a COVID treatment

Scientists’ “hatred” of former President Donald Trump is why they will not consider the deworming drug ivermectin as a possible COVID-19 treatment, Kentucky Senator Rand Paul said Friday.

“The hatred of Trump has so confused these people that they are not willing to study it objectively,” he told a group of 60 voters gathered in the Cold Spring, Kentucky city council chamber.

He added that studies of hydroxychloroquine, a malaria drug touted by Trump and his supporters as a treatment for COVID, had been “contaminated” by researchers’ “hatred of Donald Trump.” Cincinnati Enquirer reported.

Ivermectin can be used in small doses to treat parasitic worm infections in humans, such as head lice and mange, but is more widely used in the US to control roundworms and other parasites in livestock.

Doctors say it is unable to treat viruses like COVID-19.

Both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration have repeatedly warned Americans about using it to treat COVID.

Rand Paul blamed scientists for 'deranged' hatred of Trump for failing to study ivermectin as a potential COVID treatment, despite existing studies failing to conclude efficacy

Rand Paul blamed scientists for ‘deranged’ hatred of Trump for failing to study ivermectin as a potential COVID treatment, despite existing studies failing to conclude efficacy

Trump has also touted hydroxychloroquine, an antimalarial drug, as a possible COVID treatment

Trump has also touted hydroxychloroquine, an antimalarial drug, as a possible COVID treatment

Trump has also touted hydroxychloroquine, an antimalarial drug, as a possible COVID treatment

There has been a significant spike in over-the-counter prescriptions for ivermectin beyond its limited recommended use – mostly in ‘veterinary formulations’ more suitable for livestock, such as horses.

Some who cannot get a prescription resort to using versions of the drugs made for animals.

“The side effects associated with ivermectin abuse and overdose are on the rise, as evidenced by an increase in calls to poison centers reporting overdoses and more people experiencing side effects,” notes the CDC.

On Friday, Paul said he was “in the middle” on whether the treatment was effective.

The Republican legislator was asked by a woman in his Cold Spring audience why ivermectin wasn’t more widely available, adding that she had some for herself “just in case.”

Paul replied that there wasn’t enough research to know for sure.

“I can’t tell you because they won’t study ivermectin,” he told voters.

He told the Cincinnati Enquirer that he wanted to “keep an open mind” on the subject.

What is ivermectin?

Ivermectin is an antiparasitic drug that was first discovered and used in veterinary medicine in the 1970s.

The FDA approved it in 1996 to treat parasitic diseases such as river blindness and roundworm-related problems in humans, according to the JAMA network. In recent years, a topical version has been approved for the treatment of head lice.

Human doses of ivermectin are usually given in tablets and contain a much smaller amount than for cattle. The latter use is much more common in the United States.

Ivermectin for Livestock is widely available in the US and often comes in highly concentrated doses.

Overdose of ivermectin can cause a number of symptoms, including: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, hypotension (low blood pressure), allergic reactions (itching and hives), dizziness, ataxia (balance problems), seizures, coma, and even death,” according to the FDA

Regulatory body warns people against taking drug doses explicitly intended for animals because it has not been properly tested and found safe for human use

Studies on ivermectin’s potential use as an antiviral drug, including COVID-19 treatment, have provided ‘insufficient data’ for scientists to figure it out, CDC states

However, it has been popularly used by many to treat the virus and was prescribed 88,000 times in one week, according to the CDC, a 24-fold increase over a typical pre-pandemic week.

The FDA has repeatedly urged people not to use the drug against the coronavirus.

‘You can also overdose on ivermectin, which can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, hypotension (low blood pressure), allergic reactions (itching and hives), dizziness, ataxia (balance problems), seizures, coma and even death. the FDA warned.

According to the CDC, calls to U.S. poison control centers about ivermectin exposure have increased fivefold since pre-pandemic, with a drastic rise in July.

The drug became popular in some circles following falsehoods about ivermectin’s alleged ability to treat the spread of COVID-19 on social media following some misinterpreted previous studies of the drug’s effectiveness.

Prescriptions for ivermectin, a wormer, have increased 24-fold from pre-pandemic levels.  The drug has been touted by some conservative figures as a treatment for COVID-19.

Prescriptions of ivermectin, a wormer, have increased 24-fold from pre-pandemic levels.  The drug has been touted by some conservative figures as a treatment for COVID-19.

Prescriptions of ivermectin, a wormer, have increased 24-fold from pre-pandemic levels. The drug has been touted by some conservative figures as a treatment for COVID-19.

Ivermectin can be prescribed in small doses to treat things like lice and mange in humans, but is often used to deworm livestock

Ivermectin can be prescribed in small doses to treat things like lice and mange in humans, but is often used to deworm livestock

Ivermectin can be prescribed in small doses to treat things like lice and mange in humans, but is often used to deworm livestock

Some prominent figures in the media have also pushed the drug.

Between March and this month, Fox News hosts Tucker Carlson, Sean Hannity and Laura Ingraham promoted the drug’s use as an alternative COVID-19 treatment.

In June, Sen. Ron Johnson, a Republican from Wisconsin, had his YouTube account suspended for posting a video advising viewers to use ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine as treatments for the virus.

Last week, Mississippi officials reported that 70 percent of recent poison control calls in the state resulted from abuse of the dewormer.

Texas has also reported a sharp spike in poison calls compared to last year.

In August 2020, Texas reported two poison control reports related to ivermectin, WFAA reported.

In August, the state received 55 calls, a 27-fold increase.

In addition, Texas Poison Control recorded 23 cases of ivermectin poisoning from January to August 2020, compared to 150 this year — a 552 percent increase.

These numbers are probably an undercount.

Cold Spring, where Paul was speaking, is near the Kentucky-Ohio border.

Scientists claim that vaccination is the best way to prevent COVID-19.  The US has seen nearly 640,000 COVID-related deaths since early 2020

Scientists claim that vaccination is the best way to prevent COVID-19.  The US has seen nearly 640,000 COVID-related deaths since early 2020

Scientists claim that vaccination is the best way to prevent COVID-19. The US has seen nearly 640,000 COVID-related deaths since early 2020

An hour north of Cold Spring in Ohio’s Butler County, a Common Pleas judge ordered a hospital in the University of Cincinnati network to treat a patient with ivermectin after it initially refused.

The lawsuit was filed by the wife of a hospitalized COVID-19 patient after an Ohio doctor she called “one of the foremost experts on the use of ivermectin in the treatment of COVID-19” prescribed it for its use. , according to the Ohio Capital Journal.

dr. Fred Wagshul accused the CDC and FDA of a “conspiracy” against the drug and compared the lack of government support for it to “genocide.”

Similar lawsuits have been filed in New York and Illinois.

At his town hall, Paul also complained on Friday against vaccine and mask mandates. He supported vaccinating older people, but emphasized that it is a personal choice.

Paul told his audience that he is “in the middle” when it comes to vaccines.

“I’m not against the vaccine. I’ve already advised you to take it if you’re at risk,’ he said. “It’s still your choice whether it’s a free country.”

It’s also not Paul’s first time targeting the scientific community — the senator has had several public feuds with Dr. Anthony Fauci during congressional hearings on the state of the pandemic.

The two men dealt verbal blows that led to Paul threatening Fauci with jail time and calling Fauci a “liar.”

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