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Radio 2 presenter Ken Bruce calls for ‘clearance of managers’ at the BBC

Radio 2 presenter Ken Bruce has called for a ‘manager clearance’ at the BBC, demanding that they ‘justify their existence’.

The veteran DJ, 69, has criticized the way licensing fees are spent and believes it should be used for programming rather than office bureaucrats and luxuries like the director general’s car.

Bruce’s mid-morning show is the most popular program on British radio, and the announcer insisted he loved the BBC.

However, he believes the national broadcaster is ‘over-managed’ and bosses should be forced to ‘justify’ their role.

He admitted that the company was a “frustrating place to work” and that it sometimes felt like there was a department dedicated to keeping creative ideas out of the blue.

Radio 2 presenter Ken Bruce

Lord Tony Hall, the outgoing director general of the BBC

Lord Tony Hall, the outgoing director general of the BBC

Radio 2 presenter Ken Bruce criticized the way the BBC uses its licensing fees. He criticized how Lord Tony Hall, the outgoing director general of the BBC, was entitled to a car and driver worth £ 30,000 a year

Speaking on the Radio Moments Conversations podcast with host David Lloyd, he said, ‘I sometimes think that a culling of managers wouldn’t be a bad thing.

“Every now and then they say ‘we’re doing that, we’re going to cut the layers of management’. And somehow, even if they do, they’ll be back in a few years.

“Unfortunately, part of our share of the license fee has to pay for the director general’s car, stuff like that, and a policy unit. How much does Radio 2 need of a government-related policy unit?

“The important thing is the programs, and once you forget them, you’re in trouble.”

He added, “It was always said that there was a famous part of the BBC, the Program Prevention Department, that existed purely to keep your ideas from getting airborne. I’m afraid it sometimes seems that way with the BBC.

“I am a huge admirer of the organization. But you can sometimes scratch your head and see yourself shooting yourself in the foot. And you think “please don’t do that to an organization we all love.” ‘

Bruce is the longest-serving DJ on Radio 2 and has hosted the mid-morning slot since 1992.

He made £ 280,000 last year, although that’s less than colleagues from Radio 2, including Jeremy Vine (£ 290,000), Zoe Ball (£ 370,000) and Steve Wright (£ 465,000).

Bruce's mid-morning show became the most popular on British radio last year, with an average weekly audience of nearly 8.5 million

Bruce's mid-morning show became the most popular on British radio last year, with an average weekly audience of nearly 8.5 million

Bruce’s mid-morning show became the most popular on British radio last year, with an average weekly audience of nearly 8.5 million

His show also became the most popular on British radio last year, beating Zoe Ball’s Breakfast show with an average weekly audience of nearly 8.5 million.

Lord Hall of Birkenhead, the director-general of the BBC, is entitled to a car and driver worth £ 30,000 a year on top of his annual salary of £ 450,000.

It’s because Naga Munchetty was robbed of her £ 190,000 salary after saying that the BBC license fee is ‘worth it’ to ensure viewers are ‘educated’.

Twitter users have accused the Breakfast host, 45, of paying £ 157.50 for color TV and £ 53 for black and white channels.

The end of the license fee has been raised by the government, with the threat of turning the BBC into a subscription service.

Munchetty told Radio Times magazine: “There has been noise about the license fee for decades.

“But at Breakfast we are not based on reviews, we are not there to get social media attention.

Naga Munchetty (pictured with co-host Charlie Stayt) is furious about her £ 190,000 salary after saying the BBC license fee is 'worth it'

Naga Munchetty (pictured with co-host Charlie Stayt) is furious about her £ 190,000 salary after saying the BBC license fee is 'worth it'

Naga Munchetty (pictured with co-host Charlie Stayt) is furious about her £ 190,000 salary after saying the BBC license fee is ‘worth it’

“We are here to provide a service and to ensure that people are informed, trained and entertained. I think a license is worth that. ‘

Earlier this month, the government threatened to ban the BBC from taking viewers to justice if they don’t pay their TV license.

It came a day after the company announced the end of August of free TV licensing for anyone over 75 years old.

It means that more than three million households must find a way to pay £ 157.50 for the service or they risk criminal charges.

Only those who receive retirement credit – estimated at around $ 1.5 million – still have free access to live TV and BBC iPlayer.

The prime minister’s spokesman said it was “the wrong decision,” while culture secretary Oliver Dowden said he felt “disappointed” and that the decision would have “implications” for proposals to make the license fee a criminal offense.

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