Radical new plan to force cyclists to wear ID tags with license plate style so that drivers can report them

Radical new plan forces cyclists to carry ID tags with license plate style, so drivers can report them for violating traffic rules

  • A new proposal could force bikers & # 39; ID tags & # 39; to wear so that they can be identified
  • The idea was presented Monday by the Tasmanian Motorcycle Council
  • It was brought to the Advisory Council on Road Safety in Tasmania for review
  • Bicycle network said on its Facebook page that the idea is poorly thought through & # 39; used to be

Laura Withers for Daily Mail Australia

Disappointed drivers could quickly report to cyclists that they are breaking the road rules, because a new proposal would force cyclists to carry ID tags with license plates.

The controversial idea has been proposed by the Tasmanian Motorcycle Council, who argues that mandatory identification would prevent cyclists from unreasonably obstructing traffic & # 39 ;.

The proposal, which was presented to the Road Safety Advisory Board in Tasmania, was announced yesterday on the Facebook page of TMC.

(Image of file) The idea of ​​the & # 39; ID tag & # 39; has been presented to Tasmania & # 39; s Road Safety Advisory Council

(Image of file) The idea & # 39; ID tag & # 39; has been presented to the Road Safety Advisory Board of Tasmania

It suggests that all cyclists older than 18 have to wear a number on their clothing or helmet, so if they are caught violating traffic rules, they can easily be identified and punished.

The council, which represents motorcyclists everywhere in Tasmania, says that the new initiative would target certain cyclists who show contempt for the rules, which they believe are due to a lack of education and enforcement & # 39 ;.

Paul Bullock, President Tasmanian Motorcycle Council Inc, issued an accusatory statement stating that the behavior of some road cyclists endangers the safety of other road users.

(Image of file) The proposal must ensure that the (pictured) roads of Tasmania are a safer place to travel

(Image of file) The proposal must ensure that the (pictured) roads of Tasmania are a safer place to travel

(Image of file) The proposal must ensure that the (pictured) roads of Tasmania are a safer place to travel

(Image of the file) Paul Bullock, President Tasmanian Motorcycle Council Inc said that cyclists "vehicles driving by road & # 39; obstruct

(Image of the file) Paul Bullock, President Tasmanian Motorcycle Council Inc said that cyclists "vehicles driving by road & # 39; obstruct

(Image of the file) Paul Bullock, President Tasmanian Motorcycle Council Inc said that cyclists "vehicles driving by road & # 39; obstruct

It was: & # 39; Although the majority of cyclists obey the law, there is an element within the cycling fraternity that does not always do that.

& # 39; They obstruct vehicles that drive on the road; while traveling in a group that performs much less speed compared to other vehicles, they will not be moved in one file to allow vehicles to pass.

Cyclists use the excuse that they are entitled to two on the road, while they do not accept that they unreasonably hinder traffic, which is illegal, & # 39; it said.

Although it is legal for cyclists to travel two and laws allowing other vehicles to cross double lines to drive safely, irresponsible and impolite driving will endanger cyclists and other road users. the explanation.

In addition to the declaration, a long list of traffic offenses for cyclists was noted, as well as the subsequent fines, if they were caught.

It was also suggested that the identification scheme could be financed through the road safety tax.

In addition to the declaration, a long list of traffic violations (photo & # 39; s) for cyclists was noted, as well as the subsequent fine, if caught

In addition to the declaration, a long list of traffic violations (photo & # 39; s) for cyclists was noted, as well as the subsequent fine, if caught

In addition to the declaration, a long list of traffic violations (photo & # 39; s) for cyclists was noted, as well as the subsequent fine, if caught

Bicycle Network, a charity that works to encourage more people to cycle, disproves the idea and scolds it as "badly thought through".

On the official Facebook page on Tuesday, the organization wrote: & # 39; Every now and then a media commentator or a member of the public will call for bicycle registration or licenses.

It is usually made in response to an incident involving a cyclist and is presented as a magical solution that will forever put an end to crashes and conflicts, & # 39; he said.

Finally, the statement said: & # 39; But it is always badly thought through, registration does not stop with crashes and registration does not pay for roads. However, it would prevent people from riding bicycles. & # 39;

.